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User Image drumthwacket Posted: Jan 22, 2018 12:37 PM (UTC)
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Blue beads and cowrie cloak • • “This figure of a fully developed adult actually represents a male twin who died as a child. The Yoruba people believe twins have special connections to the spiritual world. When a twin dies in childhood, a statue, called "ere ibeji," is carved as a representation and memorial. Believing that the twin's spirit lives on in the ere ibeji, the family treats the carving as if it were alive.”
> > Yoruba. Male Twin Figure with Cloak (Ere Ibeji), late 19th or early 20th century. Wood, pigment, cotton cloth, cowrie shells, glass beads, 10 3/4 x 6 3/4 x 4 1/4in. Gift of Drs. James J. Strain and Gladys Witt Strain, 2001.122.1a-b #infinitebluebkm #cowrieshells #ereibeji #yoruba #africanart #bkmafricanart #brooklynmuseumcollection @brooklynmuseum
User Image brooklynmuseum Posted: Jan 16, 2018 10:45 PM (UTC)
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A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAfricanart: Male Yoruba dancers wear gelede masks at festivals honoring the women of the community. Gelede masquerades often serve as a showcase for artistic innovation, with their masks depicting motifs that are both entertaining and critical. This mask depicts a French gendarme, a colonial soldier wearing a blue cap, and was most likely performed as a critique of French personal and political behavior during the colonial period. #infinitebluebkm 🔵 ⠀
User Image small.lisa Posted: Jan 14, 2018 2:55 PM (UTC)
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“Waist Pendant with Oba and Two Attendants,” Edo State, Benin, mid-16th to early 17th century. Copper alloy.
⭐️🇳🇬⭐️ __________________________________________________

#africanart #beauty #power #trio #africanking #beninkingdom #nigerianart #nigeria #precolonialafrica #westafricanart #beninempire #edostate #oba #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmafricanart
User Image small.lisa Posted: Sep 15, 2017 11:18 AM (UTC)
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It's hard to pick a favorite side: the front with their beautiful expressions and mirrored poses, or the back, with the contrasting and echoing #patterns of their heads, intertwined arms, and the base. (It's also so odd to see the accession number written directly on the object, which I guess was the practice in the 1920s, when it entered the collection.) ✨

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Kongo (Vili subgroup). Seated Couple, 19th century. Wood.
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#Kongo #africanart #19thcenturyart #powercouple #smiling #woodcarving #duality #pattern #africansculpture #artstagram #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmafricanart
User Image small.lisa Posted: Jul 21, 2017 7:48 PM (UTC)
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This 19th-century #wood #Lega figure, called #sakimatwemtwe or "the man with many heads," represents the qualities of equity, #wisdom, and discernment that enable its (male) owner to see all sides of an issue and have knowledge of all things going on around him.

#threeheadsarebetterthanone 👁 👁 👁

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#AfricanArt #artsofafrica #africansculpture #threeheads #Kindi #bwame #congo #beautiful #brooklynmuseum #brooklynmuseumcollection #bkmafricanart
User Image dobson_en Posted: May 18, 2017 2:04 AM (UTC)

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@brooklynmuseum
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One of the works in our extensive and historic #BKMAfricanart collection that best summarizes the spirit of Black History Month may be #OwusuAnkomah's Looking Back Into the Future. It depicts a nude man with his head turned backward, in a pose associated with the Akan proverbial concept of "sankofa" or "one must know the past to know the future.” Sankofa is a concept with a deep and resonant meaning, both in its own Akan context, and in the wider African diaspora, where it has come to symbolize a pan-African spirit of collective memory and heritage. #bhm
User Image kddumouchelle Posted: May 9, 2017 9:40 PM (UTC)
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#tbt to #AAMCNYC 2015:
#bkmafricanart install won Award for Excellence / today.
User Image brooklynmuseum Posted: May 8, 2017 9:50 PM (UTC)
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This large figure with his “heavy” pose suggests aggression, highlighted by his outsized hands, angled limbs, and severely abstracted face with a gaping mouth. It is thought that figures such as this were used by the #Chamba as protection from malevolent spirits. Find this standing male figure in #iggypoplifeclass, selected for display by artist #JeremyDeller.
User Image madkeli Posted: Apr 19, 2017 12:38 AM (UTC)

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madkeli 10M ago
Via: @brooklynmuseum - A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAfricanart: This beaded crown is the ultimate symbol of Yoruba kingship. Although the Yoruba have a long history of glassmaking, the beads used to make this crown would have been imported from the British in the late nineteenth century. At the time, glass beads were a signifier of wealth, and small European “seed beads” were particularly valued for their uniform size and color variety. Blue beads were particularly valuable because the color was not commonly found in natural materials. Worn by an oba, or king, this crown with its beaded veil serves to depersonalize the man and instead emphasizes his office. It also protects onlookers from the danger of casting their eyes directly upon the divine presence of the oba. #infinitebluebkm 🔵#art #yoruba #africanart #glass making #beads #brooklyn
User Image museum_monstaa Posted: Apr 18, 2017 5:28 PM (UTC)

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A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAfricanart: This beaded crown is the ultimate symbol of Yoruba kingship. Although the Yoruba have a long history of glassmaking, the beads used to make this crown would have been imported from the British in the late nineteenth century. At the time, glass beads were a signifier of wealth, and small European “seed beads” were particularly valued for their uniform size and color variety. Blue beads were particularly valuable because the color was not commonly found in natural materials. Worn by an oba, or king, this crown with its beaded veil serves to depersonalize the man and instead emphasizes his office. It also protects onlookers from the danger of casting their eyes directly upon the divine presence of the oba. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀
User Image brooklynmuseum Posted: Apr 18, 2017 12:21 PM (UTC)
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A little #bluesday inspiration from #BKMAfricanart: This beaded crown is the ultimate symbol of Yoruba kingship. Although the Yoruba have a long history of glassmaking, the beads used to make this crown would have been imported from the British in the late nineteenth century. At the time, glass beads were a signifier of wealth, and small European “seed beads” were particularly valued for their uniform size and color variety. Blue beads were particularly valuable because the color was not commonly found in natural materials. Worn by an oba, or king, this crown with its beaded veil serves to depersonalize the man and instead emphasizes his office. It also protects onlookers from the danger of casting their eyes directly upon the divine presence of the oba. #infinitebluebkm 🔵⠀
User Image brooklynmuseum Posted: Mar 23, 2017 1:11 PM (UTC)
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In this Fang reliquary figure, the male form is reduced to basic shapes—cylinders and circles—echoing the cylindrical reliquary box on which the figure sat. It demonstrates a distinctly different approach to the human form than the Western tradition of naturalism. The artist has accentuated some parts of the body over others, invoking Fang ideas about showing the connection between death and rebirth by combining infantile forms with more mature characteristics. Find this figure in #iggypoplifeclass, selected by artist #JeremyDeller.
User Image ftlo_geoff Posted: Mar 23, 2017 12:25 AM (UTC)

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@brooklynmuseum
・・・
One of the works in our extensive and historic #BKMAfricanart collection that best summarizes the spirit of Black History Month may be #OwusuAnkomah's Looking Back Into the Future. It depicts a nude man with his head turned backward, in a pose associated with the Akan proverbial concept of "sankofa" or "one must know the past to know the future.” Sankofa is a concept with a deep and resonant meaning, both in its own Akan context, and in the wider African diaspora, where it has come to symbolize a pan-African spirit of collective memory and heritage. #bhm
User Image unicorntampon Posted: Jan 27, 2017 4:37 PM (UTC)
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themes connecting this pair of works: fertility, source of life; nurturing gifts of the matriarch; servitude and submission under a western gaze #bkmafricanart @brooklynmuseum
User Image susaninprogress Posted: Jan 7, 2017 5:55 PM (UTC)

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User Image susaninprogress Posted: Jan 7, 2017 5:44 PM (UTC)

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Make chairs, not war

Gonçalo Mabunda's "Harmony" chair is made from decommissioned bullets and munitions left over from the 7 million munitions from the 1992 Mozambique civil war. #gonçalomabunda #bkmafricanart #chair #war #guns #art #sculpture #✌🏽
User Image brooklynmuseum Posted: Dec 21, 2016 11:04 PM (UTC)
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Scholars are still debating this! Some believe they are scarification marks, other scholars speculate represent body paint, since both scarification and face painting in certain ritual contexts was common in many parts of Nigeria into the early 20th century. However, there is no evidence of what kind of body marks were in fashion when these objects were made or who would have had these marks. Whatever the intended purpose to these lines, we can surmise that they may have been markers of identity, signifying a place of origin, status, or membership in a certain organization. Have a question on your next visit at the Museum? Download our #askbkm app and ask away.
User Image brooklynmuseum Posted: Oct 19, 2016 8:54 PM (UTC)
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This Kuosi Society mask would have been worn in a Bamileke masquerade. You may notice from the round ears and the trunk-like flaps that this mask is meant to resemble the head of an elephant. Elephants and beadwork are symbols of political power in the Cameroon grasslands, where this piece was made. The person who wore this would have also worn a complete costume including a long tunic and a headdress. Have a question on your next visit at the Museum? Download our #askbkm app and ask away.