smithsonian In @cooperhewitt’s Immersion Room, visitors can view—and project—the museum’s extraordinary collection of wallcoverings in full scale on the walls around them. Using the interactive Pen, you can also play designer by creating your own designs. Design by @muhreegrace #ImmersionRoom #WallpaperWednesday 1d

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smithsonian Earlier this month, @cooperhewitt announced the winners of the annual National Design Awards, which recognize excellence and innovation in 11 categories. First Lady Michelle Obama serves as the Honorary Patron for the awards, which was first launched at the White House in 2000 as a project of the White House Millennium Council.
This year’s recipient for Lifetime Achievement, Moshe Safdie is a leading architect, urban planner, educator, theorist and author, who explores the essential principles of socially responsible design with a distinct visual language. His Yad Vashem Holocaust History Museum in Jerusalem, part of Israel’s official memorial to the victims of the Holocaust, consists of a mostly underground prismatic structure that utilizes a subterranean organization as a narrative device. #NDAwards2016
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smithsonian For @cooperhewitt’s fifth contemporary #DesignTriennial, “Beauty” celebrates design as a creative endeavor that engages the mind, body, and senses. With a focus on aesthetic innovation, the exhibition features more than 250 works by 63 designers from around the globe, organized into seven themes: extravagant, intricate, ethereal, transgressive, emergent, elemental, and transformative.
Designer Jenny Sabin’s architectural forms are inspired by nature and mathematics. PolyThread (2016) is a temporary pavilion commissioned for the Triennial. This knitted textile structure employs photoluminescent and solar active yarns that absorb, collect, and deliver light. Portable and lightweight, such a structure could be used outdoors to absorb light from the sun during the day and release it at night.
Sabin will be in conversation with curator @ellenlupton at Cooper Hewitt on Wednesday, June 1.
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smithsonian Hello! This is Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (@cooperhewitt). We will be taking over the Smithsonian account this week and sharing historic and contemporary design from our home in NYC.
Located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, our landmark building was once home to Andrew Carnegie and his family, who built the mansion in 1902 and lived there until the mid-20th century.
Designed in the Georgian Revival-style with strong Beaux Arts elements by architecture firm Babb, Cook & Willard, it housed the Columbia University School of Social Work for two decades before the Smithsonian Institution transformed the building into Cooper Hewitt in 1976
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smithsonian How we roll on #biketoworkday: A Copeland steam-propelled tricycle
In this photo from 1888, Lucius D. Copeland gives a demonstration of his invention in front of our Castle Building. The 4 horsepower steam engine was capable of powering the bike at up to 15 miles per hour.
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smithsonian From protests to quasi-postcards, there's a surprisingly long history of people mailing coconuts—and them actually being delivered.
This one was sent in a campaign to save the Lantana Post Office in Florida. Residents mailed about 1,000 coconuts to the Postmaster General, asking him to spare their local office from planned closure in 2009. It worked, and the fruit was donated to a local food pantry, except for this one which is now in our National Postal Museum.
Today, it can cost $4 to $17 to mail a coconut. #TheMoreYouKnow
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smithsonian Filed away in a basement for years, photos from the early days of hip-hop are now in the collection of our @nmaahc.
Here’s Salt-N-Pepa at Bayside studios, in one of more than 400 snapshots from the 1980s to the early 2000s that offer a glimpse of the hip-hop world before it became a massive industry. They include the work of amateurs and professionals, and capture artists like Grandmaster Flash, Flavor Flav, Run-DMC, Queen Latifah and LL Cool J.
The photos were collected by a music writer who eventually opened an art gallery for their display. While the gallery has closed, the set will live on at our newest museum, though it won't be on display when @nmaahc opens Sept. 24.
Photo by Al Pereira. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
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smithsonian On this day in 1923, Amelia Earhart was the first woman to receive an airplane pilot's certificate from the National Aeronautic Association. This is her flight suit from our National Postal Museum.
Why is it in a postal museum? While Earhart wasn’t a licesnsed airmail pilot, she did transport mail as a way of fundraising for her flights. She carried and autographed special letters that were sold to stamp enthusiasts.
Leather, wool-lined suits like this one were critical for long-distance flights because early airplanes didn’t offer much protection from the elements, and it gets chilly 20,000 feet in the air.
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smithsonian Yesterday we got a sneak peek tour of @nmaahc, and we’re pretty obsessed with this view from the fourth floor.
We're looking out through the museum’s patterned outer layer, which is meant to evoke 19th-century ironwork by enslaved craftsmen in New Orleans. It allows daylight to come in through the openings, but also will shine light outside at night, as if the Corona is glowing from within.
See more of the tour on our Twitter account, and follow #BuildNMAAHC as we prepare for the National Museum of African American History and Culture to open Sept. 24.
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smithsonian For months, artist Linn Meyers has been drawing on the walls of our @hirshhorn, creating a 360-degree, site-specific exhibition. Today, #OurViewFromHere is complete and officially open.
Visitors have been able to watch Meyers at work for the last five weeks, as she puts in up to 12 hours each day hand drawing across hundreds of feet of gallery wall.
Meyers has taken over the @hirshhorn’s Instagram account leading up to the opening—you can see her view of the process on their account.
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smithsonian The relationship between the horse and Native America is legendary. Many artists from different regions create masks like this one, an Assiniboine/Sioux horse mask by Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty in 2008. Today, masks are mostly used as artistic inspiration. “A Song for the Horse Nation: Horses in Native American Cultures,” was first featured in New York from 2009 to 2011, and then at in D.C. from 2011 to 2013 due to its popularity. The exhibition followed the journey of the creature in Native cultures beginning with the return of the horse on the second voyage of Columbus to the present-day American Indian horse fairs in the west—the largest gathering of horses in the United States.
For the 100th anniversary of its collection’s establishment, follow @smithsoniannmai for more images, including behind-the-scenes shots of exhibitions and collections.
Visit AmericanIndian.si.edu to learn about all of the past, current and future exhibitions at the museum.
#legaciesoflearning #gala100 #NDN #NativeAmerican
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smithsonian The National Museum of the American Indian (@smithsoniannmai) is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the establishment of its collection. Started by George Gustav Heye in 1916 and officially part of the Smithsonian since 1989, it’s the largest and most significant collection representing the vibrant cultures and astounding histories of the indigenous peoples of Western Hemisphere.
These well-preserved gold discs are from the Lambayeque people of Peru, and may have been worn on clothing. From about years 750 to 1375, they depict powerful figures wearing elaborate crowns, ear spools and checkered ponchos.
The discs are from one of the museum’s permanent exhibitions, “Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian” at the George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. It has more than 700 objects from Native cultures across 10 regions of the Western Hemisphere, spanning the Patagonia region to the Arctic and Subarctic, following the Native peoples of the Americas from their earliest history to the present day.
#legaciesoflearning #gala100 #NDN #NativeAmerican
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smithsonian You might not know it, but mites are everywhere, in all shapes and sizes. This one (Novophytoptus juncus) might even be cute, until you realize that those aren’t eyes—they’re the mite’s hind quarters.
There are an estimated 3 to 5 million species of mites across the globe, and about 1 million specimens in the collection of our @smithsoniannmnh. A state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope allows us to get some face time with them in a series of super-detailed photos.
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smithsonian The first #CincoDeMayo festivities probably didn’t include margaritas.
Cinco de Mayo isn't a celebration of Mexico's independence (that’s in September), but a holiday for the Mexican army’s victory over the French at the Battle of Puebla in 1862.
Margaritas weren’t invented until the 1940s, though. They became popular in the next few decades and Mariano Martinez, inspired by those slushy drinks at convenience stores, created the first frozen margarita machine around 1971. Now it’s in our @amhistorymuseum.
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smithsonian Our traveling exhibition of #StarWarsCostumes is impressive. Most impressive.
With more than 60 pieces from the films, @sitesexhibitions’ “Rebel, Jedi, Princess, Queen: Star Wars and the Power of Costume” is currently at Discovery Times Square in New York City through September. After that, it will tour the country until 2019.
The costumes include Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, C-3PO, R2-D2, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Princess Leia and Chewbacca, along with props and concept art.
#MayThe4thBeWithYou #StarWars #StarWarsDay #MayThe4th
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smithsonian Politicians trying to get the youth vote isn’t anything new, but back in the day, it involved capes.
Let us explain: In the late 1800s, youth were heavily involved in politics, whether it was joining their fathers in the saloon for late-night discussion of politics, giving speeches on behalf of candidates, or marching together in a parade wearing matching uniforms, including capes.
Campaigners pushed hard to woo youngsters, because at age 21 (the voting age then), a young man cast his “virgin vote” – a right of manhood and a commitment to remain monogamous to this chosen party for the rest of his life.
One of those uniform capes made its way to the political history division of our @amhistorymuseum, where it’s pictured here on this slightly creepy child mannequin.
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  •   elmaspelon72 I'm quite fond of the "slightly creepy child mannequin" 3w
  •   sarahsuthoff That's what modern politics needs more capes 3w
  •   drydoll2001 "Slightly creepy child mannequin" - I'm glad you said it. 3w
  •   antheasybil Great post. Let's swap the wig for one with a hairstyle of the era, we'll go from creepy to cutie. 3w

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smithsonian The pollen count is high in this piece by Wolfgang Laib, from the collection of our @hirshhorn.
Laib described pollen as the important potential start of the life of the plant. In “Pollen from Hazelnut,” 1998–2000, yellow spores are sifted directly onto the floor in a large rectangular pattern – similar to the area of color in an abstract Color Field painting – a process repeated for each installation.
Thankfully, our curators report limited sneezes.
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smithsonian Know where to see one of the @SmithsonianGardens living collections? Here’s a hint: look up! The @Smithsonian Tree Collection has close to 1,900 specimens planted around its museums and other facilities.
You can recognize these trees by the small, numbered tags they wear. Here specimens 1237, a Mr. Fuji cherry (Prunus ‘Shirotae’), and 1173, an Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana), model their bling.
The oldest tree is the Smithsonian Witness Elm (pictured left), a majestic American elm (Ulmus Americana) near the Butterfly Habitat Garden and @Smithsoniannmnh. The tree is estimated to be more than 200 years old and is 17.75 feet around and over 85 feet tall.
Thanks for following our @Smithsonian Instagram takeover. Keep up with us at @SmithsonianGardens for more pictures of plants and gardens around the Smithsonian.
#NationalGardenMonth #trees #livingcollection
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smithsonian Celebrate #NationalGardenMonth with a stroll through some of the retro treasures in the Archives of American Gardens at @SmithsonianGardens! The archive includes more than 80,000 images of U.S. gardens from the 1870s to the present.
Images like this World War II-era victory garden photograph from the J. Horace McFarland Company Collection give us a glimpse into historic garden (and fashion!) trends.
Thousands more images from the AAG set are now digitized and available to view online through the Smithsonian Collections Search Center (collections.si.edu). Take a look to see how we’re preserving garden heritage one pixel at a time.
We’re @SmithsonianGardens, and we’ve taken over the Smithsonian’s Instagram account this week. Follow us to see more garden treasures from our collections.
#archives #gardens #tbt
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smithsonian It shouldn’t be a surprise that everything in the Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden is coming up, well, #roses!
After nearly two decades, @SmithsonianGardens is expanding and renovating this treasured garden. The diverse new plant palate planned will mean a beautiful and scented space with less pressure from disease or pests. Plan to stop by to smell the roses (like this “Angel Face”) when the garden reopens later this summer.
You can also follow us on Instagram (@SmithsonianGardens) or on Twitter (@SIGardens) for project updates.
#gardens #beautiful #smelltheroses #NationalGardenMonth
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