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  •   raiseitup01 Do u windowsill grow? 3h
  •   gonzoswitchblade @raiseitup01 all my nepenthes are windowsill grown. I have a couple under lights. 48min
  •   raiseitup01 Nice man! Me too! Where r u located? 44min
  •   raiseitup01 How do u get nighttime drops? Or is it all lowlands that u grow? 44min
  •   gonzoswitchblade @raiseitup01 I'm in oakland cali. It drops to the low 50's at night. My lowland plants sit on a heating pad. A friend of mine freezes a bottle of water and places it with his nepenthes at night. I'm not sure it would make that much of a difference with my setup though. 4min

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thecarnivoregirl Lynda Butt x (moorei x flava atro) seedling looking like a baby dinosaur! Seeds came from @sarraceniacrazy! More photos on the blog! Click the link in my profile! 5h

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kenny_cpl My girlfriends favorite nepenthes.. I hated it at first but now it's growing on me haha @ohitsjosie #nepenthes #nature #pitcherplant #plantnerd #carnivorousplants #savagegarden 6h
  •   bigpoppakeep Glabrata? 6h
  •   bigpoppakeep Can't wait until mines in upper pitcher mode. They look dope. I like em Cuz the plant looks a lot different than normal. More umbrella'y' if that makes sense 6h

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Normal Kendrick Alejandre
kenny_cpl Very pretty hybrid! S. (Leucophylla x Flava) x Leucophylla
#sarracenia #pitcherplant #plantnerd #nature #carnivorousplants #savagegarden
6h

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ajdavid89 Carnivorous plants are probably the coolest solution to a mosquito problem #garden #carnivorousplant #pitcherplant #nepenthe 8h

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colorado_mermaid This one's doing pretty well too! For $5 spent at Home Depot on some little kits, I'd say it was well worth it! #pitcherplant #venusflytrap #carnivore #carnivorousplants #plantnerd #crazyplantlady 9h

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niamhrayne_ Picked up the most adorable carnivorous mix today from The Garden on Cows Lane. Venus flytrap + pitcher plant. I'm not even embarrassed by how excited I am about this #carnivorousmix #venusflytrap #pitcherplant 10h

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leticiainoe #pitcherplant #nature Pitcher plants are several different carnivorous plants that have evolved modified leaves known as a pitfall traps – a prey-trapping mechanism featuring a deep cavity filled with liquid. 10h

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mustafagulistanavsar #RajahPitcher
#NepenthesRajah
#MountKinabalu
#EndangeredSeria
#BorneoSeria
#CarnivorousPlants #CarnivorousPlantsSeria #Nepenthes #食虫植物 #猪笼草 #NepenthesSeria #CarnivorousPlants #PitcherPlant

Nepenthes

A rosette plant of
NepenthesPeltata growing on Mount Hamiguitan, Mindanao, Philippines
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
#PlantaeSeria
(unranked):
#AngiospermsSeria
(unranked):
#EudicotsSeria
(unranked):
#CoreEudicotsSeria
Order:
#CaryophyllalesSeria
Family:
#NepenthaceaeSeria
Dumort.
Genus:
#NepenthesSeria
Species
See below or separate list.
Diversity
150+ species
Synonyms
#Anurosperma Hallier f.
#Bandura Adans.
#Phyllamphora Lour.

Photo taken by @christianziegler in #Sabah / #Borneo.

Big lick: Rajah’s pitcher plant (Nepenthes rajah), has the largest of all pitchers, with up to 3 liters content. The species is endemic to higher elevations of the Mt. Kinabalu area and listed as endangered in the IUCN red list.

This pitcher plant species has a
mutualistic relationship with some small mammals, especially the mountain tree shrew: the plant offers nectar from glands on it’s lid, which is frequently licked off by the tree shrews in the daytime and some nocturnal rat species at night. While licking, the mammals frequently defecate into the pitcher thus supplying the plant with much needed phosphorus and nitrogen. A beautiful example for the evolution of a mutualism.

Part of a story that I am posting in more detail on @ christianziegler.
@ thephotosociety @ natgeocreative @ iLCP_photographers # rainforest # conservation # jungle # ecology # mutualism

#march29mart2015
#PazarMartSeria
#Pazar2015seria
#Mart2015seria
#Mart29seria
#PazarSeria
10h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Flacourt called the plant Amramatico, after a local name. More than a century later, this species was formally described as N. madagascariensis
    The second species to be described was N. distillatoria, the Sri Lankan endemic. In 1677, Danish physician Thomas Bartholin made brief mention of it under the name Miranda herba, Latin for "marvellous herb". Three years later, Dutch merchant Jacob Breyne referred to this species as Bandura zingalensium, after a local name for the plant. Bandura subsequently became the most commonly used name for the tropical pitcher plants, until Linnaeus coined Nepenthes in 1737.
    Nepenthes distillatoria was again described in 1683, this time by Swedish physician and naturalist Herman Niklas Grim. Grim called it Planta mirabilis destillatoria or the "miraculous distilling plant", and was the first to clearly illustrate a tropical pitcher plant. Three years later, in 1686, English naturalist John Ray quoted Grim as saying:
    The root draws up moisture from the earth which with the help of the sun's rays rises up into the plant itself and then flows down through the stems and nerves of the leaves into the natural utensil to be stored there until used for human needs. [translated from Latin in Pitcher-
    Plants of Borneo
    One of the earliest illustrations of Nepenthes appears in Leonard Plukenet's Almagestum Botanicum of 1696. The plant, called Utricaria vegetabilis zeylanensium, is undoubtedly N. distillatoria. 6h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Cantharifera as illustrated in Rumphius's Herbarium Amboinensis, Volume 5, published in 1747, although probably drawn in the late 17th century. The vine on the right is not a Nepenthes, but a species of Flagellaria.
    Around the same time, German botanist Georg Eberhard Rumphius discovered two new Nepenthes species in the Malay Archipelago. Rumphius illustrated the first one, now considered synonymous with N. mirabilis, and gave it the name Cantharifera, meaning "tankard-bearer". The second, referred to as Cantharifera alba, is thought to have been N. maxima. Rumphius described the plants in his most famous work, the six-volume Herbarium Amboinense, a catalogue of the flora of Ambon Island. However, it would not be published until many years after his death.
    After going blind in 1670, when the manuscript was only partially complete, Rumphius continued work on Herbarium Amboinensis with the help of clerks and artists. In 1687, with the project nearing completion, at least half of the illustrations were lost in a fire. Persevering, Rumphius and his helpers first completed the book in 1690. However, two years later, the ship carrying the manuscript to the Netherlands was attacked and sunk by the French, forcing them to start over from a copy that had fortunately been retained by Governor-General Johannes Camphuijs. The Herbarium Amboinensis finally arrived in the Netherlands in 1696. Even then, the first volume did not appear until 1741, 39 years after Rumphius's death. By this time, Linnaeus's name Nepenthes had become established. 6h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Illustration of Bandura zeylanica (N. distillatoria) from Burmann's Thesaurus Zeylanicus of 1737
    Nepenthes distillatoria was again illustrated in Johannes Burmann's Thesaurus Zeylanicus of 1737. The drawing depicts the end of a flowering stem with pitchers. Burmann refers to the plant as Bandura zeylanica.
    The next mention of tropical pitcher plants was made in 1790, when Portuguese priest João de Loureiro described Phyllamphora mirabilis, or the "marvellous urn-shaped leaf", from Vietnam. Despite living in the country for around 35 years, it seems unlikely that Loureiro observed living plants of this species, as he stated the lid is a moving part, actively opening and closing. In his most celebrated work, Flora Cochinchinensis, he writes:
    [...] (the) leaf-tip ends in a long hanging tendril, twisted spirally in the middle, from which hangs a sort of vase, oblong, pot-bellied, with a smooth lip with a projecting margin and a lid affixed to one side, which of its own nature freely opens and closes in order to receive the dew and store it. A marvellous work of the Lord! [translated from French in Pitcher-Plants of Borneo

    Phyllamphora mirabilis was eventually transferred to the genus Nepenthes by Rafarin in 1869. As such, P. mirabilis is the basionym of this most cosmopolitan of tropical pitcher plant species.
    Loureiro's description of a moving lid was repeated by Jean Louis Marie Poiret in 1797. 6h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Poiret described two of the four Nepenthes species known at the time:
    N. madagascariensis and N. distillatoria. He gave the former its current name and called the latter Nepente de l'Inde, or simply "Nepenthes of India", although this species is absent from the mainland. In Jean-Baptiste Lamarck's Encyclopédie Méthodique Botanique, he included the following account:
    This urn is hollow, as I have just said, usually full of soft, clear water, and then closed. It opens during the day and more than half the liquid disappears, but this loss is repaired during the night, and the next day the urn is full again and closed by its lid. This is its sustenance, and enough for more than one day because it is always about half-full at the approach of night. [translated from French in Pitcher-Plants of Borneo

    The Nepenthes house of the Veitch Nurseries as illustrated in The Gardeners' Chronicle, 1872
    With the discovery of new species and Sir Joseph Banks' original introduction of specimens to Europe in 1789, interest in Nepenthes grew throughout the 19th century, culminating in what has been called the "Golden Age of Nepenthes" in the 1880s. However, the popularity of the plants dwindled in the early 20th century, before all but disappearing by World War II. This is evidenced by the fact that no new species were described between 1940 and 1966. The revival of global interest in the cultivation and study of Nepenthes is credited to Japanese botanist Shigeo Kurata, whose work in the 1960s and 1970s did much to bring attention to these plants. 6h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Etymology
    The name Nepenthes was first published in 1737 in Carolus Linnaeus's Hortus Cliffortianus It references a passage in Homer's Odyssey, in which the potion "Nepenthes pharmakon" is given to Helen by an Egyptian queen. "Nepenthe" literally means "without grief" (ne = not, penthos = grief) and, in Greek mythology, is a drug that quells all sorrows with forgetfulness. Linnaeus explained:
    If this is not Helen's Nepenthes, it certainly will be for all botanists. What botanist would not be filled with admiration if, after a long journey, he should find this wonderful plant. In his astonishment past ills would be forgotten when beholding this admirable work of the Creator! [translated from Latin by Harry Veitch
    The plant Linnaeus described was
    N. distillatoria, a species from Sri Lanka.
    Nepenthes was formally published as a generic name in 1753 in Linnaeus's famous Species Plantarum, which established botanical nomenclature as it exists today. Nepenthes distillatoria is the type species of the genus.

    Nepenthes from Carolus Linnaeus's Species Plantarum of 1753
    The name "monkey cups" was discussed in the May 1964 issue of National Geographic, in which Paul A. Zahl wrote:
    The carriers called them "monkey cups," a name I had heard elsewhere in reference to Nepenthes, but the implication that monkeys drink the pitcher fluid seemed farfetched. I later proved it true. In Sarawak I found an orangutan that had been raised as a pet and later freed. As I approached it gingerly in the forest, I offered it a half-full pitcher. To my surprise, the ape accepted it and, with the finesse of a lady at tea, executed a delicate bottoms-up.
    In Indonesia the plants are often called kantong semar or "Semar's pocket". 6h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Cultivation

    Cultivated Nepenthes rajah and other species
    Nepenthes may be cultivated in greenhouses. Easier species include
    N. alata
    N. ventricosa
    N. khasiana, and
    N. sanguinea. These four species are highlanders (N. alata has both lowland and highland forms), some easy lowlander species are
    N. rafflesiana
    N. bicalcarata
    N. mirabilis, and
    N. hirsuta.
    Highland forms are those species that grow in habitats generally higher in elevation, and thus exposed to cooler evening temperatures. Lowland forms are those species growing nearer to sea level. Both forms respond best to rainwater (but some tap water works as long as it is flushed monthly with rainwater or water low in dissolved solid and chemicals), bright light (though some species can grow in full sun), a well-drained medium, good air circulation and relatively high humidity, although easier species such as N. alata can adapt to lower humidity environments. Highland species must have night-time cooling to thrive in the long term. Chemical fertilisers are best used at low strength. Occasional feeding with frozen (thawed before use) crickets may be beneficial. Terrarium culture of smaller plants, such as N. bellii, N. × trichocarpa and N. ampullaria, is possible, but most plants will get too large over time. 6h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Plants can be propagated by seed, cuttings, and tissue culture. Seeds are usually sown on damp chopped Sphagnum moss, or on sterile plant tissue culture media once they have been properly disinfected. The seeds generally become nonviable soon after harvesting, so seed are not usually the preferred method of propagation. A 1:1 mixture of orchid medium with moss or perlite has been used for germination and culture. Seed may take two months to germinate, and two years or more to yield mature plants. Cuttings may be rooted in damp Sphagnum moss in a plastic bag or tank with high humidity and moderate light. They can begin to root in one to two months and start to form pitchers in about six months. Tissue culture is now used commercially and helps reduce collection of wild plants, as well as making many rare species available to hobbyists at reasonable prices. Nepenthes species are considered threatened or endangered plants and are listed in CITES appendices 1 and 2.

    Species
    Main articles: List of Nepenthes species and List of Nepenthes species by distribution
    Around 160 species of Nepenthes are currently recognised as valid. This number is quickly increasing, with several new species being described each year.
    Hybrids and cultivars

    The complex man-made hybrid N. ventricosa ×
    (N. lowii × N. macrophylla)
    See also: List of Nepenthes natural hybrids and List of Nepenthes cultivars
    There are many hybrid Nepenthes and numerous named cultivars. Some of the more well-known, artificially produced hybrids and cultivars include:
    N. × coccinea
    ((N. rafflesiana × N. ampullaria) × N. mirabilis)
    N. × mixta
    (N. northiana × N. maxima)
    N. 'Emmarene
    (N. khasiana × N. ventricosa)
    N. 'Judith Finn
    (N. spathulata × N. veitchii) 6h
  •   mustafagulistanavsar Species
    Main articles: List of Nepenthes species and List of Nepenthes species by distribution
    Around 160 species of Nepenthes are currently recognised as valid. This number is quickly increasing, with several new species being described each year.
    Hybrids and cultivars

    The complex man-made hybrid N. ventricosa ×
    (N. lowii × N. macrophylla)
    See also: List of Nepenthes natural hybrids and List of Nepenthes cultivars
    There are many hybrid Nepenthes and numerous named cultivars. Some of the more well-known, artificially produced hybrids and cultivars include:
    N. × coccinea
    ((N. rafflesiana × N. ampullaria) × N. mirabilis)
    N. × mixta
    (N. northiana × N. maxima)
    N. 'Emmarene
    (N. khasiana × N. ventricosa)
    N. 'Judith Finn
    (N. spathulata × N. veitchii) 6h

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Normal Cactus Jungle

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