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User Image science_fanclub.hq Posted: Nov 19, 2017 10:09 PM (UTC)
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"Your Christmas is covered at the Science Museum Shop! Enjoy an exclusive discount on unique science-inspired gadgets, fashion, children’s toys and more until 09.00 Monday 20 November. Click the link in our bio for more.
Via @sciencemuseum
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User Image science_funny.hq Posted: Nov 19, 2017 10:08 PM (UTC)
astrophysics_
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"When we think of something like antimatter, our minds usually turn to science fiction. Yet unlike an antimatter engine used to power a fictional spacecraft, antimatter is actually real, and an international team of researchers including researchers from the University of Calgary are working to solve some of the mystery surrounding antimatter.
Rob Thomson is the department head and professor of physics and astronomy at UCalgary. His research team are members of an experiment called ALPHA, whose primary objective is to look into the properties of antimatter.
According to experiment and observations, antimatter behaves identically to regular matter. The only difference between antimatter and regular matter is that both are oppositely charged. However, this creates a problem. Antimatter and regular matter should exist in equal amounts in accordance with the conservation of energy. Clearly our universe didn’t turn out like this, being that we’re all made of regular matter.
To unravel this and other mysteries about antimatter, the ALPHA collaboration, which is based at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, captures and studies anti hydrogen atoms created in the lab. By capturing these atoms, scientists hope to compare them to regular hydrogen atoms and find out if there’s any differences between them.
In 2002, scientists first successfully made anti hydrogen atoms. In 2010, ALPHA had made 38 such atoms by using electromagnetic fields and cooling the particles down to near absolute zero. By 2011, they were able to capture and store them for up to 15 minutes. Just long enough to study them in detail.
Since then, the ALPHA team was able to confirm that the anti hydrogen atoms has a net charge of zero, exactly as predicted from theory.
The team’s next step is to try and understand anti hydrogen’s optical properties, such as the colours of light it emits and absorbs. These studies may only be the beginning, and in the future we may have the capability to store antimatter for longer periods of time, maybe even allowing us to use it as fuel for our future intergalactic spacecraft. @ucalgary
Via @astrophysics_
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User Image science_c00l Posted: Nov 19, 2017 10:05 PM (UTC)
scienceinnyc
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"Mouth bacteria. They almost look like a Pollock painting...
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Les bactérias de la bouche. Ils sont comme une peinture Pollock...
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嘴巴裡的細菌。看起來像波洛克的畫...
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*

Via @scienceinnyc
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User Image science_space.hq Posted: Nov 19, 2017 10:05 PM (UTC)
scienceishard
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"I don't belive it. 👀 👽
🔭
Via ▪

Via @scienceishard
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User Image science_fanclub.hq Posted: Nov 19, 2017 7:13 PM (UTC)
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"Assassin’s Creed Origins is out now on Xbox One, Playstation 4 and PC! @ubisoft @ubisoft_nordic
Via @sciencepurely
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User Image science_funny.hq Posted: Nov 19, 2017 7:10 PM (UTC)
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"You've literally never seen your favorite works of art with this much detail before.
Via @futurismscience
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User Image science_space.hq Posted: Nov 19, 2017 7:09 PM (UTC)
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"You've literally never seen your favorite works of art with this much detail before.
Via @futurismscience
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User Image science_c00l Posted: Nov 19, 2017 7:07 PM (UTC)
astrophysics_
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"When we think of something like antimatter, our minds usually turn to science fiction. Yet unlike an antimatter engine used to power a fictional spacecraft, antimatter is actually real, and an international team of researchers including researchers from the University of Calgary are working to solve some of the mystery surrounding antimatter.
Rob Thomson is the department head and professor of physics and astronomy at UCalgary. His research team are members of an experiment called ALPHA, whose primary objective is to look into the properties of antimatter.
According to experiment and observations, antimatter behaves identically to regular matter. The only difference between antimatter and regular matter is that both are oppositely charged. However, this creates a problem. Antimatter and regular matter should exist in equal amounts in accordance with the conservation of energy. Clearly our universe didn’t turn out like this, being that we’re all made of regular matter.
To unravel this and other mysteries about antimatter, the ALPHA collaboration, which is based at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, captures and studies anti hydrogen atoms created in the lab. By capturing these atoms, scientists hope to compare them to regular hydrogen atoms and find out if there’s any differences between them.
In 2002, scientists first successfully made anti hydrogen atoms. In 2010, ALPHA had made 38 such atoms by using electromagnetic fields and cooling the particles down to near absolute zero. By 2011, they were able to capture and store them for up to 15 minutes. Just long enough to study them in detail.
Since then, the ALPHA team was able to confirm that the anti hydrogen atoms has a net charge of zero, exactly as predicted from theory.
The team’s next step is to try and understand anti hydrogen’s optical properties, such as the colours of light it emits and absorbs. These studies may only be the beginning, and in the future we may have the capability to store antimatter for longer periods of time, maybe even allowing us to use it as fuel for our future intergalactic spacecraft. @ucalgary
Via @astrophysics_
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Reflecting on an awesome conference in a crazy cool city and already looking forward to SCWS2020 in Mexico City #scws2017 #tokyo #sciencecentre #sciencecenter #flyingfishexhibits #miraikan #aspac2017
User Image hafizhussin_ Posted: Nov 19, 2017 2:16 PM (UTC)
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Mengimbas kembali zaman belajar di universiti. Ddk dalam bilik kuliah dgr lecturer mengajar sambil tgk jam bila la kelas nk habis😄😆#backthenandnow #universitystudent #appreciatewhatyouhave #preciousmoments #sciencecentre #singapore #sciencecastle
User Image science_funny.hq Posted: Nov 19, 2017 10:20 AM (UTC)
astrophysics_
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"Looking at the image above is like looking into the future. What you see in the image is a planetary nebulae, a stellar remnant that stars like our sun leave behind when their life comes to an end. Only so much hydrogen can exist in a star, and one day it will run out. When this happens, the gravity of the star begins to crush it down, igniting further nuclear processes in the core that fuse helium together to form heavier elements. The star will expand to many times its original size, becoming what is called a red giant star. Because stars like our sun are not very massive, the fusion process does create nearly as many elements as it does in more massive stars. Because of this, stars of this mass do not go out in a supernova explosion. Rather, they expand until their gravity can no longer hold them together, and the outer layers of the star are blown off and form a shell of stellar material around the star called a planetary nebula. Inside the star, the core compresses and becomes a white dwarf star.
Via @astrophysics_
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