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Despite being one of the most remote places on Earth, the glaciers of South Georgia Island are home to an abundance of life.

Biodiversity researcher Dr Anne D Jungblut has been finding out exactly how many species these vast ice masses support.
About half of the island is covered in ice and, until recently, it was thought that glaciers were sterile systems that supported no life.

Research has now shown that in reality, glaciers are home to as much biodiversity as temperate soils, therefore a biome in their own right. They also represent Earth's largest freshwater habitats.

Anne was awarded a National Geographic Society research grant to study the glaciers of South Georgia, along with collaborators Dr Arwyn Edwards and Dr Tristram Irvine-Fynn from Aberystwyth University and Dr David Pearce from Northumbria University.

They conducted the first-ever study on the diversity of microbes that are thriving in the glaciers.

Anne hopes to contribute to the bank of scientific knowledge about exactly what lives in and on the area's glaciers. This will allow future scientists to learn even more about the biodiversity of glaciers all over the world.

Find out more at nhm.ac.uk/discover

#SouthGeorgiaIsland #Glaciers #Ice #Microbes #ScienceNews #Research #Fieldwork #Biodiversity #Science #NaturalHistory #NaturalHistoryMuseum #Museum #London #SouthGeorgia #Penguins
User Image salma.kurnia123 Posted: Feb 24, 2018 9:26 AM (UTC)

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Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands, few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image georgiazavatti Posted: Feb 24, 2018 8:52 AM (UTC)
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regram @natgeo
Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands, few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image seedellio Posted: Feb 24, 2018 8:44 AM (UTC)

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#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
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Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands, few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image jukabod Posted: Feb 24, 2018 5:48 AM (UTC)

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#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands, few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image the_online_adventurer Posted: Feb 24, 2018 12:44 AM (UTC)

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Click the link in the bio if you want to join me online, it's the new 9-5!!! Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands, few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image karen.fine Posted: Feb 23, 2018 11:53 PM (UTC)

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Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands, few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland @RepostIt_app
User Image telizmarypinales Posted: Feb 23, 2018 10:28 PM (UTC)

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#Repost from @natgeo with @regram.app ... Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image natgeo Posted: Feb 23, 2018 10:23 PM (UTC)
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natgeo 11h ago
Photo by @FransLanting Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. It’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands, few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that could have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image on_the_rocky_shore Posted: Feb 23, 2018 6:12 PM (UTC)
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Do Your Part to Keep the Earth 🌏 Clean! Jehovah Will Do the Rest!
#Repost @franslanting
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Our oceans are full of junk and albatrosses searching for food often mistake floating plastic and rubber objects for fish or squid and swallow them. Why do they do that? Well, it’s hard to know what goes on inside the mind of an albatross, but I speculate that they are hardwired to swallow things that feel like fish or squid and plastic or rubber may not taste that different to a hungry albatross. After all, their feeding habits evolved long before there was any plastic junk out at sea. When you walk around an albatross colony you see the sad results. Many thousands of albatross chicks die every year because their parents feed them plastic instead of fish and it clogs up their intestines until they die. It’s heartbreaking to see their decaying corpses full of junk, but because this mortality occurs on remote oceanic islands very few people know this is a problem, so we need to show and share what is going on. For this image I asked a British Antarctic Survey researcher on South Georgia’s Bird Island to unwrap a roll of plastic that had been regurgitated by a wandering albatross. Imagine what that would have done to the bird or its chick if it had unwound in their guts. Plastic pollution is a global problem, but there are local solutions. They start with banning single use plastic items from your own lifestyle and from your community and there are lots of campaigns gaining momentum that can effect change on a bigger scale. Check some of the hashtags and share this post. And follow us @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories about these amazing birds who deserve better than to die from plastic pollution.
@leonardodicaprio @leonardodicapriofdn @birdlife_insta @rspb_love_nature @plasticpollutes @sea_legacy #Albatross #Seabird #Naturelovers #Ocean #Birdphotography #YearoftheBird #Pollution #Plasticpollution #SouthGeorgiaIsland
User Image andra.m.popa Posted: Feb 23, 2018 3:30 PM (UTC)

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Gabi: A pleasure to meet you, sir! Penguin: Yeah, ok.