111 Posts

rachela_adler #MagRecon: Goddard Space Flight Center Integration and Test Timeline. #PlanetaryScience #Heliophysics #astrophysics #earthscience 5d

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todfen @TheSunToday #Heliophysics #MagRecon @nasagoddard Too many "Aha" moments! Learning. About space weather 5d
  •   the_ryan_b What is this exactly? 5d
  •   wafe_balocco Are these live? 5d
  •   todfen It's a talk on Heliophysics. It's part of the NASA Social event. We're learning about the MMS mission where NASA will send up 4 identical spacecraft to fly on a tetrahedron formation to take precise measurements of magnetic reconnection. It's a phenomenon that happens on earth, on the sun and even in black holes. We just can't study it on the sun, "because it's a little hot" NASA's words in quotations. Lol 5d

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americanpublicu #SpaceStudies: The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is a Solar Terrestrial Probes mission comprising four identically instrumented spacecraft that will use Earth’s magnetosphere as a laboratory to study the microphysics of three fundamental plasma processes: magnetic reconnection, energetic particle acceleration, and turbulence. These processes occur in all astrophysical plasma systems but can be studied in situ only in our solar system and most efficiently only in Earth’s magnetosphere, where they control the dynamics of the geospace environment and play an important role in the processes known as “space weather.” 5d

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rachela_adler The Heliophysics Science Division conducts research on the Sun, its extended solar-system environment (the heliosphere), and interactions of Earth, other planets, small bodies, and interstellar gas with the heliosphere. Division research also encompasses geospace -- Earth's uppermost atmosphere, the ionosphere, and the magnetosphere -- and the changing environmental conditions throughout the coupled heliosphere (solar system weather). 6d

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rachela_adler Dr. Jeffrey Newmark. Solar Physics Discipline Scientist. #Heliophysics Division. #NASAHeadquarters. Dr. Newmark from HQ tells how #MMS #MagRecon fits into @NASA mission to study sun's effects on Earth. 6d

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rachela_adler #MagRecon dr. Thomas E. Moore talking about #MMS and reconnection #NASAGoddard #NASA #Heliophysics 6d

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zoick regram @nasa
A dark snaking line in the upper right of this image on Sept. 30, 2014, show a filament of solar material hovering above the sun's surface. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth.
Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24 hours a day, has observed this gigantic filament for several days as it rotated around with the sun. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth. SDO captured the image in extreme UV light of 193 Angstrom and 335 Angstrom – different colors represent different wavelengths of light and different temperatures of solar material.

Credit: NASA/SDO

#nasa #space #sun #solar #sdo #uvlight #heliophysics #science
3w

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ckariso regram @nasa
A dark snaking line in the upper right of this image on Sept. 30, 2014, show a filament of solar material hovering above the sun's surface. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth.
Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24 hours a day, has observed this gigantic filament for several days as it rotated around with the sun. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth. SDO captured the image in extreme UV light of 193 Angstrom and 335 Angstrom – different colors represent different wavelengths of light and different temperatures of solar material.

Credit: NASA/SDO

#nasa #space #sun #solar #sdo #uvlight #heliophysics #science
3w

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firasdahab regram @nasa
A dark snaking line in the upper right of this image on Sept. 30, 2014, show a filament of solar material hovering above the sun's surface. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth.
Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24 hours a day, has observed this gigantic filament for several days as it rotated around with the sun. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth. SDO captured the image in extreme UV light of 193 Angstrom and 335 Angstrom – different colors represent different wavelengths of light and different temperatures of solar material.

Credit: NASA/SDO

#nasa #space #sun #solar #sdo #uvlight #heliophysics #science
3w

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Normal José Luis de la Orta Aguirre
josephl182 regram @nasa
A dark snaking line in the upper right of this image on Sept. 30, 2014, show a filament of solar material hovering above the sun's surface. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth.
Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24 hours a day, has observed this gigantic filament for several days as it rotated around with the sun. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth. SDO captured the image in extreme UV light of 193 Angstrom and 335 Angstrom – different colors represent different wavelengths of light and different temperatures of solar material.

Credit: NASA/SDO

#nasa #space #sun #solar #sdo #uvlight #heliophysics #science
3w

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Normal Али Юсуфов
ali_yusufov A dark snaking line in the upper right of this image on Sept. 30, 2014, show a filament of solar material hovering above the sun's surface. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth.
Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24 hours a day, has observed this gigantic filament for several days as it rotated around with the sun. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth. SDO captured the image in extreme UV light of 193 Angstrom and 335 Angstrom – different colors represent different wavelengths of light and different temperatures of solar material.

Credit: NASA/SDO

#nasa #space #sun #solar #sdo #uvlight #heliophysics #science

3w

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Normal Ron Bailey
ron_bailey3000 By @nasa "A dark snaking line in the upper right of this image on Sept. 30, 2014, show a filament of solar material hovering above the sun's surface. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth.
Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24 hours a day, has observed this gigantic filament for several days as it rotated around with the sun. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth. SDO captured the image in extreme UV light of 193 Angstrom and 335 Angstrom – different colors represent different wavelengths of light and different temperatures of solar material.

Credit: NASA/SDO

#nasa #space #sun #solar #sdo #uvlight #heliophysics #science" via @PhotoRepost_app
3w

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nasa A dark snaking line in the upper right of this image on Sept. 30, 2014, show a filament of solar material hovering above the sun's surface. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth.
Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun 24 hours a day, has observed this gigantic filament for several days as it rotated around with the sun. If straightened out, the filament would reach almost across the whole sun, about 1 million miles or 100 times the size of Earth. SDO captured the image in extreme UV light of 193 Angstrom and 335 Angstrom – different colors represent different wavelengths of light and different temperatures of solar material.

Credit: NASA/SDO

#nasa #space #sun #solar #sdo #uvlight #heliophysics #science
3w

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nstar777poems #Repost from @nasa with @repostapp

On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth. Together they helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/STEREO/ESA/SOHO/Wiessinger
#CMEWeek #CME #NASA #Sun #Heliophysics
4w

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zoick regram @nasa
On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth. Together they helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/STEREO/ESA/SOHO/Wiessinger
#CMEWeek #CME #NASA #Sun #Heliophysics
4w

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linepeace On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth. Together they helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/STEREO/ESA/SOHO/Wiessinger
#CMEWeek #CME #NASA #Sun #Heliophysics
4w

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Normal Yasin Meriçli Cayef
yasinmericli #Repost from @nasa with @repostapp

On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth. Together they helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/STEREO/ESA/SOHO/Wiessinger
#CMEWeek #CME #NASA #Sun #Heliophysics
4w

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dron184 regram @nasa
On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth. Together they helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/STEREO/ESA/SOHO/Wiessinger
#CMEWeek #CME #NASA #Sun #Heliophysics
4w

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Normal José Luis de la Orta Aguirre
josephl182 regram @nasa
On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth. Together they helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/STEREO/ESA/SOHO/Wiessinger
#CMEWeek #CME #NASA #Sun #Heliophysics
4w

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ron_bailey3000 By @nasa "On July 23, 2012, a massive cloud of solar material erupted off the sun's right side, zooming out into space. It soon passed one of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft, which clocked the CME as traveling between 1,800 and 2,200 miles per second as it left the sun. This was the fastest CME ever observed by STEREO.

Two other observatories – NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the joint European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory -- witnessed the eruption as well. The July 2012 CME didn't move toward Earth, but watching an unusually strong CME like this gives scientists an opportunity to observe how these events originate and travel through space.

STEREO's unique viewpoint from the sides of the sun combined with the other two observatories watching from closer to Earth. Together they helped scientists create models of the entire July 2012 event. They learned that an earlier, smaller CME helped clear the path for the larger event, thus contributing to its unusual speed.

Such data helps advance our understanding of what causes CMEs and improves modeling of similar CMEs that could be Earth-directed.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/STEREO/ESA/SOHO/Wiessinger
#CMEWeek #CME #NASA #Sun #Heliophysics" via @PhotoRepost_app
4w

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