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Normal ALiti Environment

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erinhamlin You know you're golfing in the #ADK's when... #naturalhazards #beaversandbunkers 1mon

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2mon andrew__mo
Valencia Andrew Mo

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2mon usgs
Normal U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
usgs Grand Prismatic Spring — This colorful hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, located in Midway Geyser Basin, is the largest hot spring in the United States and the third largest in the world. It's approximately 370 feet (112.8 m) in diameter and 121 feet (37 m) deep. It's rich color is the result of thermophilic (“heat loving”) organisms living along the edges of the hot spring, whose​ ​colors change throughout the seasons.​ ​Hot springs, like Grand Prismatic, are fueled by heat from a large reservoir of partially molten rock (magma), just a few miles beneath Yellowstone, that drives one of the world’s largest volcanic systems. ​ Photo Credit: Thanks to Ann-Marie Mair (@ringlitephotography on Flickr) for sharing this with us!​ #USGS #science #volcano #naturalhazards #Yellowstone #hotsprings #NationalParks #landscapes 2mon

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pnsn1 Mount Rainier in the Pacific Northwest.
#Repost from @usgs --- Mount Rainier — Nothing better than just a simply beautiful view of Mount Rainier from Reflection Lake. Mount Rainier, the highest peak in the Cascade Range at 4,392m (14,410 ft), forms a dramatic backdrop to the Puget Sound region. During an eruption 5,600 years ago the once-higher edifice ​ ​collapsed to form a large crater open to the northeast much like that at Mount St. Helens after 1980. Ensuing eruptions rebuilt the summit, filling the large collapse crater. Large lahars (volcanic mudflows) from eruptions and from collapses of this massive, heavily glaciated andesitic volcano have reached as far as the Puget Sound lowlands.
Since the last ice age, several dozen explosive eruptions spread​ ​tephra (ash, pumice) across parts of Washington. The last magmatic eruption was about 1,000 years ago. Extensive hydrothermal alteration of the upper portion of the volcano has contributed to its structural weakness promoting collapse. An active thermal system driven by magma deep under the volcano has melted out a labyrinth of steam caves beneath the summit icecap.

Photo Credit: Alan Cressler (alan_cressler on Flickr) ​

#USGS #science #volcano #MtRainier #MountRainier #naturalhazards #​landscape #volcanichazards #WashingtonVolcanoPreparednessMonth2014
2mon

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jasonharris2 regram @usgs
Mount Rainier — Nothing better than just a simply beautiful view of Mount Rainier from Reflection Lake. Mount Rainier, the highest peak in the Cascade Range at 4,392m (14,410 ft), forms a dramatic backdrop to the Puget Sound region. During an eruption 5,600 years ago the once-higher edifice ​ ​collapsed to form a large crater open to the northeast much like that at Mount St. Helens after 1980. Ensuing eruptions rebuilt the summit, filling the large collapse crater. Large lahars (volcanic mudflows) from eruptions and from collapses of this massive, heavily glaciated andesitic volcano have reached as far as the Puget Sound lowlands.
Since the last ice age, several dozen explosive eruptions spread​ ​tephra (ash, pumice) across parts of Washington. The last magmatic eruption was about 1,000 years ago. Extensive hydrothermal alteration of the upper portion of the volcano has contributed to its structural weakness promoting collapse. An active thermal system driven by magma deep under the volcano has melted out a labyrinth of steam caves beneath the summit icecap.

Photo Credit: Alan Cressler (alan_cressler on Flickr) ​#USGS #science #volcano #MtRainier #MountRainier #naturalhazards #​landscape
2mon

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2mon usgs
Normal U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
usgs Mount Rainier — Nothing better than just a simply beautiful view of Mount Rainier from Reflection Lake. Mount Rainier, the highest peak in the Cascade Range at 4,392m (14,410 ft), forms a dramatic backdrop to the Puget Sound region. During an eruption 5,600 years ago the once-higher edifice ​ ​collapsed to form a large crater open to the northeast much like that at Mount St. Helens after 1980. Ensuing eruptions rebuilt the summit, filling the large collapse crater. Large lahars (volcanic mudflows) from eruptions and from collapses of this massive, heavily glaciated andesitic volcano have reached as far as the Puget Sound lowlands.
Since the last ice age, several dozen explosive eruptions spread​ ​tephra (ash, pumice) across parts of Washington. The last magmatic eruption was about 1,000 years ago. Extensive hydrothermal alteration of the upper portion of the volcano has contributed to its structural weakness promoting collapse. An active thermal system driven by magma deep under the volcano has melted out a labyrinth of steam caves beneath the summit icecap.

Photo Credit: Alan Cressler (alan_cressler on Flickr) ​#USGS #science #volcano #MtRainier #MountRainier #naturalhazards #​landscape
2mon

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rivalpiper By @pnsn1 "34th Anniversary of Mount St. Helens Eruption - #OnThisDay in 1980, a magnitude 5.1 earthquake occurred at 8:32a.m. PDT and caused a massive landslide on the north side of Mount St. Helens. This landslide released the pressure in the volcano and triggered lateral blasts and followed by a strong, vertically directed eruption. This was the most destructive eruption in the history of the United States. For more information about Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980, please visit the USGS website at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/st_helens/st_helens_geo_hist_99.html

Photo Credit: Robert Krimmel/@usgs

#USGS #WashingtonVolcanoPreparednessMonth2014 #MountStHelens #volcano #historic #eruption #naturalhazards #volcanichazards #blackandwhite #instagood #instadaily" via @PhotoRepost_app
2mon

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pnsn1 34th Anniversary of Mount St. Helens Eruption - #OnThisDay in 1980, a magnitude 5.1 earthquake occurred at 8:32a.m. PDT and caused a massive landslide on the north side of Mount St. Helens. This landslide released the pressure in the volcano and triggered lateral blasts and followed by a strong, vertically directed eruption. This was the most destructive eruption in the history of the United States. For more information about Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980, please visit the USGS website at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/st_helens/st_helens_geo_hist_99.html

Photo Credit: Robert Krimmel/@usgs

#USGS #WashingtonVolcanoPreparednessMonth2014 #MountStHelens #volcano #historic #eruption #naturalhazards #volcanichazards #blackandwhite #instagood #instadaily
2mon
  •   jennbug71 I was 8 years old when it erupted. We lived in boardman and were out on a picnic 2mon

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pnsn1 #TBT: Seattle Post-Intelligencer - 3.27.1980 - Evacuation Plans Made: Mt. St. Helens Eruption "Soon." On March 27, 1980, Mount St. Helens had its first phreatic eruption (i.e., steam-blast eruption) and generated a huge east-trending fracture system on the north side of the summit. The injection of magma produced hundreds of small earthquakes and steam eruptions and led to the formation of the huge north-flank bulge. Please visit the USGS website to learn more about precursor events before Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/st_helens/st_helens_geo_hist_99.html

Photo: UW seismologist Steve Malone was standing in front of seismograms that showed a sudden increase in seismic activities around Mount St Helens, by Robert Degiulio/ #SeattlePostINtelligencer.

#WashingtonVolcanoPreparednessMonth2014 #USGS #universityofwashington #MountStHelens #volcano #naturalhazards #volcanichazards #seattlepi #ThrowBackThursday #instadaily #instacool #instagood
2mon

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Normal Harry Smith
harrys12345 Productive afternoon revising Geography! #geography #naturalhazards #sdme #tropicalstorms #droughts #exams #mindmap 2mon

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pnsn1 #WashingtonVolcanoPreparednessMonth2014: Recent scientific studies confirm Mount St. Helens remains an active volcano. It is a good reminder to everyone in Washington to always be prepared for natural hazards. WAEMD website at www.emd.wa.gov/preparedness/prep_infocus.shtml is a great place to start learning about the preparedness for volcanic hazards in Washington state.
USGS Press Release: www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=3883#.U2qANfk7t8H

Figure: This poster shows the volcanic eruptions in the Cascade range during the past 4,000 years, @usgs.

#USGS #CVO #PNSN #WAEMD #volcanoes #eruptions #CascadeVolcanoes #preparedness #naturalhazards #volcanichazards
3mon

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pnsn1 May is Volcano Awareness and Preparedness Month in Washington state! Washington residents are encouraged to take actions for mitigation activities in this month. Check out USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory website at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/cvo to learn more about the volcanoes and volcanic hazards in Washington state and Washington Emergency Management Division website at www.emd.wa.gov/preparedness/prep_infocus.shtml to find out the preparedness for volcanic activity.

Photo: Seismic station HSR on the south flank of Mount St. Helens and Mount Adams in the background, by Karl Hagel/#PNSN

#USGS #CVO #May #WA #WAEMD #volcanoes #preparedness #MountStHelens #MountAdams #naturalhazards #volcanohazards
3mon

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pnsn1 Mount St. Helens Magma Re-pressurizing: Analysis of current behavior at Mount St. Helens indicates that the volcano remains active and is showing signs of long-term uplift and earthquake activity, but there are no signs of impending eruption. USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) are continuing to monitor ground deformation and seismicity at Mount St. Helens. For more information, please visit the CVO website at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/cvo and see the CVO Information Statement (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-99/MSH%20Information%20Statement%20April%2030%202014.pdf). Photo Credit: Mount St. Helens as viewed from Elk Block by Liz Westby/@usgs.
#USGS#PNSN #UW #CVO #volcanoes #MountStHelens#volcanichazards #naturalhazards
3mon

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3mon usgs
Normal U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
usgs Close Encounters of the Lava Kind—Last week, at Kilauea volcano, the lava flow from the north spatter cone, in Puʻu ʻŌʻō, a new lava flow came close to the north rim of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater, where our webcams are situated. Fortunately, no equipment was damaged, but because of this proximity, several of the webcams and other pieces of equipment were moved to higher ground on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

It's estimated that Kilauea began to form 300,000 to 600,000 years ago and the volcano has been active ever since, with no prolonged periods of quiescence known.

#USGS #science #volcanoes #naturalhazards #Hawaii #Kilauea #lava #landscape #instacool #instagood
3mon

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pnsn1 Bill Steele, our Public Information and Outreach Director, is interviewed by Glenn Farley @king5seattle about last night's M6.6 earthquake on Vancouver Island. Photo: #PNSN.
#earthquake #Cananda #VancouverIsland #naturalhazards #hazards #interview #instadaily
3mon

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4mon usgs
Normal U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
usgs 2014 Washington Landslide — A photo from an aerial survey showing the upper parts of the landslide that occurred in northwest Washington state, near Oso, on March 22, 2014. USGS landslide specialists, in collaboration with seismologists and state agencies, are still working to interpret the complex sequence of events that led to the landslide.
To get a perspective on the size of the landslide look toward the bottom-left of this photo and you see, what appears to be, a tiny house just inside the tree line.
You can read the latest updates on the science and how the USGS is contributing to the understanding of this even at http://on.doi.gov/OsoLandslide. Credit: Jonathan Godt,U.S. Geological Survey.

#USGS #landslide #Oso #Washington #hazards #naturalhazards #science #aerialphoto
4mon
  •   ghendel That's what happens when you clear cut the shit out of everything 4mon
  •   camstewart206 This is close to my hometown and has affected WA state in a major way. Many people have lost their kids, moms, brothers, etc... It's absolutely devastating and not to be made light of with "know it all" comments. That will only show out your ignorance and lack of sympathy for others @ghendel 4mon
  •   dianitadpf Gracias @fnsck muy interesante 4mon
  •   fnsck Yo normalmente no soy así de mala Sangre jahaja @dianitadpf 4mon
  •   deysa780 Guaooooooo @dianitadpf @fnsck 4mon
  •   a_geologist Incredible. I think the bedrock is glacial moraine; not well-consolidated. 4mon
  •   bayarmaa_n @frndospinelli instagram️iss️nasa️usgs 4mon

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