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  Posted: Jul 24, 2012 9:59 PM
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npr 5y ago
Elton John pays NPR a visit

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User Image npr Posted: Nov 19, 2017 3:05 PM (UTC)
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npr 8m ago
About half of the youth who dealt with homelessness, experienced it for the first time, and those numbers are growing, according to the study. Schools are often at the front line of this issue. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @chris.kindred | Chris Kindred for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 18, 2017 7:23 PM (UTC)
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npr 19h ago
Grapes have been growing along the steep slopes of Germany's Mosel River for centuries. Across Europe, hotter temperatures are reshaping the wine industry. In southern Spain and Italy, growers worry the heat will dry out their vines. In Germany, warming has been a blessing, and it comes as Riesling enjoys a renaissance, especially among American drinkers. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @daniellaches | Daniella Cheslow for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 17, 2017 2:30 PM (UTC)
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npr 2d ago
The complaints came in shortly after we ran a story on a government aid program that gave cash to the poor in Zambia. The piece included a profile of a young woman who, along with her husband, had used the money to start a business that had lifted their family to a level self-sufficiency they'd never enjoyed before. Several readers — okay, just two, but still, it made us take note! — wrote to take issue with my use of the word "hut" to describe the family's dwelling.⠀

It's important to be sensitive to the way Africa has been historically portrayed in the Western world, opined Dixon Chibanda, a psychiatrist from Zimbabwe. And too often, he said, "the word 'hut' has been associated not only with poverty, but with an inferior type of lifestyle." Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @malakagharib | Malaka Gharib/NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 16, 2017 4:57 PM (UTC)
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npr 2d ago
Brightly colored hijabs line the walls of Si.Se.Sa., an upscale fashion boutique in Jakarta, Indonesia. It's named for the three sisters who own the shop — Siriz, Senaz and Sansa, all in their 30s. They specialize in modest syar'i or "Shariah compliant" fashion and say they follow in the footsteps of their mother, also a designer.

Swarovski crystals are featured in many of the store's designs. "In every country, they have their own identity, their own DNA," says Benedicta Citro, an Italian designer and Swarovski's representative. "So, for instance, in Indonesia, they're very colorful. They are very conservative in terms of cut, but lots of bright colors." 1. Boutique owners and sisters Sansa (left) and Senaz (center) examine swatches of material and designs shown by Citro (right).
2. Senaz examines a colorful design brought by Citro. 
3.  Senaz says she and her siblings follow in their mother's footsteps as fashion designers.
4. An interior view of the Si.Se.Sa. boutique in Jakarta

Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @claireeclaire | Claire Harbage/NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 15, 2017 10:05 PM (UTC)
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npr 3d ago
Jeff Melton (left) and Adrian Rohr, friends and pro wrestling super fans, greet each other with "too sweet," a gesture known to pro wrestling fans as a way of saying hello or acknowledging something positive. As part of Morning Edition's exploration of how fandoms help shape identity, our producers spent a night amid the smoke, strobes, spandex and screaming fans at a pro wrestling match with Melton and Rohr.⠀

For Melton, wrestling offers not only an escape from stress but also a way to connect — with other wrestling fans like Rohr as well as with the storylines in the ring. Follow the link in our bio to hear Melton describe his love of wrestling. (Credit: @claireclaire and @pmvickers | Photo illustration by Claire Harbage/NPR and Paige Vickers for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 15, 2017 5:00 PM (UTC)
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npr 3d ago
“Natural flavor” and “artificial flavor” appear as ingredients in the nutrition labels of all kinds of foods. But what, exactly, is the difference between them? It turns out the biggest distinction may be in the marketing. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @feever_dreem | Joy Ho for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 14, 2017 11:48 PM (UTC)
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npr 4d ago
Becoming a fan of something often means becoming a part of a community. And finding that group of like-minded people can feel like finding a place you truly belong. Other times, that community isn't all that welcoming.⠀

As part of 'Morning Edition’s' exploration of fandoms, we profile Stephanie Williams about her love of comics. Williams, who lives in Charlotte, N.C., says her fandom has shaped many phases of her identity: teenager full of angst, a new mom emerging from the fog of postpartum depression, and now, as a strong African-American woman and parent. Follow the link in our bio to hear Stephanie describe her love of comics. (Credit: @claireclaire and @pmvickers | Photo illustration by Claire Harbage/NPR and Paige Vickers for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 14, 2017 4:04 PM (UTC)
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npr 4d ago
A new high school in Washington, D.C., brings a radical approach to discipline — including allowing cursing by students. Should that behavior be tolerated? Or punished? Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @jaimeljacob | Jaime Jacob for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 13, 2017 4:49 PM (UTC)
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npr 5d ago
As home to 250 million people speaking hundreds of languages and spanning some 17,000 islands in an area as wide as the continental U.S., Indonesia is one of the most populous and diverse countries in the world.

The country is about 88 percent Muslim, and it is also home to Christians, Buddhists, Hindus and Confucians. It's a place that prides itself on diversity and sees it as a source of strength. "We cannot afford not to have this diversity," says Budi Bowoleksono, Indonesia's ambassador to the United States.

The country's founding philosophy, "Pancasila," includes the notions of unity and social justice for all. Religion, politics and culture hold the country together — but there are growing concerns that the country is becoming less tolerant than it used to be.

1) People worship at noon prayers at Jakarta's Istiqlal mosque, the largest mosque in Southeast Asia.
2) Band members practice twirling flags at Istiqlal mosque. 
3) People visit St. Mary of the Assumption Cathedral across the street from the mosque. 
4) A Hindu shrine on a Bali beach.
5)  People light incense at the 17th century Vihara Dharma Bhakti Buddhist temple in a mostly Chinese neighborhood in Jakarta.
6) The Borobudur temple, a UNESCO World Heritage Site dating to the eighth and ninth centuries, is located in central Java.

Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @claireeclaire | Claire Harbage/NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 12, 2017 3:16 PM (UTC)
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npr 6d ago
A simple, scalable program — founded by Dolly Parton — reaches kids before they enter school: You sign up and get a free book in the mail every month until your child turns 5. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: LA Johnson/NPR) #📚
User Image npr Posted: Nov 11, 2017 3:39 PM (UTC)
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npr 1w ago
There are more than 21 million military veterans in the country, according to a 2016 report from the Department of Veteran Affairs. About 2 million of those are women, like Muriel Kupersmith, 94, who served in the Marine Corps from 1944-46. In commemoration of Veterans Day, NPR spoke with six women veterans living at the Armed Forces Retirement Home in Washington, D.C., to find out what their service means to them. Check out our Story for more photos. (Credit: @jkerriganphoto | Jennifer Kerrigan/NPR) #veteransday
User Image npr Posted: Nov 10, 2017 4:02 PM (UTC)
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When Dr. Agnes Binagwaho was a "little mouse," the Rwandan pediatrician tried to make as much noise as a lion. Now as a global health activist, she's learning to make change "without screaming too much." Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @carolynannrogers | Carolyn Rogers/NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 9, 2017 9:43 PM (UTC)
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npr 1w ago
Yerianne Roldán, 17, and her sister Darianne, 16, arrived in Orlando from western Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Darianne says the first days here were the hardest. "In my mind, I was like, 'OK, this is only temporary. I'm only going to stay here for a month and then I'm going back.' " But that's not what happened and their family is not alone: Schools in Orlando have enrolled nearly 2,000 Puerto Rican students who've fled the storm-ravaged island. Most don't know when or if they'll ever go back. Their future is in limbo and the uncertainty and stress have taken a toll on just about everybody. Check out our Story for more photos. (Credit: @elissanad | Elissa Nadworny for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 9, 2017 3:25 PM (UTC)
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npr 1w ago
One in four students report being bullied, but not all say they are bullied the same way. A recent national survey asked students about how they experience bullying in order to help educators try to stop it. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @riinjay | Ryan Johnson for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 8, 2017 7:35 PM (UTC)
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npr 1w ago
The slow ferry churns over the waves between Bali and Lombok, two islands of the 17,000 or so that make up Indonesia. The public ferries of Indonesia are part of the connective tissue that keeps this diverse country together. Religious and ethnic tensions have no place here.
The journey of almost 50 miles costs $3.40 and takes about four hours, sometimes longer. Tourists favor the more expensive fast boat that takes less than half the time, but the passengers on this vessel are almost all local — doing business, visiting relatives, going on vacation.
Between the islands, with little to no cellphone reception, people put aside their regular lives and spend the ride at ease, dozing or gazing into the deep blue water of the Bali Sea. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @claireeclaire | Claire Harbage/NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 7, 2017 9:38 PM (UTC)
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npr 1w ago
It’s been one year since Donald Trump gave his election night victory speech. How is the country's economic growth? And what about all those people Trump thanked for getting him across the finish line? NPR adds context and analysis to the president's election night remarks. Follow the link in our bio to see the annotated speech. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 7, 2017 3:16 PM (UTC)
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npr 1w ago
Indonesia's founding philosophy includes the notions of unity and social justice for all. But there are growing concerns that the country is becoming less tolerant than it once was.

In a dimly lit crypt in Yogyakarta, Wahjudi Djaja (seen in the first and second images) kneels in front of a tomb and sprinkles flowers on the grave as he whispers a prayer. He practices a Javanese religion called Kejawen, also known as Kebatinan, whose rituals involve amulets and a figure known as the Queen of the South Sea.

Hastono Wasiyo, 60 (seen in the fourth image), is a gravedigger and caretaker at the Kejawen cemetery. Mas Bekel Hastono Darwinto, 61 (seen in the final image), is the main caretaker of the Kejawen graveyard. Both men clean and maintain the area. In the afternoon, they sit just outside the cemetery in a wooden shed, sharing pieces of cassava.

A day before, Djaja says, his fellow worshippers were conducting a ritual in the local river when a group of hard-line Muslims showed up and tried to block them. That kind of confrontation is increasingly common, he says, and it worries him. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @claireeclaire | Claire Harbage/NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 6, 2017 6:33 PM (UTC)
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npr 1w ago
After visiting a remote village in Uganda, Stanford scientist Manu Prakash needed to find a way to diagnose malaria without electricity. So he turned to an unusual place for inspiration: toys. He compared the spinning speeds of yo-yos, tops, fidget spinners, until finally landing on the whirligig. It spun incredibly fast, matching the speeds of many lab centrifuges. Check out the profile link for the full story. (Credit: @Arthuranimation | Benjamin Arthur for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 5, 2017 4:17 PM (UTC)
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Renny Kudakwashe Mukwavaya, who lives in Harare, Zimbabwe, was 29 when her husband died. Mukwavaya is still heartbroken, both because she never had the chance to say goodbye — and because of what happened next. Her husband went missing in January 2014 and then found drowned in a well three days later. Authorities suspected that he committed suicide but her in-laws did not agree: "His relatives began to accuse me of killing him, saying I had done it to take ownership of the house," she says. The accusations worsened her grief. "I was in so much pain, asking why he had to commit suicide," she says. ""But there was no one to give me the answers." ⠀

Dr. Sekai Martha Nhiwatiwa, a psychiatrist based in Harare, says that while local culture is rich with traditions and support systems for the bereaved, some local customs are challenging during the grieving process. The community believes that it's important for widows to speak openly about their grief in church settings and with neighbors. Health authorities are also experimenting with programs that offer grief counseling in public spaces. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @lilypadula | Lily Padula for NPR)
User Image npr Posted: Nov 4, 2017 5:28 PM (UTC)
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npr 2w ago
In 1992, Steve Ells was a classically trained chef working in a high-end restaurant in San Francisco. But after eating a burrito at a local taqueria, he got an idea: to sell burritos and earn enough money to open his own gourmet restaurant. The first Chipotle opened in Denver the following year. Bringing his culinary training to taqueria-style service, Steve Ells helped transform the way we eat fast food. Follow the link in our bio to hear the full episode from the How I Built This podcast. (Credit: @connorplz | Connor Heckert for NPR)