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nasagoddard For all those people who have ever said, “I bet you can see my neighbor’s Christmas lights from space!” well, we now have proof that they’re right — at least in aggregate. For the first time, NASA researchers have measured the increase in Earth’s night lights during both the holiday period between Thanksgiving and New Years, in the U.S., and for the holy month of Ramadan in the Middle East.

While we may not be able to see individual front yards, the satellite data has such good resolution that researchers from Yale University have been able to find correlations between political and socio-economic data for individual neighborhoods and the brightness measured from space. Researchers say being able to monitor our lighting output in this way is like being able to measure traffic on a highway, rather than just map the road itself.

If we can understand the behavioral aspect of lights and energy use throughout the year it can shed light on our understanding of energy efficiency and human drivers of climate change.

Read more: http://bit.ly/NASAHolidayLights

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

#AGU14 #Landsat #NASA #nasagoddard #space
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X-Pro II NASA Goddard
nasagoddard A C-130 was delivered to NASA Wallops in support of NASA's Airborne Science Program. The aircraft came from the United States Coast Guard. Dubbed NASA 436, the aircraft will support the Atmospheric Carbon Transport - America project in the fall 2015.

Credit: NASA
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nasagoddard NASA satellite instruments have observed a marked increase in solar radiation absorbed in the Arctic since the year 2000—a trend that aligns with the steady decrease in Arctic sea ice during the same period.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1wG5fGe

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center #nasagoddard
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nasagoddard The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 11:50 p.m. EST on Dec. 16, 2014. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

This flare is classified as an M8.7-class flare. M-class flares are a tenth the size of the most intense flares, the X-class flares. The number provides more information about its strength. An M2 is twice as intense as an M1, an M3 is three times as intense, etc.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO #sun #earth #nasagoddard #flare
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nasagoddard The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 11:50 p.m. EST on Dec. 16, 2014. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

This flare is classified as an M8.7-class flare. M-class flares are a tenth the size of the most intense flares, the X-class flares. The number provides more information about its strength. An M2 is twice as intense as an M1, an M3 is three times as intense, etc.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO #sun #earth #nasagoddard #flare
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nasagoddard City lights shine brighter during the holidays in the United States when compared with the rest of the year, as shown using a new analysis of daily data from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite. Dark green pixels are areas where lights are 50 percent brighter, or more, during December.
Credit: Jesse Allen, NASA’s Earth Observatory

Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/satellite-sees-holiday-lights-brighten-cities

#nasagoddard #earth #christmaslights #holidaylights #unitedstates #usa
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nasagoddard City lights shine brighter during the holidays in the United States when compared with the rest of the year, as shown using a new analysis of daily data from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite. Dark green pixels are areas where lights are 50 percent brighter, or more, during December.
Credit: Jesse Allen, NASA’s Earth Observatory

Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/satellite-sees-holiday-lights-brighten-cities

#nasagoddard #earth #christmaslights #holidaylights #unitedstates #usa
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nasagoddard 12.13.14

NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this stunning view of the Americas on 12.13.14, December 13, 2014 at 17:45 UTC. The data from GOES-East was made into an image by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. Geostationary describes an orbit in which a satellite is always in the same position with respect to the rotating Earth. This allows GOES to hover continuously over one position on Earth's surface, appearing stationary. As a result, GOES provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric "triggers" for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes.

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project #nasagoddard #earth #earthrightnow #space #121314
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nasagoddard A Hubble View of All That Glitters

This striking NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a glittering bauble named Messier 92. Located in the northern constellation of Hercules, this globular cluster — a ball of stars that orbits a galactic core like a satellite — was first discovered by astronomer Johann Elert Bode in 1777.

Messier 92 is one of the brightest globular clusters in the Milky Way, and is visible to the naked eye under good observing conditions. It is very tightly packed with stars, containing some 330,000 stars in total. As is characteristic of globular clusters, the predominant elements within Messier 92 are hydrogen and helium, with only traces of others. It is actually what is known as an Oosterhoff type II (OoII) globular cluster, meaning that it belongs to a group of metal-poor clusters — to astronomers, metals are all elements heavier than hydrogen and helium.

By exploring the composition of globulars like Messier 92, astronomers can figure out the age of these clusters. As well as being bright, Messier 92 is also old, being one of the oldest star clusters in the Milky Way, with an age almost the same as the age of the Universe.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Gilles Chapdelaine #nasagoddard #space #Hubble
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nasagoddard Strong Pacific Storm System Affecting West Coast
This image was taken by the GOES West satellite on December 10, 2014. This strong Pacific storm system was forecast to bring some drought relief to California and Oregon through December 10, 2014. An atmospheric river of moisture, or pineapple express, was expected ahead of this system, tapping moisture from the tropics. This led to a swath of heavy rainfall, along with snow in the highest mountains of the Sierra Nevada and the northern California mountains.

The GOES series of satellites keep an eye on the weather happening over the continental U.S. and eastern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., procures and manages the development and launch of the GOES series of satellites for NOAA and creates images and animations. The GOES satellites are operated by NOAA.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project

#nasaoddard #weather #rain #bayareastorm #stormageddon
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nasagoddard Cassini’s view of Jupiter’s southern hemisphere

This Cassini image shows Jupiter from an unusual perspective. If you were to float just beneath the giant planet and look directly up, you would be greeted with this striking sight: red, bronze and white bands encircling a hazy south pole. The multicoloured concentric layers are broken in places by prominent weather systems such as Jupiter’s famous Great Red Spot, visible towards the upper left, chaotic patches of cloud and pale white dots. Many of these lighter patches contain lightning-filled thunderstorms.

Jupiter has very dramatic weather – the planet’s axis is not as tilted (towards or away from the Sun) as much as Earth’s so it does not have significant seasonal changes, but it does have a thick and tumultuous atmosphere filled with raging storms and chaotic cloud systems.

These clouds, formed from dense layers of ammonia crystals, are tugged, stretched and tangled together by Jupiter’s turbulence and strong winds, creating vortices and hurricane-like storms with wind speeds of up to 360 km per hour.

The Great Red Spot is actually an anticyclone that has been violently churning for hundreds of years. It was at one stage large enough to contain several Earth-sized planets but recent images from the Hubble Space Telescope show it to be shrinking. There are other similarly striking storms raging in both Jupiter’s cool upper atmosphere and hotter lower layers, including a Great Dark Spot and Oval BA, more affectionately nicknamed Red Spot Jr.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1vFwQCt

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute #space #Jupiter
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nasagoddard A gentle landing for a mighty rocket!

Navy Divers, attach a towing bridal to the #Orion Crew Module during the first Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1) NASA Orion Program. USS Anchorage is currently conducting the first exploration test flight for the NASA Orion Program. EFT-1 is the fifth at sea testing of the Orion Crew Module using a Navy well deck recovery method.
Credit: U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Corey Green
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nasagoddard A Delta IV Heavy #rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying NASA's #Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system.

The spacecraft splashed down in the Pacific Ocean approximately 600 southwest of San Diego. The recovery team from NASA, the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin will perform initial recovery operations, including safing the crew module and towing it into the well deck of the USS Anchorage, a landing platform-dock ship.

Credit: NASA
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  •   jessy1011 @xx.isabel 1w
  •   kylesloup @chrisjwasher If this doesn't turn you on I don't know what will 5d
  •   chuckcloninger I happened to be driving past Cape Kennedy one time when, to my surprise, a missile takeoff was planned. I pulled over to see why everyone else was pulled over (I didn't even know where I was) and I soon felt the ground begin to move and a rumble filled the air. It got louder and louder and I then saw the smoke and then the fire and then the missile lifting off. A huge bit of pride filled me and I was proud to be part of a nation that could do that. 5d
  •   jenr231993 :3 ohh que bacano!!! 3d
  •   lisbcastro Brutal parece que va lento y seguro va rapidísimo @annlamberti 2d

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nasagoddard Go #Orion!

The United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket with NASA’s Orion spacecraft mounted atop, lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 37 at at 7:05 a.m. EST, Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Florida. The Orion spacecraft will orbit Earth twice, reaching an altitude of approximately 3,600 miles above Earth before landing in the Pacific Ocean. No one is aboard Orion for this flight test, but the spacecraft is designed to allow us to journey to destinations never before visited by humans, including an asteroid and Mars.
Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
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X-Pro II NASA Goddard
nasagoddard NASA’s Operation IceBridge completed four more surveys of the Antarctic, bringing the mission’s six-week-long field campaign to a close.

On Nov. 15, IceBridge carried out a newly-created mission designed to study the Institute Ice Stream near the Ronne Ice Shelf. On this flight researchers collected data on surface elevation, sub-ice bedrock and water depth along paths previously measured by NASA’s Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite, or ICESat, from 2003 to 2009. This region has been the subject of ground-based studies going back to the 1950s, airborne research by a joint U.S.–Danish project in the 1970s and an effort by Germany’s Alfred Wegener Institute in the 1990s.

Pictured above is NASA's DC-8 is seen over clouds shortly after taking off from Punta Arenas for the second science flight of the campaign.
Credit: Craig McMahon/Sander Geophysics Ltd.
NASA's Operation IceBridge is an airborne science mission to study Earth's polar ice. For more information about IceBridge, visit: www.nasa.gov/icebridge

#nasagoddard
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nasagoddard Caption: The interactions between clouds and aerosols are illustrated in this image, taken by retired astronaut Chris Hadfield onboard the International Space Station. It shows contrails produced by aircraft (bright streaks) over the ocean. --
Turn on any local TV weather forecast and you can get a map of where skies are blue or cloudy. But for scientists trying to figure out how clouds affect the Earth’s environment, what's happening inside that shifting cloud cover is critical and hard to see.

To investigate the layers and composition of clouds and tiny airborne particles like dust, smoke and other atmospheric aerosols, , scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland have developed an instrument called the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System, or CATS. The instrument, which launches to the International Space Station in December 2014, will explore new technologies that could also be used in future satellite missions.

From space, streaks of white clouds can be seen moving across Earth’s surface. Other tiny solid and liquid particles called aerosols are also being transported around the atmosphere, but these are largely invisible to our eyes. Aerosols are both natural and man-made, and include windblown desert dust, sea salt, smoke from fires, sulfurous particles from volcanic eruptions, and particles from fossil fuel combustion.
Credit: NASA/Chris Hadfield
Read more: http://bit.ly/NASACats
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nasagoddard Ash plulme from Shiveluch, Kamchatka Peninsula, eastern Russia

On November 23, 2014 the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite flew over Russia’s Kamchatka’s Peninsula and captured this true-color image of a large volcanic plume pouring from Shiveluch Volcano. A strong vulcanian explosion at the volcano same day, with the ash plume rising approximately 8 km (5 mi) above the caldera. Although no lava flow has been reported, the plume extended for more than 200 km (124 mi). Shiveluch (also spelled Sheveluch) is one of the largest and most active volcanoes on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. It has been spewing ash and steam intermittently—with occasional dome collapses, pyroclastic flows, and lava flows, as well—for the past decade.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team #nasagoddard
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nasagoddard First #snow of the season here at NASA Goddard in Greenbelt, Md.
The Goddard geese seem to like it!

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum
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nasagoddard This slightly warped dwarf galaxy is a sweet spectacle!

The galaxy cutting dramatically across the frame of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a slightly warped dwarf galaxy known as UGC1281. Seen here from an edge-on perspective, this galaxy lies roughly 18 million light-years away in the constellation of Triangulum (The Triangle). The bright companion to the lower left of UGC 1281 is the small galaxy PGC 6700, officially known as 2MASX J01493473+3234464. Other prominent stars belonging to our own galaxy, the Milky Way, and more distant galaxies can be seen scattered throughout the sky.
The side-on view we have of UGC 1281 makes it a perfect candidate for studies into how gas is distributed within galactic halos — the roughly spherical regions of diffuse gas extending outwards from a galaxy’s center. Astronomers have studied this galaxy to see how its gas vertically extends out from its central plane, and found it to be a quite typical dwarf galaxy. However, it does have a slightly warped shape to its outer edges, and is forming stars at a particularly low rate.

Credit: ESA/NASA, Acknowledgement Luca Limatola #nasagoddard #Hubble #space #galaxy
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nasagoddard Scientists Study the Interaction of the Solar Wind and Earth’s Atmosphere From Norway

A four-stage NASA Black Brant XII suborbital sounding rocket carrying the Cusp-Region Experiment (C-REX) payload was successfully launch at 3:05 a.m. EST, Nov. 24, 2014, from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway. Preliminary data shows that all 24 sub-payloads ejected as planned as the rocket flew to nearly 302 miles altitude. The science team is analyzing the data, including that gathered from ground cameras and cameras in the NASA B200 aircraft of the vapor cloud releases.

Credit: NASA/Brea Reeves #nasagoddard #rocket
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