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#fightingextinction1,472 POSTS

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User Image everydayextinction Posted: Feb 23, 2018 11:29 AM (UTC)

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - samburu moron, lion beadwork, northern Kenya - Not only are large carnivores such as lions important to Kenya’s ecology, but low-density lion populations, such as those found in habitats such as samburu, may actually also be critically important to ensuring the long term survival of the species - At over 250,000 square kilometers this area represents a vast expanse of wilderness and one of the planets most important unprotected reservoirs of wildlife and biodiversity. It may also support one of East Africa’s largest unprotected lion populations. It’s vital if this population is survive at all in a landscape increasingly shrinking ahead of mans ceaseless advance, that those who would wish to protect it, such as @ewasolions engage with, and receive the cooperation and support of those communities who live alongside not only lion, but other carnivores too. I’m here documenting the amazing work; both wildlife and cultural of @ewasolions - to see more of this story follow me here @chancellordavid @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #lion #africa #kenya #northernkenya #samburu #leopard #wilddog #jackal #carnivores #conserving #conservation #fightingextinction
User Image aroundlore Posted: Feb 22, 2018 10:53 PM (UTC)

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - controlled burn, northern Kenya - impersonating extinction in the rangelands of northern Kenya - The drought across East Africa in 2016-17 has given a stark preview of the challenges that the region will face in the coming years, as degraded landscapes, growing populations, and the impacts of climate change combine to reduce arability and habitability of key landscapes. In Kenya, conflicts have been exacerbated, resulting in lands and homes being raided by pastoralists, putting endangered wildlife populations, habitats and vital landscapes in further jeopardy.
Supported my National Geographic Society, scientists at Mpala Research Centre, northern Kenya are currently engaged in a long-term (1995) field experiment in a dry savannah woodland ecosystem. The main idea: to use different types of fencing to exclude different groups of herbivores - mega-herbivores (elephants, giraffes), all mid- to large-size wild herbivores, cattle. The setup allows scientists to study the effects of different herbivore groups on the landscape and on each other. The different exclusion plots also mimic different extinction or management scenarios. For instance, what if we kept all the large wildlife off the land, and kept the land only for our cattle? What if elephants and giraffes went extinct? Now using controlled burns they are examining the interactions between fire and different large herbivore ecosystems, asking questions like: How do herbivore affect fire temperature, patchiness and impacts? How do different herbivores (wildlife, elephants, cattle) respond to burns? How do fire and herbivores interact to drive savanna ecosystem function? They have now shown that fire alone and elephants alone have minimal impacts on savanna trees, but that the two in combination greatly reduce tree cover. @natgeo @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #northernkenya #kenya #fire #bushfire #conserving #conservation @usuaggielife
Thanks to @thephotosociety
#mountaintop #travelbag #travelasia #traveling #travelbug #traveller #travelpic #views #traveltips #mountain #travelmore #travelusa #travelphoto #mountainlion #seaworld #travelogue #tr
User Image honeybear__love Posted: Feb 22, 2018 9:23 PM (UTC)

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- controlled burn, northern Kenya - impersonating extinction in the rangelands of northern Kenya - The drought across East Africa in 2016-17 has given a stark preview of the challenges that the region will face in the coming years, as degraded landscapes, growing populations, and the impacts of climate change combine to reduce arability and habitability of key landscapes. In Kenya, conflicts have been exacerbated, resulting in lands and homes being raided by pastoralists, putting endangered wildlife populations, habitats and vital landscapes in further jeopardy.
Supported my National Geographic Society, scientists at Mpala Research Centre, northern Kenya are currently engaged in a long-term (1995) field experiment in a dry savannah woodland ecosystem. The main idea: to use different types of fencing to exclude different groups of herbivores - mega-herbivores (elephants, giraffes), all mid- to large-size wild herbivores, cattle. The setup allows scientists to study the effects of different herbivore groups on the landscape and on each other. The different exclusion plots also mimic different extinction or management scenarios. For instance, what if we kept all the large wildlife off the land, and kept the land only for our cattle? What if elephants and giraffes went extinct? Now using controlled burns they are examining the interactions between fire and different large herbivore ecosystems, asking questions like: How do herbivore affect fire temperature, patchiness and impacts? How do different herbivores (wildlife, elephants, cattle) respond to burns? How do fire and herbivores interact to drive savanna ecosystem function? They have now shown that fire alone and elephants alone have minimal impacts on savanna trees, but that the two in combination greatly reduce tree cover. #fightingextinction #northernkenya #kenya #fire #bushfire #conserving #conservation #jöh #aşk #jacobsartorius #kanyewest #teachersfollowteachers #lovequotes #engagementring #contemporaryart #hottemperature #loyal #dadbody #cid #capture #estimation #geography #physics #science #study #roads #environmentandecology #upsc #important
User Image thephotosociety Posted: Feb 22, 2018 9:08 PM (UTC)

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - controlled burn, northern Kenya - impersonating extinction in the rangelands of northern Kenya - The drought across East Africa in 2016-17 has given a stark preview of the challenges that the region will face in the coming years, as degraded landscapes, growing populations, and the impacts of climate change combine to reduce arability and habitability of key landscapes. In Kenya, conflicts have been exacerbated, resulting in lands and homes being raided by pastoralists, putting endangered wildlife populations, habitats and vital landscapes in further jeopardy.
Supported my National Geographic Society, scientists at Mpala Research Centre, northern Kenya are currently engaged in a long-term (1995) field experiment in a dry savannah woodland ecosystem. The main idea: to use different types of fencing to exclude different groups of herbivores - mega-herbivores (elephants, giraffes), all mid- to large-size wild herbivores, cattle. The setup allows scientists to study the effects of different herbivore groups on the landscape and on each other. The different exclusion plots also mimic different extinction or management scenarios. For instance, what if we kept all the large wildlife off the land, and kept the land only for our cattle? What if elephants and giraffes went extinct? Now using controlled burns they are examining the interactions between fire and different large herbivore ecosystems, asking questions like: How do herbivore affect fire temperature, patchiness and impacts? How do different herbivores (wildlife, elephants, cattle) respond to burns? How do fire and herbivores interact to drive savanna ecosystem function? They have now shown that fire alone and elephants alone have minimal impacts on savanna trees, but that the two in combination greatly reduce tree cover. @natgeo @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #northernkenya #kenya #fire #bushfire #conserving #conservation @usuaggielife
User Image partypetz Posted: Feb 22, 2018 7:32 AM (UTC)

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Today is National Wildlife Day. This day serves to bring awareness to the number of endangered animals nationally and globally, that need to be preserved and rescued. It’s also a day to acknowledge the amazing job our zoos and wildlife sanctuaries and organisations do to help fight extinction. This date also honors wildlife conservationist Steve Irwin’s birthday @australiazoo 📷 by Lucas Alexander on @unsplash .
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#partypetz #nationalwildlifeday #fightingextinction #saveouranimals #loveanimals #steveirwin #instagood #nature #wild #animal #instagood #outdoors #naturelover #love #picoftheday #instagram #safari #earth #wildlifeplanet #instanature #thursday #natgeo #australiazoo #animals #beautiful #adventure #landscape
User Image everydayextinction Posted: Feb 20, 2018 11:50 AM (UTC)

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - controlled burn, northern Kenya - impersonating extinction in the rangelands of northern Kenya - The drought across East Africa in 2016-17 has given a stark preview of the challenges that the region will face in the coming years, as degraded landscapes, growing populations, and the impacts of climate change combine to reduce arability and habitability of key landscapes. In Kenya, conflicts have been exacerbated, resulting in lands and homes being raided by pastoralists, putting endangered wildlife populations, habitats and vital landscapes in further jeopardy.
Supported my National Geographic Society, scientists at Mpala Research Centre, northern Kenya are currently engaged in a long-term (1995) field experiment in a dry savannah woodland ecosystem. The main idea: to use different types of fencing to exclude different groups of herbivores - mega-herbivores (elephants, giraffes), all mid- to large-size wild herbivores, cattle. The setup allows scientists to study the effects of different herbivore groups on the landscape and on each other. The different exclusion plots also mimic different extinction or management scenarios. For instance, what if we kept all the large wildlife off the land, and kept the land only for our cattle? What if elephants and giraffes went extinct? Now using controlled burns they are examining the interactions between fire and different large herbivore ecosystems, asking questions like: How do herbivore affect fire temperature, patchiness and impacts? How do different herbivores (wildlife, elephants, cattle) respond to burns? How do fire and herbivores interact to drive savanna ecosystem function? They have now shown that fire alone and elephants alone have minimal impacts on savanna trees, but that the two in combination greatly reduce tree cover. @natgeo @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #northernkenya #kenya #fire #bushfire #conserving #conservation @usuaggielife
User Image chancellordavid Posted: Feb 20, 2018 10:04 AM (UTC)

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - controlled burn, northern Kenya - impersonating extinction in the rangelands of northern Kenya - The drought across East Africa in 2016-17 has given a stark preview of the challenges that the region will face in the coming years, as degraded landscapes, growing populations, and the impacts of climate change combine to reduce arability and habitability of key landscapes. In Kenya, conflicts have been exacerbated, resulting in lands and homes being raided by pastoralists, putting endangered wildlife populations, habitats and vital landscapes in further jeopardy.
Supported my National Geographic Society, scientists at Mpala Research Centre, northern Kenya are currently engaged in a long-term (1995) field experiment in a dry savannah woodland ecosystem. The main idea: to use different types of fencing to exclude different groups of herbivores - mega-herbivores (elephants, giraffes), all mid- to large-size wild herbivores, cattle. The setup allows scientists to study the effects of different herbivore groups on the landscape and on each other. The different exclusion plots also mimic different extinction or management scenarios. For instance, what if we kept all the large wildlife off the land, and kept the land only for our cattle? What if elephants and giraffes went extinct? Now using controlled burns they are examining the interactions between fire and different large herbivore ecosystems, asking questions like: How do herbivore affect fire temperature, patchiness and impacts? How do different herbivores (wildlife, elephants, cattle) respond to burns? How do fire and herbivores interact to drive savanna ecosystem function? They have now shown that fire alone and elephants alone have minimal impacts on savanna trees, but that the two in combination greatly reduce tree cover. @natgeo @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #northernkenya #kenya #fire #bushfire #conserving #conservation @usuaggielife
User Image brandonjellyfish Posted: Feb 19, 2018 10:09 AM (UTC)

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Encouraging the mini Steve Irwin’s to follow in the great mans footsteps #Conservation #Education #FightingExtinction #WildlifeXposure
User Image everydayextinction Posted: Feb 17, 2018 4:07 PM (UTC)

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of The Matthews (or Mathews) Range, also known as the Lenkiyio Hills, northern Kenya - the area is isolated, and holds forests of juniper and cycads. It is home to elephants and other large mammals, and was one of the last places in northern Kenya to have wild Black Rhinos. The last Black Rhino in the Mathew's was poached out in the 1990s. The Mathew's are also home to the Samburu people. The mountain range is a sky island, surrounded by plains, with Ndoto Mountains to the north and the Karisia hills to the west. Sky islands are isolated mountains surrounded by radically different lowland environments. Such isolation has significant implications for these natural habitats. A number of the species in the Mathew's have evolved independently and the diversity of the high altitude forest is of great conservation value - I’ll be working in this incredible part of the world for the next few weeks #conserving #conservation #kenya #northernkenya #samburu #nopoaching #lion #withbutterfliesandwarriors @ewasolions @everydayextinction #fightingextinction
User Image fightingextinction Posted: Feb 16, 2018 1:12 AM (UTC)
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One of my faves. Yellowstone’s first snow day of ‘17. ❄️🦌
User Image curvygalmogul Posted: Jan 23, 2018 12:55 AM (UTC)

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I never heard of these animals till I seen @panamaruyami post about extinct animals.
User Image onesmallripple Posted: Feb 13, 2018 12:09 PM (UTC)

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Repost from @everydayextinction using @RepostRegramApp - Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Amur tiger, Russia’s Far East - Russia’s Far East is home to 95 percent of the global population of Amur tigers; I was lucky enough to work there in 2005. A census that year showed that there were between 423 to 502 individuals. A decade later, according to an interim survey released by the russian government, the population had increased to 540 individuals. Recent anti-poaching efforts have been integral to the rise in tiger numbers, with tougher punishments and the introduction of criminal charges for the illegal hunting, storage and trafficking of endangered animals and their parts. Poaching is the greatest threat to wild tigers today with tiger parts still in high demand throughout Asia. In the 1940s, the population of Amur tigers fell to just 40 animals, but the population was brought back from the brink through conservation efforts and a ban on tiger hunting. Interestingly, and worryingly, a broad genetic sampling of 95 wild Russian tigers found markedly low genetic diversity, with the effective population size extraordinarily low in comparison to the census population size; with the population behaving as if it were just 27–35 individuals. This reflects the recent population crash of the 1940s and correlated to low documented cub survivorship to independence in the Russian Far East, and the fact that more than 90% of the population occurs in the Sikhote Alin mountain region, and there is little genetic exchange (movement of Tigers) across the development corridor which separates this sub-population from the much smaller subpopulation found in southwest Primorye province. This low genetic diversity is becoming an increasing problem across a multitude of species as populations crash, and are then brought back from the brink of extinction. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo and @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #tiger #amurtiger #russia #nopoaching #notrade #conserving
User Image everydayextinction Posted: Feb 12, 2018 8:42 AM (UTC)

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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Amur tiger, Russia’s Far East - Russia’s Far East is home to 95 percent of the global population of Amur tigers; I was lucky enough to work there in 2005. A census that year showed that there were between 423 to 502 individuals. A decade later, according to an interim survey released by the russian government, the population had increased to 540 individuals. Recent anti-poaching efforts have been integral to the rise in tiger numbers, with tougher punishments and the introduction of criminal charges for the illegal hunting, storage and trafficking of endangered animals and their parts. Poaching is the greatest threat to wild tigers today with tiger parts still in high demand throughout Asia. In the 1940s, the population of Amur tigers fell to just 40 animals, but the population was brought back from the brink through conservation efforts and a ban on tiger hunting. Interestingly, and worryingly, a broad genetic sampling of 95 wild Russian tigers found markedly low genetic diversity, with the effective population size extraordinarily low in comparison to the census population size; with the population behaving as if it were just 27–35 individuals. This reflects the recent population crash of the 1940s and correlated to low documented cub survivorship to independence in the Russian Far East, and the fact that more than 90% of the population occurs in the Sikhote Alin mountain region, and there is little genetic exchange (movement of Tigers) across the development corridor which separates this sub-population from the much smaller subpopulation found in southwest Primorye province. This low genetic diversity is becoming an increasing problem across a multitude of species as populations crash, and are then brought back from the brink of extinction. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo and @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #tiger #amurtiger #russia #nopoaching #notrade #conserving
User Image wonderfulworld_photography Posted: Feb 12, 2018 8:09 AM (UTC)

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Melbourne Zoo's beautiful animals 😍
I took myself on a day trip today and met up with some cheeky and wonderful primates! But how can you resist the other spectacular animals there, especially when they pose for photos! 🐾😄
@melbourne_zoo #primates #lions #zoooutings #photography #conservation #fightingextinction #zoosvic #purebeauty #zoologist #conservationecologist #encounter #followmeformoresnaps @wonderfulworld_photography

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