Toggle navigation

#fossilfuel7,079 POSTS

Post Content
User Image greenpeace_canada Posted: Dec 15, 2017 5:14 PM (UTC)

180
6 Normal
It's been a historical week, as some of the world's biggest financiers, including the @worldbank, turned their backs on the fossil fuel industry. DOUBLE TAP to celebrate this news!
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
#fossilfuel #coal #oil #NotPipelines #StopKM #earth #land #water #home #life #StopPipelines #pipeline #resistance #Canada #activism #resist #IndigenousRights #WaterIsLife #SacredEarth #environment #defund #divest #peoplepower
User Image thecountzee Posted: Dec 15, 2017 7:54 AM (UTC)

8
2 Normal
Alison Clouston's art project, protesting Clive Palmer's coalmine which was threatening a nature reserve. Photographed by Danielle Smith

#Art #Photography #AlisonClouston #DanielleSmith #ClivePalmer #FossilFuel #Reserve #Swamp #Activism #Environment #Nature #ModernArt
User Image upstreamlyltd Posted: Dec 15, 2017 6:51 AM (UTC)
25
1 Normal
#FPSO Petrojari Knarr illuminating her way through the Pacific Ocean as she sails away from Geoje. FPSO Petrojari Knarr is the newest ship of #Teekay Corporation.
Image: Teekay, Mr. Trond Arne Hageland.
User Image wednesday.1975 Posted: Dec 15, 2017 3:19 AM (UTC)

3
0 Normal
Regranned from @freedom_faction - A major shift in energy policy was announced on Tuesday, as the President of the #WorldBank, Jim Yong Kim, made a statement during the #OnePlanetSummit in #Paris that said the bank will largely stop funding oil and gas exploration and extraction projects after 2019.

The World Bank provides loans to developing countries to foster economic growth, but which also give the bank an inordinate amount of power over domestic policy these countries.

The Bank ceased lending for coal-fired power stations in 2010 but has been under pressure from lobby groups to also halt the $1 billion a year it has been lending for oil and gas in developing countries, according to The Guardian.

A statement released by the World Bank said that it “will no longer finance upstream oil and gas,” citing a need to change in a “rapidly changing world.” Previously, in 2015, the World Bank committed to have 28% of its portfolio dedicated to climate action by 2020, with the bank’s most recent statement on #fossilfuel financing showing it set to achieve that goal.

The World Bank’s plan does lay out a caveat for “exceptional circumstances,” noting that “consideration will be given to financing upstream gas in the poorest countries where there is a clear benefit in terms of energy access for the poor and the project fits within the countries’ #ParisAgreement commitments.” During the summit, Dutch bank ING announced that it intends to phase out investments in coal power generation by 2025, while the massive Storebrand pension fund of #Norway disclosed plans to increase investments in fossil-free to $3 billion.

The executive director of Oil Change International, Stephen Kretzmann noted that it was “hard to overstate the significance of this historic announcement.” “Environmental, human rights, and development campaigners have been amplifying the voices of frontline communities for decades in calling for an end to World Bank financing of upstream oil and gas projects. 🖐🏾More in comments👇🏾#Agenda21 #Agenda2030 #SustainableDevelopment #ParadigmShift - #regrann
User Image aintnothingnewunderthesun Posted: Dec 15, 2017 2:14 AM (UTC)

73
4 Normal
By @freedom_faction
A major shift in energy policy was announced on Tuesday, as the President of the #WorldBank, Jim Yong Kim, made a statement during the #OnePlanetSummit in #Paris that said the bank will largely stop funding oil and gas exploration and extraction projects after 2019.

The World Bank provides loans to developing countries to foster economic growth, but which also give the bank an inordinate amount of power over domestic policy these countries.

The Bank ceased lending for coal-fired power stations in 2010 but has been under pressure from lobby groups to also halt the $1 billion a year it has been lending for oil and gas in developing countries, according to The Guardian.

A statement released by the World Bank said that it “will no longer finance upstream oil and gas,” citing a need to change in a “rapidly changing world.” Previously, in 2015, the World Bank committed to have 28% of its portfolio dedicated to climate action by 2020, with the bank’s most recent statement on #fossilfuel financing showing it set to achieve that goal.

The World Bank’s plan does lay out a caveat for “exceptional circumstances,” noting that “consideration will be given to financing upstream gas in the poorest countries where there is a clear benefit in terms of energy access for the poor and the project fits within the countries’ #ParisAgreement commitments.” During the summit, Dutch bank ING announced that it intends to phase out investments in coal power generation by 2025, while the massive Storebrand pension fund of #Norway disclosed plans to increase investments in fossil-free to $3 billion.

The executive director of Oil Change International, Stephen Kretzmann noted that it was “hard to overstate the significance of this historic announcement.” “Environmental, human rights, and development campaigners have been amplifying the voices of frontline communities for decades in calling for an end to World Bank financing of upstream oil and gas projects. 🖐🏾More in comments @freedom_faction 👇🏾#Agenda21 #Agenda2030 #SustainableDevelopment #ParadigmShift
User Image freedom_faction Posted: Dec 15, 2017 1:31 AM (UTC)

1,435
55 Normal
A major shift in energy policy was announced on Tuesday, as the President of the #WorldBank, Jim Yong Kim, made a statement during the #OnePlanetSummit in #Paris that said the bank will largely stop funding oil and gas exploration and extraction projects after 2019.

The World Bank provides loans to developing countries to foster economic growth, but which also give the bank an inordinate amount of power over domestic policy these countries.

The Bank ceased lending for coal-fired power stations in 2010 but has been under pressure from lobby groups to also halt the $1 billion a year it has been lending for oil and gas in developing countries, according to The Guardian.

A statement released by the World Bank said that it “will no longer finance upstream oil and gas,” citing a need to change in a “rapidly changing world.” Previously, in 2015, the World Bank committed to have 28% of its portfolio dedicated to climate action by 2020, with the bank’s most recent statement on #fossilfuel financing showing it set to achieve that goal.

The World Bank’s plan does lay out a caveat for “exceptional circumstances,” noting that “consideration will be given to financing upstream gas in the poorest countries where there is a clear benefit in terms of energy access for the poor and the project fits within the countries’ #ParisAgreement commitments.” During the summit, Dutch bank ING announced that it intends to phase out investments in coal power generation by 2025, while the massive Storebrand pension fund of #Norway disclosed plans to increase investments in fossil-free to $3 billion.

The executive director of Oil Change International, Stephen Kretzmann noted that it was “hard to overstate the significance of this historic announcement.” “Environmental, human rights, and development campaigners have been amplifying the voices of frontline communities for decades in calling for an end to World Bank financing of upstream oil and gas projects. 🖐🏾More in comments👇🏾#Agenda21 #Agenda2030 #SustainableDevelopment #ParadigmShift
User Image dan_chip Posted: Dec 14, 2017 10:28 PM (UTC)

28
0 Normal
Today I lit a bonfire in my mum's garden. Can you guess how I got it going so quickly? Quick slosh over the pyre, firelighter thrown in from a few paces back. Dangerous, foolish but oh so exciting. think my mum found it exciting too. She handed me the firelighter and matches 😂 #pyro #bonfires #gardenwork #garden #fossilfuel #danger #lifeontheedge #riskybusiness
User Image renewablegreens Posted: Dec 14, 2017 9:23 AM (UTC)

1
0 Normal
"Their educational delivery system and their ability to look at labor markets and respond to certain sectors in their service areas is incredibly impressive. Community colleges are a critical cog in closing skill gaps, workforce readiness and local economic growth" stated Jane Weissman, president of IREC when asked about how community colleges may help expand job opportunities for clean energy.
Read the rest of the interview here http://bit.ly/2j5OROl
#wearethefuture #fossilfuel #renewableenergy
User Image 911outlaw Posted: Dec 13, 2017 10:04 PM (UTC)

3,546
6 Normal
User Image geologyinpics Posted: Dec 13, 2017 6:43 PM (UTC)

158
0 Normal
Formation of Coal
Coal formed millions of years ago when the earth was covered with huge swampy [marshy] forests where plants – giant ferns and mosses – grew.

As the plants grew, some died and fell into the swamp waters. New plants grew up to take their places and when these died still more grew.

In time, there was thick layer of dead plants rotting in the swamp. The surface of the earth changed and water and dirt washed in, stopping the decaying process.

More plants grew up, but they too died and fell, forming separate layers. After millions of years many layers had formed, one on top of the other.

The weight of the top layers and the water and dirt packed down the lower layers of plant matter.

Heat and pressure produced chemical and physical changes in the plant layers which forced out oxygen and left rich carbon deposits. In time, material that had been plants became coal.

Coals are classified into three main ranks, or types: lignite, bituminous coal, and anthracite.

These classifications are based on the amount of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen present in the coal.

Coals other constituents include hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, ash, and sulfur.

Some of the undesirable chemical constituents include chlorine and sodium.

In the process of transformation (coalification), peat is altered to lignite, lignite is altered to sub-bituminous, sub-bituminous coal is altered to bituminous coal, and bituminous coal is altered to anthracite

#coal #fossilfuel # geology #geologia #geologist #geolog #geography #earth #geoeducation #coalgeology #coalformation #anthracite #bituminous #lignite #peat #coalification #geologia #geología #geoscience #geosciences #fuel #coalpetrology #hydrocarbons #mineralfuel #minerals #organicpetrology
User Image cape_doctors Posted: Dec 13, 2017 5:45 PM (UTC)

2
0 Normal
CAPE President @courtghoward speaks up on Environment Canada's bizarre statement that #naturalgas is NOT a #fossilfuel and is an adequate source of #cleanenergy, which is simply not the case. Further clarity is needed when speaking about clean energy in the future!
Available now! Link in my Bio. @PangeaSeed Foundation is pleased to offer the latest print of the ongoing Sea of Change: The Year of Living Dangerously - Vol. 3 print suite by guest artist @onurpainting (Switzerland).
.
The highlighted species of this edition is the iconic polar bear and the issue of climate change as it relates to fossil fuels and human impact.
.
"Last Island" is a stunning limited edition 24x36 inch behemoth 14 color screen print edition. Each print is signed/numbered by the artist. .
Available via the link in our profile or follow below:
.
shop.pangeaseed.co
.
Visit the link to learn more about the artwork, view the artist statement, and understand how you can help save threatened wildlife and our oceans.
.
Proceeds go directly to support our efforts to help save our seas via art and activism (ARTivism).
.
Printed by the good people of @vgkids
.
#pangeaseed #seawalls #onur #artivism #paintforapurpose #oceansmatter #saveourseas #ocean #art #polarbear #artprint #screenprint #print #printmaking #climatechange #fossilfuel #globalwarming #bethechange

Hashtags found on this page