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galgalactic_space Image from the MAHLI acquired on Sol 171 of Curiosity's mission to Gale Crater.
Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS. No filters! And no "false" color ))) This is mars in color!! and "Mahli" is - The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) will acquire color close-up images of rocks and surface materials at the MSL landing site at a range of spatial scales with resolution as high as 13.9 micrometers per pixel.
1y

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galgalactic_space A cradle of stars.... >> Six hundred newly forming stars are crowded into intricate filaments of gas and dust that makes up this stellar nursery, seen for the first time by ESA’s Herschel space observatory.

The nebulous area coloured in blue, known as W40 or Sharpless 2-64, is roughly 1000 light-years away in the constellation Aquila, and is about 25 light-years across.

It is a vast cloud of hydrogen gas, illuminated by the radiation streaming out from at least three young massive stars embedded in the cloud.

The nebula is expanding into the surrounding medium, compressing the ambient gas on its way and triggering the formation of a second generation of even younger stars.
2y

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galgalactic_space The flame on the left and the horse head on the right! The Flame Nebula sits on the eastern hip of Orion the Hunter, a constellation most easily visible in the northern hemisphere during winter evenings. This view of the nebula was taken by WISE, NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer.

This image shows a vast cloud of gas and dust where new stars are being born. Three familiar nebulae are visible in the central region: the Flame Nebula, the Horsehead Nebula and NGC 2023. The Flame Nebula is the brightest and largest in the image. It is lit by a star inside it that is 20 times the mass of the sun and would be as bright to our eyes as the other stars in Orion's belt if it weren't for all the surrounding dust, which makes it appear 4 billion times dimmer than it actually is.
2y

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galgalactic_space Blazing Black Holes Spotted in Spiral Beauty

This new view of spiral galaxy IC 342, also known as Caldwell 5, includes data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. High-energy X-ray data from NuSTAR have been translated to the color magenta, and superimposed on a visible-light view highlighting the galaxy and its star-studded arms. NuSTAR is the first orbiting telescope to take focused pictures of the cosmos in high-energy X-ray light; previous observations of this same galaxy taken at similar wavelengths blurred the entire object into one pixel. The two magenta spots are blazing black holes first detected at lower-energy X-ray wavelengths by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. With NuSTAR's complementary data, astronomers can start to home in on the black holes' mysterious properties. The black holes appear much brighter than typical stellar-mass black holes, such as those that pepper our own galaxy, yet they cannot be supermassive black holes or they would have sunk to the galaxy’s center. Instead, they may be intermediate in mass, or there may be something else going on to explain their extremely energetic state. NuSTAR will help solve this puzzle. IC 342 lies 7 million light-years away in the Camelopardalis constellation. The outer edges of the galaxy cannot be seen in this view. This image shows NuSTAR X-ray data taken at 10 to 35 kiloelectron volts. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky Survey. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/DSS Mission: NuSTAR
2y

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