nasagoddard This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a planetary nebula named NGC 6153, located about 4,000 light-years away in the southern constellation of Scorpius (The Scorpion). The faint blue haze across the frame shows what remains of a star like the sun after it has depleted most of its fuel. When this happens, the outer layers of the star are ejected, and get excited and ionized by the energetic ultraviolet light emitted by the bright hot core of the star, forming the nebula.

NGC 6153 is a planetary nebula that is elliptical in shape, with an extremely rich network of loops and filaments, shown clearly in this Hubble image. However, this is not what makes this planetary nebula so interesting for astronomers.

Measurements show that NGC 6153 contains large amounts of neon, argon, oxygen, carbon and chlorine — up to three times more than can be found in the solar system. The nebula contains a whopping five times more nitrogen than our sun! Although it may be that the star developed higher levels of these elements as it grew and evolved, it is more likely that the star originally formed from a cloud of material that already contained a lot more of these elements.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Matej Novak #nasagoddard #Hubble #nebula #space
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nasagoddard Student experimenters successfully launch suborbital rocket from NASA Wallops

NASA successfully launched a NASA Terrier-Improved Orion suborbital sounding rocket carrying student experiments with the RockOn/RockSat-C programs at 6 a.m., today.

More than 200 middle school and university students and instructors participating in Rocket Week at Wallops were on hand to witness the launch.

Through RockOn and RockSat-C students are learning and applying skills required to develop experiments for suborbital rocket flight. In addition, middle school educators through the Wallops Rocket Academy for Teachers (WRATS) are learning about applying rocketry basics in their curriculum.

The payload flew to an altitude of 71.4 miles and descended by parachute into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Wallops. Payload recovery is in progress.

Credits: NASA Wallops Optics Lab #nasagoddard #rocket #space #
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nasagoddard Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have discovered an immense cloud of hydrogen dubbed “The Behemoth” bleeding from a planet orbiting a nearby star. The enormous, comet-like feature is about 50 times the size of the parent star. The hydrogen is evaporating from a warm, Neptune-sized planet, due to extreme radiation from the star.

This phenomenon has never been seen around an exoplanet so small. It may offer clues to how other planets with hydrogen-enveloped atmospheres could have their outer layers evaporated by their parent star, leaving behind solid, rocky cores. Hot, rocky planets such as these that roughly the size of Earth are known as Hot-Super Earths. “This cloud is very spectacular, though the evaporation rate does not threaten the planet right now,” explains the study’s leader, David Ehrenreich of the Observatory of the University of Geneva in Switzerland. “But we know that in the past, the star, which is a faint red dwarf, was more active. This means that the planet evaporated faster during its first billion years of existence because of the strong radiation from the young star. Overall, we estimate that it may have lost up to 10 percent of its atmosphere over the past several billion years.” Credits: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI) #nasagoddard #Hubble #space #planet #star
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nasagoddard Moon Engulfed in Permanent, Lopsided, Dust Cloud

New science results from NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer, or LADEE, mission indicate that the moon is engulfed in a permanent, but lopsided, dust cloud that increases in density when annual events like the Geminids meteor shower spew shooting stars, according to a new study led by University of Colorado Boulder.

This image shows an artist's conception of the lunar dust exosphere surrounding the moon. The color represents the amount of material ejected from the surface, showing a peak in the apex direction. A haze of dust is shown around the moon. Gray faded circles are overlaid on the lunar surface to represent the random nature of the primary impactors. An artist's conception of the LADEE spacecraft's trajectory is also shown.

Credits: University of Colorado Boulder/Daniel Morgan/Jamey Szalay #moon
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nasagoddard Mid June in the North Atlantic

Phytoplankton communities and sea ice limn the turbulent flow field around Iceland in this Suomi-NPP/VIIRS scene collected on June 14, 2015.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Suomin NPP/VIIRS #nasagoddard #Iceland #earth
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nasagoddard Lonely Galaxy Lost in Space

Most galaxies are clumped together in groups or clusters. A neighboring galaxy is never far away. But this galaxy, known as NGC 6503, has found itself in a lonely position, at the edge of a strangely empty patch of space called the Local Void.

The Local Void is a huge stretch of space that is at least 150 million light-years across. It seems completely empty of stars or galaxies. The galaxy’s odd location on the edge of this never-land led stargazer Stephen James O’Meara to dub it the “Lost-In-Space galaxy” in his 2007 book, Hidden Treasures.

NGC 6503 is 18 million light-years away from us in the northern circumpolar constellation of Draco. NGC 6503 spans some 30,000 light-years, about a third of the size of the Milky Way.

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows NGC 6503 in striking detail and with a rich set of colors. Bright red patches of gas can be seen scattered through its swirling spiral arms, mixed with bright blue regions that contain newly forming stars. Dark brown dust lanes snake across the galaxy’s bright arms and center, giving it a mottled appearance.

Photo Credit: NASA, ESA, D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts), H. Ford (Johns Hopkins University), and the Hubble Heritage Team #nasagoddard #Hubble #space #LostinSpace
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nasagoddard Low pressure system off Ireland

In early June, 2015 a strong low pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean brought rain and gusty winds to Ireland and the United Kingdom. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of the spiraling system on June 5.

A very deep low pressure area lies in the center of the spiral, just off the northwestern shore of emerald-green Ireland. Bands of cloud, containing rain and thunderstorms, swirl into the center of the low, and extend over the British Isles. A low pressure system will pull in air from the surrounding area, creating spiraling winds. Winds around the center of a low pressure spiral counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, as we see here (clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere) and towards the center of the system. Although the system was impressive on June 5, it intensified over the next several days. According to MarkVoganWeather.com, by June 7 the pressure in the unusually deep Atlantic low, which had been hanging around 980mb, was expected to drop lower to about 978mb off of Anglesey, brining northwest gales along the Atlantic west and south coasts of Ireland, England and Wales. Winds gust of up to 80 mph were possible, along with heavy rains.

Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC #nasagoddard
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nasagoddard Ship-wave-shaped wave clouds induced by Kuril Islands

The Kuril Islands are a string of volcanically-formed islands that stretch between Russia and Japan, separating the North Pacific Ocean from the Sea of Okhotsk. Subject to the cold, moist breezes from the North Atlantic, and the frigid air from Siberia, the climate is severe, with frequent storms, and ever-present winds, which often reach hurricane strength. Cloudy, windy conditions are common.

On June 1, 2015 the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image as it passed over the Kuril Islands.
Clouds curl into the center of a storm system, bringing strong winds to the region. As the winds scrape over the tall volcanic peaks of the Kuril Islands, they become turbulent air behind the islands. The turbulence disturbs the cloudbank, etching its passage into a striking pattern that can be seen from space.

This particular pattern is called “ship-waved-shaped wave clouds”, because the pattern can be likened to that formed behind a ship cutting through a smooth ocean. On the windward side of the Kuril Islands, the cloud bank is generally smooth, with streaks that are lined up parallel to the movement of the wind, blowing from the west and towards the east. Behind the tall volcanic peaks of the islands, V’s fan out on the leeward side, illustrating the flow of the turbulent air.

Image Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC #nasagoddard
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X-Pro II NASA Goddard
nasagoddard Four silver-colored James Webb Space Telescope primary segments. The primary mirror segments were cryogenically tested at NASA Marshall both before and after they were coated with gold. The gold coating optimizes them for reflecting infrared light. The mirror segments are actually made of beryllium, and polished to a precise prescription.

Credit: NASA #nasagoddard #JWST #space
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nasagoddard NASA & @RIS4E_SSERVI scientists in #Hawaii practicing how to do science on extreme worlds - like #Mars. #NASA 4w

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nasagoddard Destined for space flight - what spacecraft will I fly with? Maybe @NASA_ICESat2? #ThermalBlanket #KeepingCool 4w

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nasagoddard No, this not a huge tumbling potato in outer space.
Hubble Finds Two Chaotically Tumbling Pluto Moons -- This computer animation illustrates how Pluto's moon Nix changes its spin unpredictably as it orbits the "double planet" Pluto-Charon. The view is from the surface of Pluto as the moon circles the Pluto-Charon system. The full length version of this time-lapse view of the moon, compressing four years of motion into two minutes, with one complete orbit of Pluto-Charon every two seconds. This video is only about 15 seconds and so represents a shorter period of time. (The apparent star movement rate is greatly slowed down for illustration purposes.) The animation is based on dynamical models of spinning bodies in complex gravitational fields — like the field produced by Pluto and Charon's motion about each other. Astronomers used this simulation to try to understand the unpredictable changes in reflected light from Nix as it orbits Pluto-Charon. They also found that Pluto's moon Hydra also undergoes chaotic spin. The football shape of both moons contributes to their wild motion. The consequences are that if you lived on either moon, you could not predict the time or direction the sun would rise the next morning. (The moon is too small for Hubble to resolve surface features, and so the surface textures used here are purely for illustration purposes.) Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Showalter (SETI Institute), and G. Bacon (STScI) #nasagoddard #hubble
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nasagoddard Scientists have detected a trend in the Western Pacific — annual rainfall has been increasing since the late 1990s. A new NASA study offers some insight into why this might be happening: Large thunderstorms are organizing in the atmosphere more frequently than in the past, bringing more total rain. #EarthRightNow

To learn more, visit: http://1.usa.gov/1JoydC2 #nasagoddard #earth
4w
  •   jessicayvette @mooseman1914 look babe! 4w
  •   anthony.t.nixon We needed a study to tell us that it is raining more because we have more storms? 4w
  •   jewishlewis @anthony.t.nixon @scotty_fusion wow good points bros. Because that's clearly what NASA is saying in this post. You two should like, team up and be the Weather Dynamics Duo 4w
  •   ny3t So more rains on the ocean compared to land on the west conus? 4w
  •   huntington3rd We have more rain because our weakening solar wind isn't forcing away the galactic winds flowing in from outside our solar system. The galactic winds have a high concentration of hydrogen atoms that combine with oxygen atoms leeching from earths atmosphere... Instant H2O!! Our water didn't come from comets or asteroids 3w
  •   kuestdaoriginal @lizzz.ceee coverup 3w

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nasagoddard Situated between the Black Sea and the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara is full of a rich soup of nutrients and life and surrounded by a rich history of civilization. Like the Black Sea to its northeast, the Marmara has an unusual layered structure with fresher water near the surface and much saltier water near the bottom. That fresh surface is fed by exchanges with the Black Sea and by flows from the Susurluk, Biga, and Gonen Rivers. The fresh water (just two thirds the salinity of the ocean) makes it easier for floating, plant-like organisms—phytoplankton—to grow, as does the abundance of nutrients pouring into the seas from European and Turkish rivers.

The Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of a phytoplankton bloom in the Sea of Marmara on May 17, 2015. The sea is surrounded on all sides by the nation of Turkey. The swirling shapes on the water are phytoplankton, with the yellow-green and red-purple filaments likely (but not necessarily) representing different species.

Those wavy colored lines not only show where the densest concentrations of plankton are floating, but also reveal the eddies and currents within the small sea. Waters rushing in through the narrow Bosphorous Strait (at Istanbul) and Dardanelles Strait (off the left side of the image), as well as a jagged coastline and tectonically fractured seafloor on this edge of the Asian and European continents, all conspire to create intricate mixing patterns. If you download the large image and open it in full resolution, you also can see ship tracks crossing the bloom lines.

NASA image by Josh Stevens (Earth Observatory) and Norman Kuring (NASA Ocean Color group) using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Mike Carlowicz. #nasagoddard #earth
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nasagoddard Hubble Peers into the Most Crowded Place in the Milky Way

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way. It is located about 25,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), close to the heart of our galaxy, the Milky Way. It is, like its neighbor the Quintuplet Cluster, a fairly young astronomical object at between two and four million years old.

The Arches cluster is so dense that in a region with a radius equal to the distance between the sun and its nearest star there would be over 100,000 stars! At least 150 stars within the cluster are among the brightest ever discovered in the Milky Way. These stars are so bright and massive that they will burn their fuel within a short time (on a cosmological scale that means just a few million years). Then they will die in spectacular supernova explosions. Due to the short lifetime of the stars in the cluster the gas between the stars contains an unusually high amount of heavier elements, which were produced by earlier generations of stars.

Despite its brightness the Arches Cluster cannot be seen with the naked eye. The visible light from the cluster is completely obscured by gigantic clouds of dust in this region. To make the cluster visible astronomers have to use detectors which can collect light from the X-ray, infrared, and radio bands, as these wavelengths can pass through the dust clouds. This observation shows the Arches Cluster in the infrared and demonstrates the leap in Hubble’s performance since its 1999 image of same object.

Credit: NASA/ESA #nasagoddard #Hubble #MilkyWay
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nasagoddard Merging galaxies break radio silence.

A team of astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope found an unambiguous link between the presence of supermassive black holes that power high-speed, radio-signal-emitting jets and the merger history of their host galaxies. Almost all galaxies with the jets were found to be merging with another galaxy, or to have done so recently.

Credit: NASA/ESA/STScI #nasagoddard #Hubble #space #BlackHole #galaxy
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nasagoddard The fully-integrated GOES-R satellite is shown in a clean room at a Lockheed Martin facility in Littleton, Colorado. The GOES-R satellite recently completed its pre-environmental review and is ready for the environmental testing phase. Environmental testing is intended to simulate the harsh conditions of launch and the space environment once the satellite is in orbit. The GOES-R satellite and its instruments will undergo a variety of rigorous tests which include vibration, acoustics, and subjecting the satellite to extreme thermal temperatures in a vacuum chamber.

Credit: Lockheed Martin #nasagoddard
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nasagoddard Technicians work with the secondary mirror of the James Webb Space Telescope in a clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Credits: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn #nasagoddard #JWST #Webb
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nasagoddard Hubble Spots the Layers of NGC 3923

The glowing object in this Hubble Space Telescope image is an elliptical galaxy called NGC 3923. It is located over 90 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra.

NGC 3923 is an example of a shell galaxy where the stars in its halo are arranged in layers.

Finding concentric shells of stars enclosing a galaxy is quite common and is observed in many elliptical galaxies. In fact, every tenth elliptical galaxy exhibits this onion-like structure, which has never been observed in spiral galaxies. The shell-like structures are thought to develop as a consequence of galactic cannibalism, when a larger galaxy ingests a smaller companion. As the two centers approach, they initially oscillate about a common center, and this oscillation ripples outwards forming the shells of stars just as ripples on a pond spread when the surface is disturbed.

NGC 3923 has over twenty shells, with only a few of the outer ones visible in this image, and its shells are much more subtle than those of other shell galaxies. The shells of this galaxy are also interestingly symmetrical, while other shell galaxies are more skewed.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasagoddard #space #Hubble #galaxy
2mon
  •   rugix95 Accept alien plzzz nasa :-) alien want communicate with you 1mon
  •   rugix95 Its the the time nasaaa ! Fourth dimension and five is for now time to evolve 1mon
  •   rugix95 You can believe me alien is good we need it shield must exist 1mon
  •   rugix95 Alien existttt !!! 1mon
  •   immoutlaw 1 word Dark Energy explains me 1mon
  •   amzov @m.amzov 1mon
  •   ebtisamalgam @rugix95 you really do have an alien look! They should send you to space immediately! 1w

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nasagoddard Hubble Catches Stellar Exodus in Action

Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have captured for the first time snapshots of fledging white dwarf stars beginning their slow-paced, 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster to the less populated suburbs.

White dwarfs are the burned-out relics of stars that rapidly lose mass, cool down and shut off their nuclear furnaces. As these glowing carcasses age and shed weight, their orbits begin to expand outward from the star cluster’s packed downtown. This migration is caused by a gravitational tussle among stars inside the cluster. Globular star clusters sort out stars according to their mass, governed by a gravitational billiard ball game where lower mass stars rob momentum from more massive stars. The result is that heavier stars slow down and sink to the cluster's core, while lighter stars pick up speed and move across the cluster to the edge. This process is known as "mass segregation." Until these Hubble observations, astronomers had never definitively seen the dynamical conveyor belt in action.

Astronomers used Hubble to watch the white-dwarf exodus in the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense swarm of hundreds of thousands of stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The cluster resides 16,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Tucana.

Credits: NASA, ESA, and H. Richer and J. Heyl (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada); acknowledgement: J. Mack (STScI) and G. Piotto (University of Padova, Italy) #nasagoddard #space #Hubble
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