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nedim_nazerali What a lovely morning didn't even need to see the eclipse! @melnazerali 7d

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nedim_nazerali Characteristics of my Tiggs #waitingforthemorningrise 5.45am 20.03.2015 #solareclipse #equinox @melnazerali 7d

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nedim_nazerali A guy left this on the tube for us, I didn't have any money on me but still let me keep this pack of tissues and the message. #helpothers #weareallone #love #compassion #letssayaprayer 1w

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nedim_nazerali This special post is for my Brother @cc_sedgwick - iv never noticed not seeing the moon in the sky. #sheiscoming #solareclipse #200315 #supermoon2015 #springequinox #perigeemoon #3rdsupermoon2015
From about 8.30am on Friday March 20, 2015, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun casting darkness across swathes of the Earth's surface, including the British Isles.

The equinox will also happen on March 20. While it won’t have any discernable, direct impact on how the solar eclipse looks, it will contribute to a rare collision of three unusual celestial events.
On March 20, the Earth’s axis will be perpindecular to the sun’s rays — which only happens twice a year, at the two equinoxes. After that, it will start tipping over, making the days longer in the northern hemisphere.
As such, the equinox has long been celebrated as a time of beginning and renewal, by a number of historic cultures, and is linked to Easter and Passover.
The equinox will happen at the same time as a solar eclipse in 2053 and 2072, though it doesn’t always appear as close together as that.
1w

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