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jeannebrooks PSA y'all! From @nasagoddard --- How, When and Where to Safely Watch the Oct. 23 Partial Solar Eclipse
During the late afternoon of Oct. 23, 2014, a partial solar eclipse will be visible from much of North America before sundown. Partial eclipses occur when the moon blocks part of the sun from view.

It is never safe to look at the sun with the naked eye. Even during a partial eclipse, when only a very small part of the sun is visible, viewing it without eye protection risks permanent eye damage or blindness. Listed below are a few ways of safely watching the eclipse. No matter which recommended technique you choose, do not stare continuously at the sun. Take breaks and give your eyes a rest. And, remember, don't use regular sunglasses -- they don't offer your eyes sufficient protection.

The safest and most inexpensive way to watch a partial solar eclipse is by projection. Place a pinhole or small opening in a card, and hold it between the sun and a screen – giant sheet of white paper works – a few feet away. An image of the sun will be seen on the screen. Projected images of the sun's crescent during an eclipse may even be seen on the ground in the small openings created by interlacing fingers, or in the dappled sunlight beneath a leafy tree. You can also use binoculars to project a magnified image of the sun on a white card. However, you must never look through the binoculars at the sun.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1tICSHS

Credit: T. Ruen #nasagoddard #solareclipse #sun #sky
16h

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nasagoddard How, When and Where to Safely Watch the Oct. 23 Partial Solar Eclipse
During the late afternoon of Oct. 23, 2014, a partial solar eclipse will be visible from much of North America before sundown. Partial eclipses occur when the moon blocks part of the sun from view.

It is never safe to look at the sun with the naked eye. Even during a partial eclipse, when only a very small part of the sun is visible, viewing it without eye protection risks permanent eye damage or blindness. Listed below are a few ways of safely watching the eclipse. No matter which recommended technique you choose, do not stare continuously at the sun. Take breaks and give your eyes a rest. And, remember, don't use regular sunglasses -- they don't offer your eyes sufficient protection.

The safest and most inexpensive way to watch a partial solar eclipse is by projection. Place a pinhole or small opening in a card, and hold it between the sun and a screen – giant sheet of white paper works – a few feet away. An image of the sun will be seen on the screen. Projected images of the sun's crescent during an eclipse may even be seen on the ground in the small openings created by interlacing fingers, or in the dappled sunlight beneath a leafy tree. You can also use binoculars to project a magnified image of the sun on a white card. However, you must never look through the binoculars at the sun.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1tICSHS

Credit: T. Ruen #nasagoddard #solareclipse #sun #sky
18h

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serjserjv Wooow. By @nasagoddard "Comet Siding Spring Mars Flyby

On October 19, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 88,000 miles of Mars – just one third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon! Traveling at 33 miles per second and weighing as much as a small mountain, the comet hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, originating in a region of icy debris known as the Oort cloud. Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere. NASA will be watching closely before, during, and after the flyby with its entire fleet of Mars orbiters and rovers, along with the Hubble Space Telescope and dozens of instruments on Earth. The encounter is certain to teach us more about Oort cloud comets, the Martian atmosphere, and the solar system’s earliest ingredients.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center #nasagoddard #MarsComet #mars" via @PhotoRepost_app
2d

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hatshepsit Comet Siding Spring Mars Flyby

On October 19, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 88,000 miles of Mars – just one third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon! Traveling at 33 miles per second and weighing as much as a small mountain, the comet hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, originating in a region of icy debris known as the Oort cloud. Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere. NASA will be watching closely before, during, and after the flyby with its entire fleet of Mars orbiters and rovers, along with the Hubble Space Telescope and dozens of instruments on Earth. The encounter is certain to teach us more about Oort cloud comets, the Martian atmosphere, and the solar system’s earliest ingredients.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center #nasagoddard #MarsComet #mars
3d

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nasagoddard Comet Siding Spring Mars Flyby

On October 19, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 88,000 miles of Mars – just one third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon! Traveling at 33 miles per second and weighing as much as a small mountain, the comet hails from the outer fringes of our solar system, originating in a region of icy debris known as the Oort cloud. Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere. NASA will be watching closely before, during, and after the flyby with its entire fleet of Mars orbiters and rovers, along with the Hubble Space Telescope and dozens of instruments on Earth. The encounter is certain to teach us more about Oort cloud comets, the Martian atmosphere, and the solar system’s earliest ingredients.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center #nasagoddard #MarsComet #mars
3d

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Normal capellauzay
capellauzay #Repost from @nasagoddard with @repostapp --- Hubble's View of Comet Siding Spring

Comet Siding Spring is plunging toward the Sun along a roughly 1-million-year orbit. The comet, discovered in 2013, was within the radius of Jupiter's orbit when the Hubble Space Telescope photographed it on March 11, 2014. Hubble resolves two jets of dust coming from the solid icy nucleus. These persistent jets were first seen in Hubble pictures taken on Oct. 29, 2013. The feature should allow astronomers to measure the direction of the nucleus's pole, and hence, rotation axis. The comet will make its closest approach to our Sun on Oct. 25, 2014, at a distance of 130 million miles, well outside Earth's orbit. On its inbound leg, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 84,000 miles of Mars on Oct. 19, 2014, which is less than half the Moon's distance from Earth. The comet is not expected to become bright enough to be seen by the naked eye.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and J.-Y. Li (Planetary Science Institute) #nasagoddard #MarsComet #capellauzay #capellauzaytoplulugu #akdenizuniversity #akdenizuniversitesi #space #sidingspring
3d

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nasagoddard Hubble's View of Comet Siding Spring

Comet Siding Spring is plunging toward the Sun along a roughly 1-million-year orbit. The comet, discovered in 2013, was within the radius of Jupiter's orbit when the Hubble Space Telescope photographed it on March 11, 2014. Hubble resolves two jets of dust coming from the solid icy nucleus. These persistent jets were first seen in Hubble pictures taken on Oct. 29, 2013. The feature should allow astronomers to measure the direction of the nucleus's pole, and hence, rotation axis. The comet will make its closest approach to our Sun on Oct. 25, 2014, at a distance of 130 million miles, well outside Earth's orbit. On its inbound leg, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 84,000 miles of Mars on Oct. 19, 2014, which is less than half the Moon's distance from Earth. The comet is not expected to become bright enough to be seen by the naked eye.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and J.-Y. Li (Planetary Science Institute) #nasagoddard #MarsComet
5d

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rachela_adler The Heliophysics Science Division conducts research on the Sun, its extended solar-system environment (the heliosphere), and interactions of Earth, other planets, small bodies, and interstellar gas with the heliosphere. Division research also encompasses geospace -- Earth's uppermost atmosphere, the ionosphere, and the magnetosphere -- and the changing environmental conditions throughout the coupled heliosphere (solar system weather). 5d

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rachela_adler #MagRecon dr. Thomas E. Moore talking about #MMS and reconnection #NASAGoddard #NASA #Heliophysics 5d

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jromoe Where's my rocketship? 5d

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Normal Ron Bailey
ron_bailey3000 By @nasagoddard "Hurricane Watch in Effect for Bermuda

Hurricane Gonzalo is moving toward the northwest near 12 mph. A turn toward the north-northwest and then north is expected during the next day or so, followed by a north northeastward acceleration by late Thursday. Maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph making Gonzalo a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Tropical storm conditions are possible on Bermuda by late Thursday night, with hurricane conditions possible on Friday. Large swells generated by Gonzalo will reach much of the U.S. east coast and Bermuda on Thursday. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. This image was taken by GOES 13 at 1607 UTC on October 16, 2014.

Caption: NOAA Image Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #Hurricane #Gonzalo #Bermuda #weather" via @PhotoRepost_app
6d

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nasagoddard Hurricane Watch in Effect for Bermuda

Hurricane Gonzalo is moving toward the northwest near 12 mph. A turn toward the north-northwest and then north is expected during the next day or so, followed by a north northeastward acceleration by late Thursday. Maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph making Gonzalo a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Tropical storm conditions are possible on Bermuda by late Thursday night, with hurricane conditions possible on Friday. Large swells generated by Gonzalo will reach much of the U.S. east coast and Bermuda on Thursday. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. This image was taken by GOES 13 at 1607 UTC on October 16, 2014.

Caption: NOAA Image Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #Hurricane #Gonzalo #Bermuda #weather
6d

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nasagoddard The Turbulent Bering Sea

Large blooms of phytoplankton (likely coccolithophores) surrounded the 51-kilometer-long St. Matthew Island in the Bering Sea on October 8, 2014 when the above Aqua-MODIS image was collected. The swirls and eddies of color give some indication of the turbulent nature of these waters. The reflective blooms have been visible from orbit for a few months now.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Aqua/MODIS #nasagoddard
7d
  •   skywokernn Один, два, три! Просто русский комментарий, не обращайте внимание! 6d
  •   nasa_leaked For NASA's leaked stuff checkout my account. All about UFOs & NASA's unexplained files. 6d
  •   a.kupto @skywokernn красава! 6d
  •   manicole59 Jollllliiiieeeeeeeee 6d
  •   skywokernn Спасибо! @a.kupto 6d
  •   mifavo I've never seen something like this.. and you've never seen these awesome quotes in my gllry.. #f4m 6d
  •   gaurravv5 Awesome view 6d

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sailorpi Oh yeah! I remember what autumn in the Northeast is like #maryland #nasagoddard 7d

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she79col By @nasagoddard "Boo!

Active regions on the sun combined to look something like a jack-o-lantern’s face on Oct. 8, 2014. The active regions appear brighter because those are areas that emit more light and energy — markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona. This image blends together two sets of wavelengths at 171 and 193 Angstroms, typically colorized in gold and yellow, to create a particularly Halloween-like appearance.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO #nasagoddard #boo #halloween #sun" via @PhotoRepost_app
1w

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nasagoddard There’s more than one way to study the impact of biofuels. For NASA scientists, it means trailing an aircraft from as little as 300 feet behind while flying 34,000 feet in the air.

Earlier this year, a NASA-led team conducted a series of carefully choreographed flights over California in order to sniff out how aircraft emissions differ when using petroleum fuels or biofuels. Early results from the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS II) experiment confirm that blended biofuel is the cleaner-burning fuel.
"Our findings show we definitely see a 50 percent reduction in soot emissions from the DC-8 when it burns the blended fuel as opposed to jet fuel alone," said Bruce Anderson, ACCESS principal investigator from NASA's Langley Research Center.

The DC-8 is a NASA science workhorse: a flying laboratory equipped to collect—or, in this case, produce—data for basic Earth science research. During the ACESS experiment, scientists took advantage of the aircraft's segregated fuel tank. On the fly, the pilot switched the fuel type sent to each of the four engines. The engines burned either jet fuel, or a 50-50 blend of jet fuel and a renewable alternative produced from camelina plant oil. With each change of fuel, three other instrumented aircraft took turns lining up in the DC-8's wake and flying anywhere from 90 meters (300 feet) to more than 30 kilometers (20 miles) behind to catch a sniff.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1wBfaKq

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory #nasagoddard
1w

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