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nasagoddard Tropical Storm Lowell Becomes 7th Eastern Pacific Hurricane of the season.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite watched as Tropical Storm Lowell strengthened into a large hurricane during the morning of August 21 and opened its eye.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the center, while tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). The storm stretches over a greater distance.

Lowell became the seventh hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season today, August 21 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC). Maximum sustained winds had increased to 75 mph (120 kph) making Lowell a Category One hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) today, and NHC forecasters expect a slow weakening trend later today through August 22.

The NHC said that Lowell should begin to slowly weaken by August 22 as it moves over progressively cooler waters and into a drier and more stable air mass. Since Lowell is such a large cyclone, it will likely take longer than average to spin down.

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #hurricane #Lowell #PacificOcean #weather
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nasagoddard Blue Marble, Eastern Hemisphere -- Image acquired March 30, 2014.

Of all the planets NASA has explored, none have matched the dynamic complexity of our own. Earth is constantly changing, and NASA are working constantly to explore and understand the planet on scales from local to global.

Though Earth science has been a key part of NASA’s mission since the agency was founded in 1958, this year has been one of the peaks. Two new Earth-observing satellites have already been launched and put to work: the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2). Three more missions are set to take off in the next six months: the wind-measuring ISS-RapidScat, the ISS Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). And research planes have been flying over polar ice, hurricanes, boreal forests, and pollution plumes.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using Suomi NPP VIIRS imagery from NOAA's Environmental Visualization Laboratory. Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, NOAA and the Department of Defense. Caption by Mike Carlowicz. You can read more about this image at earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory #nasagoddard #BlueMarble #EarthRightNow #earth
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nasagoddard How the Sun Caused an Aurora This Week -- On the evening of Aug. 20, 2014, the International Space Station was flying past North America when it flew over the dazzling, green blue lights of an aurora. On board, astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this image of the aurora, seen from above.

This auroral display was due to a giant cloud of gas from the sun – a coronal mass ejection or CME – that collided with Earth's magnetic fields on Aug. 19, 2014, at 1:57 a.m. EDT. This event set off, as it often does, what's called a geomagnetic storm. This is a kind of space weather event where the magnetic fields surrounding Earth compress and release. This oscillation is much like a spring moving back and forth, but unlike a spring, moving magnetic fields cause an unstable environment, setting charged particles moving and initiating electric currents.

Credit: NASA #nasagoddard #ISS #space #sun #earth #aurora
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nasagoddard Hubble Stirs Up Galactic Soup

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a whole host of colorful and differently shaped galaxies; some bright and nearby, some fuzzy, and some so far from us they appear as small specks in the background sky. Together they appear as kind of galactic soup.

The most prominent characters are the two galaxies on the left — 2MASX J16133219+5103436 at the bottom, and its blue-tinted companion SDSS J161330.18+510335 at the top. The latter is slightly closer to us than its partner, but the two are still near enough to one another to interact. Together, the two make up a galactic pair named Zw I 136.

Both galaxies in this pair have disturbed shapes and extended soft halos. They don’t seem to conform to our view of a “typical” galaxy — unlike the third bright object in this frame, a side-on spiral seen towards the right of the image.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

#nasagoddard #space #Hubble #galaxy #sky #star
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nasagoddard Hubble Revisits a Globular Cluster’s Age -- Globular clusters are big balls of old stars that orbit around their host galaxy. It has long been believed that all the stars within a globular cluster form at the about same time, a property which can be used to determine the cluster's age. For more massive globulars however, detailed observations have shown that this is not entirely true — there is evidence that they instead consist of multiple populations of stars born at different times. One of the driving forces behind this behavior is thought to be gravity: more massive globulars manage to grab more gas and dust, which can then be transformed into new stars.

Credit: ESA and NASA #nasagoddard #hubble #space #star #galaxy
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nasagoddard Exploring our galaxy's dark side -- Clouds of gas and dust fill the space between the stars. Like giant puffs of smoke, these cosmic particles have a tendency to obscure objects from detection. But by using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, researchers can look through the clouds and see the heat radiated from distant stars, planets and even other galaxies. Since 2003, the telescope has utilized wavelengths in the infrared spectrum to uncover a hidden universe of never-before-seen places and phenomenon. Here are four mind-blowing images of the Milky Way taken by Spitzer.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Images courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech
Writer: Izumi Hansen (@imiliarose) #space #nasagoddard #MilkyWay #clouds
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nasagoddard Just how super is this weekend's #Supermoon? This Super! learn more: www.nasa.gov/lro Follow #NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter on Twitter here: @LRO_NASA 2w

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nasagoddard Camera geeks, check out this glass. This is an exploded view of the CubeSat-class 50-millimeter (2-inch) camera that technologist Jason Budinoff is manufacturing with #3D-printed parts.
Credit: NASA Goddard/Jason Budinoff
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nasagoddard A thin solar prominence appeared above the Sun, then sprouted numerous streams of plasma back into the Sun before disappearing a day later (July 28-29, 2014). The prominence and its streams are being controlled by forces associated with strong magnetic fields beneath the prominence. These images were taken in extreme ultraviolet light, 304 wavelength. Credit: NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory 2w

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nasagoddard Engineers installed a new camera system on MABEL for its summer 2014 campaign, so scientists could better understand what it measured during flights. A key goal of the Alaska-based campaign was to measure glacial melt ponds like this one, photographed July 16.
Image Credit: NASA. #NASAinAlaska
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nasagoddard This may look like a work of abstract art, but in reality, it's our Moon and is for science.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC, is a system of three cameras mounted on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that capture high resolution photos of the lunar surface.

This colorful image is an LROC slope map of the northwestern portion of the floor of Posidonius crater. Warmer colors indicate steeper slopes, whereas cooler colors are shallower slopes. A rille winds its way across the floor and flows along a southerly course, diverging from its path along the crater rim. A tributary rille (or narrow channel) can be seen joining the main rille at the bottom center. Image width is approximately 3.4 miles. North is up.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University #nasagoddard #moon
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  •   xiaoyu1025 Art of nature 3w
  •   addmcm In reality, it is both a work of abstract art in the form of a photograph.. And a tool used for science. The cosmos will always be just that. No more lines drawn between science and art. Lets embrace the truth.. We are all scientists discovering existence in our own way:) 3w
  •   michellew.14  3w
  •   b_radyy omg what lush bath bomb is this 3w
  •   sadiebridger I would like to use that camera for just an hr. 3w
  •   lives4adventures @cassgoes - nature + science ...turns into art 5d
  •   cassgoes @lives4adventures damn right, you brilliant lady! 5d

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nasagoddard In this image, we line up a 1972 photograph of our magnetic coil facility at NASA Goddard with a shot of the facility as it appears today. The old photo shows testing of the #Apollo 17 #moon rover - which measured the moon's magnetic field in December.
Scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, calibrated the magnetometers on the lunar rover. These instruments are still used today to detect magnetic fields emitted by ore deposits, solar storms, submarines, and buried treasure. During the Apollo missions, engineers had outfitted the rover with these instruments to find out how the moon was formed. The scientists used this coil facility in order to ensure that the rover’s magnetometer did not accidentally measure its own hardware’s magnetic field. The astronauts found no magnetic field resembling the one we have here on Earth.
By sending electric currents through the metal coils, the magnetic facility can nullify a geomagnetic field the size of an elephant. NASA uses this method to calibrate magnetometers on spacecraft. The Magnetospheric Multiscale satellites’ have already have passed through to calibrate instruments that measure space weather. The entire Deep Space Climate Observatory will enter the chamber in August to correct for its EPIC camera’s magnetism. In addition, the MAVEN spacecraft that will arrive in orbit around Mars in September is outfitted with two magnetometers to observe how solar wind interacts with the Martian atmosphere. #TBT #ThrowbackThursday #DearPhotograph
Credit: NASA/Goddard/@kbasham1
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X-Pro II NASA Goddard
nasagoddard The Sunshield on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is the largest part of the observatory—five layers of thin membrane that must unfurl reliably in space to precise tolerances. Last week, for the first time, engineers stacked and unfurled a full-sized test unit of the Sunshield and it worked perfectly.

The Sunshield is about the length of a tennis court, and will be folded up like an umbrella around the Webb telescope’s mirrors and instruments during launch. Once it reaches its orbit, the Webb telescope will receive a command from Earth to unfold, and separate the Sunshield's five layers into their precisely stacked arrangement with its kite-like shape.

The Sunshield separates the observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold side where the sunshine is blocked from interfering with the sensitive infrared instruments. The infrared instruments need to be kept very cold (under 50 K or -370 degrees F) to operate. The Sunshield protects these sensitive instruments with an effective sun protection factor or SPF of 1,000,000 (suntan lotion generally has an SPF of 8-50). In addition to providing a cold environment, the Sunshield provides a thermally stable environment. This stability is essential to maintaining proper alignment of the primary mirror segments as the telescope changes its orientation to the sun.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn #JWST #WEBB #space
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nasagoddard NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory Celebrates 15th Anniversary

Fifteen years ago, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched into space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Since its deployment on July 23, 1999, Chandra has helped revolutionize our understanding of the universe through its unrivaled X-ray vision.

Chandra, one of NASA's current "Great Observatories," along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions of the universe.

To celebrate Chandra's 15th anniversary, these four new images of supernova remnants – the Crab Nebula, Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58 – are being released. These supernova remnants are very hot and energetic and glow brightly in X-ray light, which allows Chandra to capture them in exquisite detail.

Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO #space #universe #supernova
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nasagoddard This false color image of the Birt E crater shows the topography of the moon. This crater is thought to be the source region for lava that carved out Rima Birt, a rille in Mare Nubium. This mare is older than 3.4 billion years, and so is this vent.

Birt E crater was not created like most craters on the Moon; there was no meteorite impact. Lava sputtered out of this pyroclastic vent in Mare Nubium over 3.4 billion years ago, dispersing lava onto the surface and leaving the crater we see today. How can we tell it is a volcanic vent and not an impact crater? Impact craters and volcanic vents can be differentiated because vents often have an irregular or elongated shape (as with Birt E). Impact craters are usually circular in shape, created by the shockwave during an impact event.

Also, the vee-shape of this crater is likely a product of the formation mechanism. Vee-shaped vents are thought to be formed from a pyroclastic eruption. Gasses fractionating out of the liquid rock create violent events during eruptions. Explosive eruptions created the shape that we see today, but Birt E could have had a complex history with effusive eruptions forming Rima Birt, a rille flowing from Birt E to the SE.

Over long enough time scales Birt E will be filled in with ejecta from newly formed craters around Mare Nubium or by mass wasting of the walls into the crater. Let’s enjoy this ancient crater today while we still can.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University #nasagoddard #moon
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nasagoddard Wondering why you're wearing long sleeves in the middle of JULY? This cold front is the reason.

Summertime heat and humidity in the U.S. East Coast is on hold for a couple of days thanks to a cold front and that brought clouds, showers, thunderstorms, and some severe weather on July 16 to the coast.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) noted that the dip in the jet stream will create below normal temperatures for most of the Central and Eastern U.S. for the next couple of days. NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an image of the clouds associated with the cold front on July 16 at 1630 UTC (12:30 p.m. EDT).The clouds follow the front which stretches from the Florida panhandle, across Florida and up the U.S. East Coast into eastern Canada. Along the front lie two areas of low pressure, one over eastern New England, and the other offshore from South Carolina. Both of those low pressure areas are associated with additional cloudiness along the front.

Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Text: Rob Gutro #nasagoddard #weather #summer #clouds
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nasagoddard Hubble Sees Spiral Bridge of Young Stars Between Two Ancient Galaxies -- It seems like our compulsive universe can be downright capricious when it comes to making oddball-looking things in the cosmos. The latest surprise to Hubble astronomers is a 100,000-light-year-long structure that looks like a string of pearls twisted into a corkscrew shape. This Slinky-like structure forms a bridge between two giant elliptical galaxies that are colliding. The "pearls" on the Slinky are superclusters of blazing, blue-white, newly born stars. The whole assembly, which looks like a tug-of-war, must result from the gravitational tidal forces present in the collision.

If that's not strange enough, the underlying physics behind the "beads on a string" shape is related to describing the behavior of self-gravitating clumps of gas. It's analogous to the process where rain falls in drops rather than in continuous filaments from clouds. It's called the Jeans instability, and it can play out on distance scales of enormous orders of magnitude — from being inches across to many thousands of light-years in length.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Tremblay (European Southern Observatory) #nasagoddard #Hubble #space #pearls
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nasagoddard Hubble Sees a Galaxy With a Glowing Heart -- This view, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a nearby spiral galaxy known as NGC 1433. At about 32 million light-years from Earth, it is a type of very active galaxy known as a Seyfert galaxy — a classification that accounts for 10% of all galaxies. They have very bright, luminous centers that are comparable in brightness to that of our entire galaxy, the Milky Way.

Galaxy cores are of great interest to astronomers. The centers of most, if not all, galaxies are thought to contain a supermassive black hole, surrounded by a disk of in-falling material.

NGC 1433 is being studied as part of a survey of 50 nearby galaxies known as the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). Ultraviolet radiation is observed from galaxies, mainly tracing the most recently formed stars. In Seyfert galaxies, ultraviolet light is also thought to emanate from the accretion discs around their central black holes. Studying these galaxies in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum is incredibly useful to study how the gas is behaving near the black hole. This image was obtained using a mix of ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgements: D. Calzetti (UMass) and the LEGUS Team #nasagoddard #space #Hubble #heart #galaxy
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X-Pro II NASA Goddard
nasagoddard This summer, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar, or MABEL, will fly above Alaska and the Arctic Ocean on one of NASA’s ER-2 high-altitude aircraft.

Between July 12 and August 1, MABEL will fly aboard NASA’s high-altitude ER-2 aircraft as the Arctic sea ice and glaciers are melting. In its half-dozen flights, the instrument will take measurements of the sea ice and Alaska’s southern glaciers, as well as forests, lakes, open ocean, the atmosphere and more, sending data back to researchers on the ground.

Credit: NASA/Carla Thomas #nasagoddard #NASAinAlaska
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nasagoddard Two active regions with their intense magnetic fields produced towering arches and spiraling coils of solar loops above them (June 29 - July 1, 2014) as they rotated into view. When viewed in extreme ultraviolet light, magnetic field lines are revealed by charged particles that travel along them. These active regions appear as dark sunspots when viewed in filtered light. Note the small blast in the upper of the two major active regions, followed by more coils of loops as the region reorganizes itself. The still was taken on June 30 at 10:33 UT.

Credit: NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory #nasagoddard #sun #space
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