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#BlackHoleFriday2,828 POSTS

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User Image firouz_nasa Posted: Jan 19, 2018 5:25 PM (UTC)

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What happens when two supermassive black holes collide? Until last year, we weren’t quite sure. Gravitational waves!
Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time originally predicted by Albert Einstein more than 100 years ago, but confirmed for the first time in 2016 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). To date, LIGO has made four detections of gravitational waves emanating from the mergers of black holes. Einstein pictured these waves as ripples in the fabric of space-time produced by massive, accelerating bodies, such as black holes orbiting each other.
Credit: SXS
#nasa #space #gravitationalwaves #gravity #spacetime #einstein #waves #ripples #blackfriday #blackholes #blackhole #blackholefriday #collide
User Image 4ndre691 Posted: Jan 18, 2018 11:22 PM (UTC)

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#universo
#Rensta #Repost: @nasahubble via @renstapp ···
“ Shopping for #BlackHoleFriday images? Hubble's got disks of debris fueling black holes, jets shooting from black holes near the speed of light, and shock collisions in black hole jets!

Credit: NASA/Hubble
#NASA #Hubble #space #science #astronomy #universe #telescope #cosmos #blackholes #blackfriday
User Image piyushbhoir45 Posted: Jan 14, 2018 1:41 AM (UTC)

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Do the #BlackFriday lines suck? We’re asking the same question about black holes...why do they suck...or do they?
There are many cultural myths concerning black holes. They have been portrayed as time-traveling tunnels to another dimension, or as cosmic vacuum cleaners sucking up everything in sight. Black holes are really just the evolutionary end points of massive stars. At a distance, black holes really don’t have more gravity than normal objects, so at a distance they really won’t suck things in any more than a normal object at the same mass.
Credit: NASA/Dana Berry/Sky Works Digital
#nasa #space #blackfriday #blackholefriday #friday #blackhole #blackholes #light #star #explosion #mass #annual #facts
User Image nasaair Posted: Jan 13, 2018 3:41 AM (UTC)

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Cygnus X-1: A stellar-mass black hole in orbit with a companion star located about 6,000 light years from Earth. On the left, an optical image from the Digitized Sky Survey shows Cygnus X-1, outlined in a red box. Cygnus X-1 is located near large active regions of star formation in the Milky Way, as seen in this image that spans some 700 light years across. An artist’s illustration on the right depicts what astronomers think is happening within the Cygnus X-1 system. Cygnus X-1 is a so-called stellar-mass black hole, a class of black holes that comes from the collapse of a massive star. New studies with data from Chandra and several other telescopes have determined the black hole’s spin, mass, and distance with unprecedented accuracy. (Credit: Optical: DSS; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss)

http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/cygx1/

#nasa #chandra #chandraxray#nasachandraxray#chandraxrayobservatory #CXC#smithsonian #xray #universe #cosmos#space #science #astronomy#astrophysics #astrogram #spacegram #NASAgram #learn #wow #star #stars #electrons #blackholes #blackholefriday
User Image piyushbhoir45 Posted: Jan 12, 2018 3:31 PM (UTC)

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What happens when two supermassive black holes collide? Until last year, we weren’t quite sure. Gravitational waves!
Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time originally predicted by Albert Einstein more than 100 years ago, but confirmed for the first time in 2016 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). To date, LIGO has made four detections of gravitational waves emanating from the mergers of black holes. Einstein pictured these waves as ripples in the fabric of space-time produced by massive, accelerating bodies, such as black holes orbiting each other.
Credit: SXS
#nasa #space #gravitationalwaves #gravity #spacetime #einstein #waves #ripples #blackfriday #blackholes #blackhole #blackholefriday #collide
User Image organizedmind Posted: Jan 10, 2018 7:16 AM (UTC)

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@Regranned from @nasaames - Einstein predicted their existence a century ago. But it wasn’t until 2015 that scientists detected gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes. This supercomputer simulation shows what happens when two black holes become one. In the video, the two black holes are shown as dark spheres. The yellow lobes indicate the gravity associated with each object. As the black holes spiral inward at high speed, they generate powerful gravitational waves (red, gold) that radiate outward. The simulation was performed on the Pleiades supercomputer at NASA's Ames Research Center (@nasaames) in California’s Silicon Valley.
More info: https://go.nasa.gov/2A6xZBb
Video credit: NASA/GSFC/UMBC/Bernard J. Kelly, NASA/Ames/Chris Henze, CSC Government Solutions LLC/Tim Sandstrom
#nasa #ames #nasasiliconvalley #supercomputer #simulation #pleiades #blackhole #merger #gravitationalwaves #blackholefriday - #regrann
User Image grandeur_airways Posted: Jan 5, 2018 2:01 PM (UTC)

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#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
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Devouring the crazy #BlackFriday deals? This supermassive black hole is devouring a glowing stream of material from a star! Supermassive black holes, with their immense gravitational pull, are notoriously good at clearing out their immediate surroundings by eating nearby objects. When a star passes within a certain distance of a black hole, the stellar material gets stretched and compressed -- or “spaghettified” -- as the black hole swallows it.
A black hole destroying a star, an event called “stellar tidal disruption,” releases an enormous amount of energy, brightening the surroundings in an event called a flare. Thanks to our Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we now have new insights into these flares.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
#nasa #space #blackhole #blackholefriday #friday #blackhole #blackholes #light #star #explosion #mass #annual #facts #wise #stellar #tidal #disruption
User Image alldolltime Posted: Jan 2, 2018 1:38 PM (UTC)

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#agdolldiarymomgiveaway This image of Markarian 231 really caught our attention! This image was part of @nasa #BlackHoleFriday. What a creative way to celebrate Black Friday 👍🌠 @agdolldiarymom
User Image tmbw2 Posted: Dec 31, 2017 12:00 PM (UTC)

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tmbw2 3w ago
#blackholefriday black holes are really just the evolutionary end points of massive stars at a distance black holes really don’t have more gravity than normal objects so at a distance they really won’t suck things in any more than a normal object in the same mass
User Image taurus.mm Posted: Dec 30, 2017 12:42 PM (UTC)

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@nasa
Do the #BlackFriday lines suck? We’re asking the same question about black holes...why do they suck...or do they?
There are many cultural myths concerning black holes. They have been portrayed as time-traveling tunnels to another dimension, or as cosmic vacuum cleaners sucking up everything in sight. Black holes are really just the evolutionary end points of massive stars. At a distance, black holes really don’t have more gravity than normal objects, so at a distance they really won’t suck things in any more than a normal object at the same mass.
Credit: NASA/Dana Berry/Sky Works Digital
#nasa #space #blackfriday #blackholefriday #friday #blackhole #blackholes #light #star #explosion #mass #annual #facts
User Image spacevidio Posted: Dec 25, 2017 10:10 AM (UTC)

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Devouring the crazy #BlackFriday deals? This supermassive black hole is devouring a glowing stream of material from a star! Supermassive black holes, with their immense gravitational pull, are notoriously good at clearing out their immediate surroundings by eating nearby objects. When a star passes within a certain distance of a black hole, the stellar material gets stretched and compressed -- or “spaghettified” -- as the black hole swallows it.
A black hole destroying a star, an event called “stellar tidal disruption,” releases an enormous amount of energy, brightening the surroundings in an event called a flare. Thanks to our Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we now have new insights into these flares. 📷Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
#nasa #space #blackhole #blackholefriday #friday #blackhole #blackholes #light #star #explosion #mass #annual #facts #wise #stellar #tidal #disruption
User Image soulradiancehealing Posted: Dec 22, 2017 7:10 PM (UTC)

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#blackholefriday #nasa #hafiz #scienceandspirituality “Now is the time to understand That all your ideas of right and wrong Were just a child’s training wheels to be laid aside When you finally live with veracity And love.” – Hafez ✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨“Remember for just one minute of the day, it would be best to try looking upon yourself more as God does, for She knows your true royal nature.” – Hafez🌙🌙🌙✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨🏮 "Let tenderness pour from your eyes, the way sun gazes warmly on earth.” – Hafez
User Image inwaa__ Posted: Dec 21, 2017 5:58 PM (UTC)

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Photo credit to @bosplanet via @GPRepostApp for Android
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#BlackHoleFriday This hypernova explosion 💥 , with a mass of 70 quadrillion Earths, created the youngest black hole formed in the Milky Way #galaxy, only 1,000 years old! - there are about 300 million interstellar black holes in our Galaxy alone. 📸: #NASA - @nasachandraxray
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#cosmos #universe #galaxy #galaxy #astrophotography #physics #astrophysics #supernova #science #space #blackfriday