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taraross1787 On this day in 1775, Congress rejects a plan of reconciliation that had been offered by the British. But did Lord North, the British Prime Minister, doom his own plan from the beginning? North convinced Parliament to approve the offer. But North offered to reconcile with each of the colonies, individually. No offer was made to the Continental Congress or to the colonies, as a whole. Was he really trying to reconcile? Or did he hope to prompt disunion and discord among the colonies? If he was hoping to prompt bickering among the colonies, he failed. One resolution from #Virginia stated: “We consider ourselves as bound in Honor as well as Interest to share one general Fate with our Sister Colonies, and should hold ourselves base Deserters of that Union, to which we have acceded, were we to agree on any Measures distinct and apart from them.” Some colonies forwarded the proposal to the Continental Congress, but Congress was unimpressed. Lord North thought that the colonies could tax themselves for some purposes (provided that they raised enough revenue), but Britain would retain authority to tax for certain regulatory purposes. When Congress acted on July 31, it rejected North’s proposal, calling it “unreasonable and insidious.” But perhaps Benjamin Franklin described the proposal best. He wrote: “I cannot conceive that any Colony will undertake to grant a Revenue, to a Government that holds a Sword over their Heads, with a Threat to strike the moment they cease to give or do not give so much as it is pleas’d to expect. In such a Situation, where is the Right of giving our own Property freely? or the Right to judge of our own Ability to give? It seems to me the Language of a Highwayman, who with a Pistol in your Face says, Give me your Purse, and then I will not put my Hand into your Pocket. But give me all your Money or I’ll shoot you thro’ the Head.” Americans were NOT going to submit to that Highwayman! FULL STORY: facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787 #TDIH #AmericanHistory #USHistory #freedom #liberty #1776 #TBT #throwbackthursday #HS #HSMommas #homeschool #DontTreadOnMe 5h

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joyfulsocks Homeschool Mom. Like regular moms, except able to whoop her teenagers at any game! Woot-Woot. #homeschool #hsmommas #metroartpuzzle 22h

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taraross1787 On this day in 1781, Loyalists win the Battle of the House in the Horseshoe. Yes! The battle really occurred in a house. That house belonged to #NorthCarolina Patriot Philip Alston, and it was situated near a horseshoe at the bend of a river. Alston had been trying to capture Loyalist commander David Fanning but had so far been unsuccessful. Little did he know that Fanning was about to turn the tables. On July 29, Fanning surprised and captured some of Alston’s sentries. The rest of Alston’s men barricaded themselves inside the house. Alston’s wife and children were there. His wife, Temperance, hid their children in the chimney, propping them up on a table so they would be protected from gunfire. (Wow! How terrifying to be a child trapped in a chimney while a battle is going on outside!) Fanning tried a few tricks to rush the house or to burn it down. Each attempt failed. But then someone had an idea. They took a cart, filled it with hay, and set it afire. They intended to roll the cart toward the house, perhaps finally burning it down. Alston knew that he had to surrender to save his family. But it also seemed obvious that Fanning would kill him upon sight. Temperance decided to go out under a white flag to meet with Fanning herself. She must have been one tough lady! Reportedly, she told him: “We will surrender, sir, on condition that no one shall be injured; otherwise we will make the best defense we can; and if need be, sell our lives as dearly as possible.” Alston and his men were taken prisoner, but they were allowed parole. In the grand scheme of things, the battle was a relatively small skirmish. But it reflects a fact that is easy to forget today: The #AmericanRevolution was a war that was fought very close to home. Our ancestors literally put everything on the line so they could obtain freedom. MORE: Facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787 #TDIH #AmericanHistory #liberty #freedom #tcot #ComeAndTakeIt #LibertyOrDeath #HS #HSMommas #homeschool 2d
  •   gunsbeerbacon My ancestor was Samuel Alston who was in the Militia and also in the provincial congress in 1775. Probably related, i gotta find out! 2d
  •   gunsbeerbacon Correction: Solomon Alston, 1708-85. Colonel of NC Militia 1775, Provincial Congress 1776 2d
  •   taraross1787 @gunsbeerbacon that's awesome that you can trace your ancestors back that far! 2d

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taraross1787 On this day in 1779, Fort Freeland falls to British and Indian forces after a show of “stout resistance”! A group of settlers had gathered at the fort on the #Pennsylvania frontier, seeking protection from local Indian tribes, which had allied with the British. Only 21 Continental soldiers were present to protect the fort when several hundred British and Indians attacked. Americans didn’t have much ammunition, but did what they could. Women melted down anything they could find to make bullets. The resistance caused the British captain to offer terms of surrender before reinforcements could arrive. All women and children were granted safe passage. Men became prisoners of war. Soon, the deal was done. The British and Indians pillaged and burnt the fort. They killed some of their new prisoners of war. Americans at nearby Fort Boone did not know about the deal. They heard the sound of fighting and decided to help. One of the raid participants later stated that they “knew not the number of the [British] invaders, and cared not.” He recounted that Captain Hawkins Boone led “[t]hirty-two stanch men” toward the scene. When they arrived, they discovered the British celebrating. Boone launched a surprise attack! Apparently, one American, Captain Doughtery, became “inflamed” when he saw an Indian holding the fort’s flag. The Indian chief’s wife later recounted that he shot the Indian, then kept shooting any Indian who attempted to pick up the flag. The Indian chief, “exasperated at the sight of such bravery, sallied out . . . killed Capts. Doughtery, Boon, and fourteen men, at the first fire.” Americans were badly outnumbered. They could not have hoped to win—and they didn’t. The stories of our Revolution aren’t all stories of victories, obviously. But they are often stories of bravery—as this one is. *Logistical note* Dates and numbers are hard to quantify in this story. More info at Facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787. The picture is of a war monument in #NewJersey. Jacob Freeland, upon whose property Fort Freeland was built, is listed on the monument. #TDIH #AmericanHistory #liberty #freedom #HS #HSMommas #homeschool #ComeAndTakeIt #DontTreadOnMe #LibertyOrDeath #MCM 3d

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adventuresinchildrearing Excited to dig into my new homeschool curriculum from WritingWithSharonWatson.com #homeschool #curriculum #hsmommas #hsbloggers 5d
  •   gricefullyhsing My daughter did "Jump In" several years ago between 8th & 9th grade. She still remembers some of what she learned. 5d

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taraross1787 A little presidential trivia for your Saturday? Do you know which of our Presidents was sworn in by his father? Answer: Calvin Coolidge! He was vacationing on his family farm in Vermont when he received news that Warren Harding had passed away. Coolidge's father was a notary public and was able to administer the oath. Coolidge himself later described the scene: “On the night of August 2, 1923, I was awakened by my father coming up the stairs, calling my name. I noticed that his voice trembled. As the only times I had ever observed that before were when death had visited our family, I knew that something of the gravest nature had occurred. He placed in my hands an official report and told me that President Harding had just passed away. My wife and I at once dressed. Before leaving the room I knelt down and, with the same prayer with which I have since approached the altar of the church, asked God to bless the American people and give me power to serve them. . . . [T]he oath was administered by my father in his capacity as a notary public, an office he had held for a great many years. The oath was taken in what we always called the sitting room, by the light of the kerosene lamp, which was the most modern form of lighting that had then reached the neighborhood. The Bible which had belonged to my mother lay on the table at my hand. It was not officially used, as it is not the practice in Vermont or Massachusetts to use a Bible in connection with the administration of an oath. Besides my father and myself, there were present my wife, Senator Dale, who happened to be stopping a few miles away, my stenographer, and my chauffeur.” More presidential trivia is available every Saturday at Facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787 #history #USHistory #CalvinCoolidge #Vermont #Bible #faith #God #presidentialtrivia #USPresidents #notarypublic #freedom #liberty #USA #HS #HSMommas #homeschool 5d

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joyfulsocks Quiet breakfast & French dark roasted coffee before convention. Manning the #hsmwsummit booth today. Getting #hsmommas excited & educated about Winter Sumit 2015. Come see me & get a FREE HUG! #thsc2014 6d
  •   waynzgirl Ahhhh, we like the same kind of coffee. Mmmmm. 21h

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taraross1787 Guys, I had this one ready to go until I realized that today is July 24, not July 23. Oops. So…..YESTERDAY on this day in history (7-23-1793), Roger Sherman passed away. He was the only person to sign all four Revolutionary-era state documents: the Articles of Association of 1774, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the U.S. Constitution. At the Constitutional Convention, Sherman generally worried about giving large states too much power over the small states. He wasn't the only one! Indeed, this issue nearly tore the Convention apart. Just when it seemed that the Convention might have to dissolve, a compromise was reached. Sherman was influential in crafting this "Great Compromise," which led to the creation of a Senate (one state, one vote) and a House (one person, one vote) in the new Congress. Sherman also opposed the idea of a direct national election for President. He believed that such a system would give the large states a permanent advantage over the small states. Notably, the Electoral College, when it was created, reflected the compromises that had already been made in the composition of Congress. Sherman was well-respected by many of his peers. Thomas Jefferson said of him: "That is Mr. Sherman, of Connecticut, a man who never said a foolish thing in his life." Of course, that leads one to wonder: What would Sherman say if he could see what is going on these days?! #TDIH #USHistory #AmericanHistory #USConstitution #freedom #liberty #tcot #ElectoralCollege #USConstitution #1787 #1776 #HS #HSMommas #homeschool #TBT #throwbackthursday 1w

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taraross1787 On this day in 1746, a future Spanish Governor and supporter of the Patriot cause is born. You probably don’t know his name, but you’ve surely heard of a city named in his honor: #Galveston, Texas! Or maybe you’ve traveled down Galvez Street in #NewOrleans? Gen. Bernardo de Gálvez has been described as one of those historical figures “whose contributions are barely noticed in classroom histories, but without whom, events would have turned out dramatically differently.” Gálvez was Governor of #Louisiana at about the time that America was declaring its independence. This worked out well for us! Gálvez helped Americans, even though Spain had not formally entered the war against England. He secured New Orleans so that British supplies could not be sent up the #Mississippi—and he looked the other way when the Patriots smuggled supplies through themselves. When Spain declared war against Britain in 1779, Gálvez seized the opportunity to help in a more proactive fashion. He mobilized a force of 1,400 men and embarked on a campaign against British forts in the area. Would you believe that a hurricane chose that moment to strike, sinking the boats that he and his men were supposed to use? Not to be hindered, Gálvez’s force instead marched more than 100 miles on foot. Despite its rough beginning, this campaign and two subsequent ones were wildly successful. Multiple British forts and naval vessels were captured. Later, #Mobile and #Pensacola were both secured for Spain. Gálvez’s efforts were vitally important to the American war effort. If nothing else, they distracted the British and forced them to maintain another theater of war to the south. P.S. The picture shows the capture of Pensacola in 1781. MORE: facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787 #TDIH #AmericanHistory #USHistory #history #liberty #freedom #tcot #conservative #AmericanRevolution #1776 #1787 #HS #HSMommas #homeschool #humblebrag 1w
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taraross1787 On this day in 1893, a professor stands atop Pikes Peak. She is struck by the beauty around her and is inspired to write a poem. Today, we all know that poem as a song: “America the Beautiful.” It nearly became our national anthem! The professor was Katharine Lee Bates. She was teaching at Colorado College during the summer of 1893. Her train ride to the West made a deep impression on her. Once in Colorado, she had the opportunity to visit Pikes Peak, along with some of the other teachers. She was overcome by all that she saw. She later wrote: “It was then and there, as I was looking out over the sea-like expanse of fertile country spreading away so far under those ample skies, that the opening lines of the hymn floated into my mind.” According to the Pikes Peak website, she later told friends that “countries such as England had failed because, while they may have been ‘great.’ they had not been ‘good’ and that ‘unless we are willing to crown our greatness with goodness, and our bounty with brotherhood, our beloved America may go the same way.’” Bates’s poem was published on July 4, 1895, but it was later revised a bit when people started setting the poem to music. “When I found that you really wanted to sing it,” Bates remarked, “I rewrote it in some respects to make it a bit more musical.” The poem was sung to many different tunes for years until, finally, a melody by Samuel Ward stuck. Interestingly, Bates and Ward never met each other. And neither of them really made any money on the song. Bates did not seek royalties. Instead, the result of their accidental partnership has been a great gift to the country. MORE: facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787 #TDIH #AmericanHistory #USHistory #America #freedom #liberty #GodBlessTheUSA #God #faith #religion #tcot #conservative #HS #homeschool #HSMommas #PikesPeak #Colorado 1w

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hannahdecesare1776 #Repost from @taraross1787 with @repostapp --- On this day in 1789, Benjamin Rush writes a letter to John Adams. The letter sounds harsh to modern ears. And yet it makes perfect sense. Our Founders were not trying to create a pure democracy, in which simple majorities always rule! Many of you have heard the analogy: A democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner. (Yikes!) Our Founders knew this dynamic, too. PURE democracies tend to implode. Too often, bare majorities will tyrannize over large minority groups when they are given the chance. So, yes, the Founders created a self-governing nation, but our Constitution also contains other checks and balances on power. These safeguards protect our freedom. Both Rush and Adams would have understood that. #TDIH #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #libertarian #conservative #tcot #1776 #1787 #DontTreadOnMe #democracy #republic #USConstitution #HS #homeschool #HSMommas 1w

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taraross1787 On this day in 1789, Benjamin Rush writes a letter to John Adams. The letter sounds harsh to modern ears. And yet it makes perfect sense. Our Founders were not trying to create a pure democracy, in which simple majorities always rule! Many of you have heard the analogy: A democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner. (Yikes!) Our Founders knew this dynamic, too. PURE democracies tend to implode. Too often, bare majorities will tyrannize over large minority groups when they are given the chance. So, yes, the Founders created a self-governing nation, but our Constitution also contains other checks and balances on power. These safeguards protect our freedom. Both Rush and Adams would have understood that. #TDIH #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #libertarian #conservative #tcot #1776 #1787 #DontTreadOnMe #democracy #republic #USConstitution #HS #homeschool #HSMommas 1w
  •   zbob32 Awesome post! I love reading these historical accounts that you share with us daily. Validating what i find to be simple truths of American philosophy with quotes such as this is like a breath of fresh air. Thank you. *I hope that I worded that correctly. 1w
  •   taraross1787 @zbob32 thank you! What a nice compliment. So glad you are enjoying them. 1w

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taraross1787 On this day in 1775, American Patriots set fire to Boston Light, then the oldest lighthouse in North America. The British were under siege in Boston throughout the summer of 1775, but many skirmishes still occurred between the two sides. One involved the lighthouse. The Patriots wanted to cripple it, undermining British activities in Boston Harbor. On July 20, Maj. Joseph Vose led a raid on Little Brewster Island, where the lighthouse was located. These Americans landed “in open day and in fair sight of several men of War,” as Abigail Adams later told John Adams. They took whatever they could find—gunpowder, rope, oil—then set fire to the lighthouse. One eyewitness said that he saw “flames of the lighthouse ascending up to Heaven, like grateful incense.” Well, with such a fire, you can imagine that the British soon took off after the American raiding party! The Patriots were pursued by “Eight Barges, one cutter, [and] one Schooner, all in Battle array,” according to Abigail. In good news, Americans escaped with only two injuries. In bad news, they left behind a lighthouse that had not been completely destroyed. The British made quick repairs. On July 31, Americans went back. This time, several hundred men participated and did a much better job of destroying the lighthouse. Why do these small skirmishes matter? Perhaps Abigail Adams summarized it best: “These little Skirmishes seem trifling, but they serve to innure our Men and harden them to Danger,” she wrote to John Adams. And we now know that our ancestors (unfortunately) really need to be hardened to danger, didn’t they? The war would continue for many more years before the British finally surrendered at Yorktown. FULL STORY: facebook.com/TaraRoss.1787 #USHistory #TDIH #AmericanHistory #Boston #lighthouses #AbigailAdams #JohnAdams #liberty #freedom #HS #HSMommas #homeschool #conservative #libertarian 2w
  •   skeletorium this account had taught me more than public school has when it comes to US history. thank you. 2w
  •   taraross1787 Thanks @gabes.pix I try to do one of these a day and hope they help. I wish I'd learned it when I was growing up, too! Learned most of it later. :) 2w

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taraross1787 On this day in 1781, Americans fight the Battle of Quinby Bridge and Shubrick’s Plantation. One historian describes it as “not a big engagement”; however, it “typifies the slow, inexorable military pressure that gradually drove the British into an ever-decreasing perimeter around the port city [Charleston]” at the end of the war. Brig. Gen. Thomas Sumter had overall command of a special force in the area. He was working with Brig. Gen. Francis Marion and Lt. Col. Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee. On the other side was Loyalist Lt. Col. James Coates. He learned that Sumter was coming and retreated to a nearby church, bringing British supplies inside its fortified walls. He abandoned this position late on July 16, setting fire to the church and supplies. The fire caught Sumter's attention at 3 a.m. on July 17. He ordered an immediate pursuit. Lee soon caught up to Coates’s rear guard, which gave up without a fight. In the meantime, Coates was at Quinby Bridge, loosening the planks. He planned to finish disabling the bridge when his rear guard crossed. He must have been surprised to see Americans coming instead! Lee’s cavalry were soon charging the bridge. The British had a howitzer, but Americans rushed the gun before it could be fired. The first round of cavalry dislodged some of the already-loosened planks on the bridge; more cavalry continued across anyway. The British began running toward nearby Shubrick’s Plantation, which had many buildings that could act as defenses. The gaps in the bridge had been widening from the two cavalry charges, delaying the Patriot forces. When Lee and Marion finally reached the other side, they decided to await Sumter and his artillery before attacking the plantation. Imagine their frustration when they learned that Sumter had left the artillery behind! Sumter ordered an attack despite the American disadvantage. Lives were unnecessarily lost before a retreat was ordered. Many soldiers refused to fight for Sumter again. P.S. The photo is of Light Horse Harry Lee. FULL STORY: http://on.fb.me/1t9ol3K #TDIH #AmericanHistory #liberty #freedom #tcot #TBT #Charleston #ThrowbackThursday #HS #homeschool #HSMommas #ComeAndTakeIt 2w

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littlewraplady Would you? I've just got to know!! Get PAID to have fun! Email me to find out more info! Fabulouswraps@gmail.com #job #sahm #wahm #hs #hsmommas #hsbloggers #fitspo #fitfam #instacool #imwraprich #littlewraplady #instafitness #selfie #eastnashville #nashville 2w

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taraross1787 On this day in 1776, George Washington refuses to accept a letter from British Admiral Richard Howe. The British were attempting to contact Washington without using his military title. Of course, what they REALLY meant is that they did not accept the legitimacy of the American cause! Washington’s army was then on Long Island and in Manhattan, preparing to defend NYC from a British attack. Then a surprising thing happened. On July 14, a British lieutenant came across the harbor under a flag of truce. He told Joseph Reed (one of Washington’s most trusted officers) that he had a letter for “Mr. Washington.” Reed responded that “we have no person in our army with that address.” The lieutenant asked by what title Washington should be addressed. “You are sensible, sir,” Reed responded, “of the rank of General Washington in our army.” The lieutenant was soon sent on his way. Three days later, the episode was repeated. This time, the letter was addressed to “George Washington, Esq., etc., etc.” Again, the British officer was refused. The next day, a different officer came over and asked if “General Washington” would accept a visit from an adjutant general to General William Howe. The offer was accepted. Colonel James Paterson met Washington at his headquarters on July 20. Can you believe that Paterson threw the SAME letter out onto the middle of the table? Washington pointedly refused it. Paterson claimed the address “with the Addition of &c. &c. &c.—implied every thing that ought to follow.” Washington retorted that “it was true the &c. &c. &c. implied every thing & they also implied any thing.” Knox later wrote that Paterson looked “awe-struck, as if he was before something super-natural.” Washington had been dignified, even as he sent a message to the British. The American fight for freedom was not going away any time soon. P.S. The picture is of the British fleet assembling in New York harbor during the summer of 1776. FULL STORY: http://on.fb.me/1zBN8SB #TDIH #AmericanHistory #USHistory #freedom #liberty #1776 #NYC #NewYork #ComeAndTakeIt #DontTreadOnMe #GeorgeWashington #MCM #HS #HSMommas #homeschool 2w

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taraross1787 On this day in 1777, British Maj. Gen. Richard Prescott is captured. His seizure would ensure the return of American Maj. Gen. Charles Lee in a prisoner exchange. One author has called this event “the outstanding special operation of the Revolutionary War.” The operation was led by William Barton of Rhode Island. He had received unexpected intel about the location of Prescott, then in charge of the British troops occupying portions of Rhode Island. In early July, Barton made an appeal to the 1st Rhode Island regiment for help. He gave few details except to say that he needed help with “an enterprise against the enemy.” The entire regiment stepped forward to help! Those who were selected to participate were told the plan at the last minute. The party left late on July 10, rowing in complete silence, so as not to be detected. Once ashore, Barton’s men disembarked and divided into five groups: three were to go to the farmhouse, one was to guard the road, and the final group was on alert to deal with unanticipated problems. As the story goes, a sentinel detected the groups that were approaching the farmhouse. He called out to them, but Barton answered that they were “Friends.” The sentinel demanded a countersign. Barton responded: “We have no countersign to give; have you seen any deserters tonight?” At this, the Americans quickly took the sentinel prisoner. Just before midnight, Barton and his men simultaneously stormed all three farmhouse entrances. Barton demanded that Prescott be turned over immediately, or the farmhouse would be burned to the ground. The entire episode took about 7 minutes. By the time an alarm was raised, Barton’s party was already rowing away. Americans had escaped with their prize! P.S. The picture is of the farmhouse where Prescott was captured. FULL STORY: http://on.fb.me/1mjOOuy #TDIH #USHistory #throwbackthursday #TBT #liberty #Freedom #Revolution #tcot #HS #HSMommas #homeschool #RhodeIsland 3w

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