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lenaplustwo By @nasagoddard "NASA Sees Massive Marie Close Enough to Affect Southern California Coast

On August 26 at 19:05 UTC (3:05 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Marie drawing in the small remnants of Karina. Marie is over 400 miles in diameter, about the distance from Washington, D.C. to Boston, Massachusetts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 205 miles (335 km). Because of Marie's large size and its movement to the north, it is creating rough surf that is now reaching southern California's shoreline. The National Hurricane Center noted that swells generated by Marie will continue to affect much of the west coast of the Baja California, Mexico peninsula and now including the extreme southern Gulf of California and southern California through Thursday, August 28. Life-threatening surf and rip current conditions are likely as a result of these swells as well as minor coastal flooding.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Marie's maximum sustained winds had decreased to near 75 mph (120 kph). Marie was centered near latitude 22.3 north and longitude 123.7 west. That's about 880 miles (1,415 km) west of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Marie is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kph) and is expected to turn to the northwest.

As Marie moves in a northerly direction it will be moving over progressively colder waters so the National Hurricane Center forecasts additional weakening in the next two days. My Thursday, Marie is expected to become a post-tropical cyclone.

Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response #nasagoddard #weather #marie #hurricane #california" via @PhotoRepost_app #happythursday #instathursday #1daytillfriday
21h

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hemojemo Don't mess with my Cali weekend, Marie... #nasagoddard #hurricanemarie 21h

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Normal NASA Goddard
nasagoddard NASA Sees Massive Marie Close Enough to Affect Southern California Coast

On August 26 at 19:05 UTC (3:05 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Marie drawing in the small remnants of Karina. Marie is over 400 miles in diameter, about the distance from Washington, D.C. to Boston, Massachusetts. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 205 miles (335 km). Because of Marie's large size and its movement to the north, it is creating rough surf that is now reaching southern California's shoreline. The National Hurricane Center noted that swells generated by Marie will continue to affect much of the west coast of the Baja California, Mexico peninsula and now including the extreme southern Gulf of California and southern California through Thursday, August 28. Life-threatening surf and rip current conditions are likely as a result of these swells as well as minor coastal flooding.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Marie's maximum sustained winds had decreased to near 75 mph (120 kph). Marie was centered near latitude 22.3 north and longitude 123.7 west. That's about 880 miles (1,415 km) west of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Marie is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kph) and is expected to turn to the northwest.

As Marie moves in a northerly direction it will be moving over progressively colder waters so the National Hurricane Center forecasts additional weakening in the next two days. My Thursday, Marie is expected to become a post-tropical cyclone.

Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response #nasagoddard #weather #marie #hurricane #california
21h
  •   gocraftbeer So, since hurricanes in the pacific are so rare, dies that mean the pacific is warming? 12h
  •   1cent_knight Proof of globaliza 11h
  •   1cent_knight Global warming weather changes in the USA and other countries throughout the world. 11h
  •   leoddykrueger Impressive! #Pretty 10h
  •   tobinnibot @tkent1288 good waves? 7h
  •   thedorklifeofjolene Girl: Am i pretty? Boy: no Girl:do u want 2 b w/ me 4 ever? Boy:no Girl: Would u cry if I walked away? Boy: no She had heard enough and was hurt. She turned to walk away but the bot grabs her arm. Boy: u aren't pretty... U r beautiful... I don't want 2 b w/ u 4 ever... I need 2 b w/ u 4 ever... I love you...and I wounldn't cry if u walked away I'd die. *whispers* stay with me. Girl I will. ~*tonight at midnight ur true love will realize he/she loves u* something good will happen to u 1-4 pm tomorrow, it could b anywhere! * get ready 4 the shock of your life* if you don't post this to 5 other comments u will have bad luck in relationships for the next 10 years. 2h

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Normal Aislynn Fabiola G. Manuel
aislynnfabiola "Sparky" galaxy! Sublime!

#Repost from @nasagoddard with @repostapp

NASA Telescopes Uncover Early Construction of Giant Galaxy

Astronomers have for the first time caught a glimpse of the earliest stages of massive galaxy construction. The building site, dubbed “Sparky,” is a dense galactic core blazing with the light of millions of newborn stars that are forming at a ferocious rate.

The discovery was made possible through combined observations from NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, the W.M. Keck Observatory in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the European Space Agency's Herschel space observatory, in which NASA plays an important role.

A fully developed elliptical galaxy is a gas-deficient gathering of ancient stars theorized to develop from the inside out, with a compact core marking its beginnings. Because the galactic core is so far away, the light of the forming galaxy that is observable from Earth was actually created 11 billion years ago, just 3 billion years after the Big Bang. Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1rAMSSr

Credit: NASA, Z. Levay, G. Bacon (STScI) #nasagoddard #hubble #space #galaxy #sparky
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crewislife #Repost from @nasagoddard --- NASA Telescopes Uncover Early Construction of Giant Galaxy

Astronomers have for the first time caught a glimpse of the earliest stages of massive galaxy construction. The building site, dubbed “Sparky,” is a dense galactic core blazing with the light of millions of newborn stars that are forming at a ferocious rate.

The discovery was made possible through combined observations from NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, the W.M. Keck Observatory in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the European Space Agency's Herschel space observatory, in which NASA plays an important role.

A fully developed elliptical galaxy is a gas-deficient gathering of ancient stars theorized to develop from the inside out, with a compact core marking its beginnings. Because the galactic core is so far away, the light of the forming galaxy that is observable from Earth was actually created 11 billion years ago, just 3 billion years after the Big Bang. Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1rAMSSr

Credit: NASA, Z. Levay, G. Bacon (STScI) #nasagoddard #hubble #space #galaxy #sparky
2d

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Normal NASA Goddard
nasagoddard NASA Telescopes Uncover Early Construction of Giant Galaxy

Astronomers have for the first time caught a glimpse of the earliest stages of massive galaxy construction. The building site, dubbed “Sparky,” is a dense galactic core blazing with the light of millions of newborn stars that are forming at a ferocious rate.

The discovery was made possible through combined observations from NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, the W.M. Keck Observatory in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the European Space Agency's Herschel space observatory, in which NASA plays an important role.

A fully developed elliptical galaxy is a gas-deficient gathering of ancient stars theorized to develop from the inside out, with a compact core marking its beginnings. Because the galactic core is so far away, the light of the forming galaxy that is observable from Earth was actually created 11 billion years ago, just 3 billion years after the Big Bang. Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1rAMSSr

Credit: NASA, Z. Levay, G. Bacon (STScI) #nasagoddard #hubble #space #galaxy #sparky
2d

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Normal Victoria Escudeiro
vikkiesc Good night
#Repost from @nasagoddard
Credit: ESA and NASA #nasagoddard #hubble #space #star #galaxy
2d
  •   clararfr As boas energias do universo.. 2d

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nasagoddard On the evening of May 23, 2014, several supercell thunderstorms rumbled along the border between North and South Carolina and dropped significant amounts of hail. Much of the hail was quarter-sized, but the strongest storms unloaded chunks of ice as large as baseballs, according to National Weather Service staff in Columbia, South Carolina. As observers on the ground documented the hail pummeling the ground, NASA’s high-flying ER-2 aircraft flew high overhead.

During one flight, pilot Stu Broce took this photograph of the overshooting top of a storm over North Carolina. For perspective, the storm was about 50,000 feet (15,000 meters) tall, while the ER-2 cruised at an altitude of 65,000 feet (20,000 meters). (Commercial airliners usually fly at about 30,000 feet or 9,000 meters.) Overshooting tops are dome-like protrusions at the top of thunderstorms that provide evidence of very strong updrafts. Severe storms tend to have larger and longer-lived overshooting tops than less intense storms.

The ER-2 flight was part of the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), a field campaign designed to improve understanding of precipitation over mountainous terrain.

Photograph courtesy of Stu Broce and the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment team. #nasagoddard #supercell #weather #space #hail
4d

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geraldokerenzau Tropical Storm Lowell Becomes 7th Eastern Pacific Hurricane of te Season.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite watched as Tropical Storm Lowell strengthened into a large hurricane during the morning of August 21 and opened its eye.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center, while tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). The storm stretches over a greater distance.

Lowell become the seventh hurricane of te Eastern Pacific Ocean season today, August 21 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC). Maximum sustained winds had increased to 75 mph (120 kph) making Lowell a Category One hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) today, and NHC forecasters expect a slow weakening trend later today through August 22.

The NHC said tat Lowell should begin to slowly weaken by August 22 as it moves over progressively cooler waters and into a drier and more stable air mass. Since Lowell is such a large cyclone, it will likely take longer than average to spin down.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project

#Nasagoddard #hurricane #Lowell #pacificocean #weather
6d

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yagisci_mpi regram @nasagoddard
Tropical Storm Lowell Becomes 7th Eastern Pacific Hurricane of the season.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite watched as Tropical Storm Lowell strengthened into a large hurricane during the morning of August 21 and opened its eye.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center, while tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). The storm stretches over a greater distance.

Lowell became the seventh hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season today, August 21 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC). Maximum sustained winds had increased to 75 mph (120 kph) making Lowell a Category One hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) today, and NHC forecasters expect a slow weakening trend later today through August 22.

The NHC said that Lowell should begin to slowly weaken by August 22 as it moves over progressively cooler waters and into a drier and more stable air mass. Since Lowell is such a large cyclone, it will likely take longer than average to spin down.

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #hurricane #Lowell #PacificOcean #weather
6d

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Amaro Francisco José Alvarez Pérez
franjoalpez #Repost from @nasagoddard with @repostapp --- Tropical Storm Lowell Becomes 7th Eastern Pacific Hurricane of the season.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite watched as Tropical Storm Lowell strengthened into a large hurricane during the morning of August 21 and opened its eye.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center, while tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). The storm stretches over a greater distance.

Lowell became the seventh hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season today, August 21 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC). Maximum sustained winds had increased to 75 mph (120 kph) making Lowell a Category One hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) today, and NHC forecasters expect a slow weakening trend later today through August 22.

The NHC said that Lowell should begin to slowly weaken by August 22 as it moves over progressively cooler waters and into a drier and more stable air mass. Since Lowell is such a large cyclone, it will likely take longer than average to spin down.

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #hurricane #Lowell #PacificOcean #weather
7d

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zoick regram @nasagoddard
Tropical Storm Lowell Becomes 7th Eastern Pacific Hurricane of the season.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite watched as Tropical Storm Lowell strengthened into a large hurricane during the morning of August 21 and opened its eye.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center, while tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). The storm stretches over a greater distance.

Lowell became the seventh hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season today, August 21 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC). Maximum sustained winds had increased to 75 mph (120 kph) making Lowell a Category One hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) today, and NHC forecasters expect a slow weakening trend later today through August 22.

The NHC said that Lowell should begin to slowly weaken by August 22 as it moves over progressively cooler waters and into a drier and more stable air mass. Since Lowell is such a large cyclone, it will likely take longer than average to spin down.

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #hurricane #Lowell #PacificOcean #weather
7d

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Normal NASA Goddard
nasagoddard Tropical Storm Lowell Becomes 7th Eastern Pacific Hurricane of the season.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite watched as Tropical Storm Lowell strengthened into a large hurricane during the morning of August 21 and opened its eye.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center, while tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). The storm stretches over a greater distance.

Lowell became the seventh hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season today, August 21 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC). Maximum sustained winds had increased to 75 mph (120 kph) making Lowell a Category One hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) today, and NHC forecasters expect a slow weakening trend later today through August 22.

The NHC said that Lowell should begin to slowly weaken by August 22 as it moves over progressively cooler waters and into a drier and more stable air mass. Since Lowell is such a large cyclone, it will likely take longer than average to spin down.

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #hurricane #Lowell #PacificOcean #weather
7d

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geraldokerenzau How The Sun Caused on Aurora This Week
On the evening of Aug. 20, 2014. The International Space Station was flying past North America when it flew over the dazzling, green blue lights of an aurora. On board, astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this image of the aurora, seen from above.

This aurora display was due to a giant cloud of gas from the sun - a coronal mass ejection or CME - that collided with Earth's magnetic fields on Aug. 19, 2014, at 1:57 a.m. EDT. This event set off, as it often does, what's called a geomagnetic storm. This is a king of space weather event where the magnetic fields surrounding Earth compress and release. This oscill nation is much like a spring moving back and forth, but unlike a spring, moving magnetic fields cause an unstable envinronment, setting charged particles movin and initiating electric currents.
Credit: NASA

#Nasagoddard #iss #space #sun #earth #aurora
1w

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Normal Jay
funnytodler #Repost from @nasagoddard with @repostapp Blue Marble, Eastern Hemisphere -- Image acquired March 30, 2014.
Of all the planets NASA has explored, none have matched the dynamic complexity of our own. Earth is constantly changing, and NASA are working constantly to explore and understand the planet on scales from local to global.

Though Earth science has been a key part of NASA’s mission since the agency was founded in 1958, this year has been one of the peaks. Two new Earth-observing satellites have already been launched and put to work: the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2). Three more missions are set to take off in the next six months: the wind-measuring ISS-RapidScat, the ISS Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). And research planes have been flying over polar ice, hurricanes, boreal forests, and pollution plumes.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Suomi NPP VIIRS imagery from NOAA's Environmental Visualization Laboratory. Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, NOAA and the Department of Defense. Caption by Mike Carlowicz. You can read more about this image at earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory #nasagoddard #BlueMarble #EarthRightNow #earth
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daddykool #Repost from @nasagoddard with @repostapp ---
Photo taken March 30, 2014
Blue Marble, Eastern Hemisphere -- Image acquired March 30, 2014.

Of all the planets NASA has explored, none have matched the dynamic complexity of our own. Earth is constantly changing, and NASA are working constantly to explore and understand the planet on scales from local to global.

Though Earth science has been a key part of NASA’s mission since the agency was founded in 1958, this year has been one of the peaks. Two new Earth-observing satellites have already been launched and put to work: the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2). Three more missions are set to take off in the next six months: the wind-measuring ISS-RapidScat, the ISS Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). And research planes have been flying over polar ice, hurricanes, boreal forests, and pollution plumes.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Suomi NPP VIIRS imagery from NOAA's Environmental Visualization Laboratory. Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, NOAA and the Department of Defense. Caption by Mike Carlowicz. You can read more about this image at earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory #nasagoddard #BlueMarble #EarthRightNow #earth
1w

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yagisci_mpi Beautiful...regram @nasagoddard
Blue Marble, Eastern Hemisphere -- Image acquired March 30, 2014.

Of all the planets NASA has explored, none have matched the dynamic complexity of our own. Earth is constantly changing, and NASA are working constantly to explore and understand the planet on scales from local to global.

Though Earth science has been a key part of NASA’s mission since the agency was founded in 1958, this year has been one of the peaks. Two new Earth-observing satellites have already been launched and put to work: the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2). Three more missions are set to take off in the next six months: the wind-measuring ISS-RapidScat, the ISS Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). And research planes have been flying over polar ice, hurricanes, boreal forests, and pollution plumes.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Suomi NPP VIIRS imagery from NOAA's Environmental Visualization Laboratory. Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, NOAA and the Department of Defense. Caption by Mike Carlowicz. You can read more about this image at earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory #nasagoddard #BlueMarble #EarthRightNow #earth
1w

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