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tropicalro7 Very cool, #Repost @nasagoddard with @repostapp
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It can't always be about space, right? Well, technically this still is about space...and the Super Bowl.

Take a look at how NASA sees all the Super Bowl Championship Cities!

Enjoy the game!
#superbowl #nasagoddard #space
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sprite_jho #Repost @nasagoddard with @repostapp.
・・・
It can't always be about space, right? Well, technically this still is about space...and the Super Bowl.

Take a look at how NASA sees all the Super Bowl Championship Cities!

Enjoy the game!
#superbowl #nasagoddard #space
2d

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photobrucelipsky Happy Super Bowl Sunday. Watch for 2005. Eleven years is like the blink of an eye. #Repost @nasagoddard with @repostapp.
・・・
It can't always be about space, right? Well, technically this still is about space...and the Super Bowl.

Take a look at how NASA sees all the Super Bowl Championship Cities!

Enjoy the game!
#superbowl #nasagoddard #space
2d

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nasagoddard It can't always be about space, right? Well, technically this still is about space...and the Super Bowl.

Take a look at how NASA sees all the Super Bowl Championship Cities!

Enjoy the game!
#superbowl #nasagoddard #space
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vloggin_with_jeff #Repost @nasagoddard with @repostapp
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This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a peculiar galaxy known as NGC 1487, lying about 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Eridanus.

Rather than viewing it as a celestial object, it is actually better to think of this as an event. Here, we are witnessing two or more galaxies in the act of merging together to form a single new galaxy. Each galaxy has lost almost all traces of its original appearance, as stars and gas have been thrown by gravity in an elaborate cosmic whirl.

Unless one is very much bigger than the other, galaxies are always disrupted by the violence of the merging process. As a result, it is very difficult to determine precisely what the original galaxies looked like and, indeed, how many of them there were. In this case, it is possible that we are seeing the merger of several dwarf galaxies that were previously clumped together in a small group.

Although older yellow and red stars can be seen in the outer regions of the new galaxy, its appearance is dominated by large areas of bright blue stars, illuminating the patches of gas that gave them life. This burst of star formation may well have been triggered by the merger.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt #nasagoddard #space #hubble #galaxy
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georgesow 2 galaxies also known as NGC 1487 lying in the region of about 30million light yrs away are merging, ie, galactic merger, to a new galaxy resulting in very massive gravitional cosmic whirl. via #nasa #nasagoddard#2galaxies#merger 3d

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projmgr #Repost @nasagoddard This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a peculiar galaxy known as NGC 1487, lying about 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Eridanus.

Rather than viewing it as a celestial object, it is actually better to think of this as an event. Here, we are witnessing two or more galaxies in the act of merging together to form a single new galaxy. Each galaxy has lost almost all traces of its original appearance, as stars and gas have been thrown by gravity in an elaborate cosmic whirl.

Unless one is very much bigger than the other, galaxies are always disrupted by the violence of the merging process. As a result, it is very difficult to determine precisely what the original galaxies looked like and, indeed, how many of them there were. In this case, it is possible that we are seeing the merger of several dwarf galaxies that were previously clumped together in a small group.

Although older yellow and red stars can be seen in the outer regions of the new galaxy, its appearance is dominated by large areas of bright blue stars, illuminating the patches of gas that gave them life. This burst of star formation may well have been triggered by the merger.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt #nasagoddard #space #hubble #galaxy
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ron_bailey3000 By @nasagoddard "This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a peculiar galaxy known as NGC 1487, lying about 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Eridanus.

Rather than viewing it as a celestial object, it is actually better to think of this as an event. Here, we are witnessing two or more galaxies in the act of merging together to form a single new galaxy. Each galaxy has lost almost all traces of its original appearance, as stars and gas have been thrown by gravity in an elaborate cosmic whirl.

Unless one is very much bigger than the other, galaxies are always disrupted by the violence of the merging process. As a result, it is very difficult to determine precisely what the original galaxies looked like and, indeed, how many of them there were. In this case, it is possible that we are seeing the merger of several dwarf galaxies that were previously clumped together in a small group.

Although older yellow and red stars can be seen in the outer regions of the new galaxy, its appearance is dominated by large areas of bright blue stars, illuminating the patches of gas that gave them life. This burst of star formation may well have been triggered by the merger.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt #nasagoddard #space #hubble #galaxy"
via @PhotoRepost_app
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mbsilb Repost from @nasagoddard - This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a peculiar galaxy known as NGC 1487, lying about 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Eridanus.

Rather than viewing it as a celestial object, it is actually better to think of this as an event. Here, we are witnessing two or more galaxies in the act of merging together to form a single new galaxy. Each galaxy has lost almost all traces of its original appearance, as stars and gas have been thrown by gravity in an elaborate cosmic whirl.

Unless one is very much bigger than the other, galaxies are always disrupted by the violence of the merging process. As a result, it is very difficult to determine precisely what the original galaxies looked like and, indeed, how many of them there were. In this case, it is possible that we are seeing the merger of several dwarf galaxies that were previously clumped together in a small group.

Although older yellow and red stars can be seen in the outer regions of the new galaxy, its appearance is dominated by large areas of bright blue stars, illuminating the patches of gas that gave them life. This burst of star formation may well have been triggered by the merger.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt #nasagoddard #space #hubble #galaxy
4d

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nasagoddard This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a peculiar galaxy known as NGC 1487, lying about 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Eridanus.

Rather than viewing it as a celestial object, it is actually better to think of this as an event. Here, we are witnessing two or more galaxies in the act of merging together to form a single new galaxy. Each galaxy has lost almost all traces of its original appearance, as stars and gas have been thrown by gravity in an elaborate cosmic whirl.

Unless one is very much bigger than the other, galaxies are always disrupted by the violence of the merging process. As a result, it is very difficult to determine precisely what the original galaxies looked like and, indeed, how many of them there were. In this case, it is possible that we are seeing the merger of several dwarf galaxies that were previously clumped together in a small group.

Although older yellow and red stars can be seen in the outer regions of the new galaxy, its appearance is dominated by large areas of bright blue stars, illuminating the patches of gas that gave them life. This burst of star formation may well have been triggered by the merger.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt #nasagoddard #space #hubble #galaxy
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rickshawbags Space Sutro & Dopp Kit 3: The abstract beauty of Earth, viewed from outer space. Inspired by a recent posting by @AtlasObscura featuring satellite photos from @nasagoddard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Image Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7). This one is chunks of sea ice in the frigid waters of Foxe Basin near Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic.

#freshbagsmadedaily #madeinusa #sfmade #madeinsf #madeinsanfransico #rickshawbags #custom #custommade #backpack #dopp #doppkit #EDC #atlasobscura #nasagoddard
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rickshawbags Space Sutro & Dopp Kit 2: The abstract beauty of Earth, viewed from outer space. Inspired by a recent posting by @AtlasObscura featuring satellite photos from @nasagoddard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Image Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 5). This one is two major rivers, the Chaun and Palyavaam, flowing into Russia's Chaunskaya Bay in northeastern Siberia.

#freshbagsmadedaily #madeinusa #sfmade #madeinsf #madeinsanfransico #rickshawbags #custom #custommade #backpack #dopp #doppkit #EDC #atlasobscura #nasagoddard
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rickshawbags Space Sutro & Dopp Kit 1: The abstract beauty of Earth, viewed from outer space. Inspired by a recent posting by @AtlasObscura featuring satellite photos from @nasagoddard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Image Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7). This one is an algae bloom near Gotland, a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea.

#freshbagsmadedaily #madeinusa #sfmade #madeinsf #madeinsanfransico #rickshawbags #custom #custommade #backpack #dopp #doppkit #EDC #atlasobscura #nasagoddard
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Normal TJ
tontoj_11 This thing is huge!
#Repost @nasagoddard with @repostapp
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The 18th and final primary mirror segment is installed on what will be the biggest and most powerful space telescope ever launched. The final mirror installation Wednesday at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland marks an important milestone in the assembly of the agency’s James Webb Space Telescope. “Scientists and engineers have been working tirelessly to install these incredible, nearly perfect mirrors that will focus light from previously hidden realms of planetary atmospheres, star forming regions and the very beginnings of the Universe,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “With the mirrors finally complete, we are one step closer to the audacious observations that will unravel the mysteries of the Universe.” Using a robotic arm reminiscent of a claw machine, the team meticulously installed all of Webb's primary mirror segments onto the telescope structure. Each of the hexagonal-shaped mirror segments measures just over 4.2 feet (1.3 meters) across -- about the size of a coffee table -- and weighs approximately 88 pounds (40 kilograms). Once in space and fully deployed, the 18 primary mirror segments will work together as one large 21.3-foot diameter (6.5-meter) mirror.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn #nasagoddard #jwst #space #amazeballs
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krek30 #Repost @nasagoddard with @repostapp
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The 18th and final primary mirror segment is installed on what will be the biggest and most powerful space telescope ever launched. The final mirror installation Wednesday at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland marks an important milestone in the assembly of the agency’s James Webb Space Telescope. “Scientists and engineers have been working tirelessly to install these incredible, nearly perfect mirrors that will focus light from previously hidden realms of planetary atmospheres, star forming regions and the very beginnings of the Universe,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “With the mirrors finally complete, we are one step closer to the audacious observations that will unravel the mysteries of the Universe.” Using a robotic arm reminiscent of a claw machine, the team meticulously installed all of Webb's primary mirror segments onto the telescope structure. Each of the hexagonal-shaped mirror segments measures just over 4.2 feet (1.3 meters) across -- about the size of a coffee table -- and weighs approximately 88 pounds (40 kilograms). Once in space and fully deployed, the 18 primary mirror segments will work together as one large 21.3-foot diameter (6.5-meter) mirror.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn #nasagoddard #jwst #space #amazeballs
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Normal jojie
sprite_jho #Repost @nasagoddard with @repostapp.
・・・
The 18th and final primary mirror segment is installed on what will be the biggest and most powerful space telescope ever launched. The final mirror installation Wednesday at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland marks an important milestone in the assembly of the agency’s James Webb Space Telescope. “Scientists and engineers have been working tirelessly to install these incredible, nearly perfect mirrors that will focus light from previously hidden realms of planetary atmospheres, star forming regions and the very beginnings of the Universe,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “With the mirrors finally complete, we are one step closer to the audacious observations that will unravel the mysteries of the Universe.” Using a robotic arm reminiscent of a claw machine, the team meticulously installed all of Webb's primary mirror segments onto the telescope structure. Each of the hexagonal-shaped mirror segments measures just over 4.2 feet (1.3 meters) across -- about the size of a coffee table -- and weighs approximately 88 pounds (40 kilograms). Once in space and fully deployed, the 18 primary mirror segments will work together as one large 21.3-foot diameter (6.5-meter) mirror.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn #nasagoddard #jwst #space #amazeballs
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nasagoddard The 18th and final primary mirror segment is installed on what will be the biggest and most powerful space telescope ever launched. The final mirror installation Wednesday at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland marks an important milestone in the assembly of the agency’s James Webb Space Telescope. “Scientists and engineers have been working tirelessly to install these incredible, nearly perfect mirrors that will focus light from previously hidden realms of planetary atmospheres, star forming regions and the very beginnings of the Universe,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “With the mirrors finally complete, we are one step closer to the audacious observations that will unravel the mysteries of the Universe.” Using a robotic arm reminiscent of a claw machine, the team meticulously installed all of Webb's primary mirror segments onto the telescope structure. Each of the hexagonal-shaped mirror segments measures just over 4.2 feet (1.3 meters) across -- about the size of a coffee table -- and weighs approximately 88 pounds (40 kilograms). Once in space and fully deployed, the 18 primary mirror segments will work together as one large 21.3-foot diameter (6.5-meter) mirror.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn #nasagoddard #jwst #space #amazeballs
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