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nasagoddard NASA Goddard GPM "Signs of Spring" Photo Contest!! As GPM watches spring weather from above, we want to see what spring looks like to you! Get out your cameras and show us the signs of spring in your area - from April showers to dew-drops on flowers. Show us how precipitation influences spring in your area.

Post your coolest photos of the signs of spring, and we’ll choose the best ones to post on the NASA website.

While we welcome images of extreme weather, we don't want YOU to be too extreme. So before you take that photo, please make sure you're keeping safe.

The submission period is from 3/30/15 - 4/27/15. You must use #GPMSpring and #NASAGoddard on your photos.

You can also upload your photos to Flickr. Submit your photos to the GPM Extreme Weather Flickr group here: http://www.flickr.com/groups/gpm-extreme-weather/

Please provide as much information with the submission as you are comfortable providing:

Your name, affiliation (e.g. school, community group, etc.), location where photo was taken (country, city, state, latitude, longitude), and any other interesting details about the photo and how it was taken.

Please limit your posts to 10 submissions per person.

Read all the details at: http://bit.ly/GPMSpringPhoto #GPMSpring #nasagoddard #contest #photocontest
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nasagoddard NASA’s Hubble, Chandra Find Clues that May Help Identify Dark Matter — Using observations from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have found that dark matter does not slow down when colliding with itself, meaning it interacts with itself less than previously thought. Researchers say this finding narrows down the options for what this mysterious substance might be.

Dark matter is an invisible matter that makes up most of the mass of the universe. Because dark matter does not reflect, absorb or emit light, it can only be traced indirectly by, such as by measuring how it warps space through gravitational lensing, during which the light from a distant source is magnified and distorted by the gravity of dark matter.

Caption: Here are images of six different galaxy clusters taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (blue) and Chandra X-ray Observatory (pink) in a study of how dark matter in clusters of galaxies behaves when the clusters collide. A total of 72 large cluster collisions were studied. Credit: NASA and ESA

#nasagoddard #hubble #hst space #darkmatter
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nasagoddard Cyclone Nathan in the Coral Sea

Tropical Cyclone Nathan has spent the past week slowly circling the Coral Sea east of the Great Barrier Reef off the eastern coast of #Queensland, #Australia. The Reef can be seen in this image as the light blue ribbon of reefs, islands and cays parallel to the Queensland coast. Now the Joint #Typhoon Warning Center predicts a westward track, with the storm strengthening to category 4 intensity. Landfall is forecast around 5:00 am local time between Cape Flattery and Cooktown still at category 4 strength with increased forward speed. This image was taken by the Suomi NPP satellite's VIIRS instrument around 0340Z on March 18, 2015.

Credit: NASA/NOAA/Suomi NPP/VIIRS #nasagoddard #weather #cyclone
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nasagoddard Ziggy and the Eclipse

During the morning of March 20, 2015, a total solar eclipse was visible from parts of Europe, and a partial solar eclipse from northern Africa and northern Asia.
At about 09:25, Cetra Coverdale of Derbyshire, England went outside to view the eclipse. Soon after seeing the eclipse Cetra noticed Ziggy, the cat, had gotten up on the roof of the car to see what was going on. At that point Cetra said "…and I couldn't resist including him in the shot." Well, we are glad you did! What a great image! Thank you, Cetra for sharing your image with us!

Credit: Cetra Coverdale #nasagoddard #eclipse #sun #moon #England #Derbyshire #cat
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nasagoddard During the morning of March 20, 2015, a total solar eclipse was visible from parts of Europe, and a partial solar eclipse from northern Africa and northern Asia. NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Arctic Ocean on March 20 at 10:45 UTC (6:45 a.m. EDT) and captured the eclipse's shadow over the clouds in the Arctic Ocean.

Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team #nasagoddard #eclipse #solareclipse #sun #earth #moon
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nasagoddard Arctic Sea Ice Sets New Record Winter Low

The sea ice cap of the Arctic appeared to reach its annual maximum winter extent on February 25, according to data from the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado, Boulder. At 5.61 million square miles (14.54 million square kilometers), this year’s maximum extent was the smallest on the satellite record and also one of the earliest.

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center #nasagoddard #arctic #weather #winter #snow #ice
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nasagoddard BaBam!
How about a little something green for St. Patrick's Day? "St. Patrick's Aurora" was taken at Donnelly Creek, Alaska at 1:30 am, March 17, 2015 by our good friend Sebastian Saarloos!

You can see more images from Sebastian at facebook.com/SebastianSaarloos

Credit: Sebastian Saarloos #aurora #StPatricksDay #space #science #nasagoddard #sky #alaska #HappyStPatricksDay
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nasagoddard In this view, looking towards Mercury's southern horizon, the rim of Rembrandt basin extends across the middle of the image. With a diameter of 716 kilometers (445 mi.), Rembrandt basin is one of the largest basins on Mercury. A variety of tectonic features are associated with the basin, including Enterprise Rupes, among the largest contractional landforms on the planet.

This image was acquired as part of MDIS's limb imaging campaign. Once per week, MDIS captures images of Mercury's limb, with an emphasis on imaging the southern hemisphere limb. These limb images provide information about Mercury's shape and complement measurements of topography made by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) of Mercury's northern hemisphere.

The MESSENGER spacecraft is the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury, and the spacecraft's seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation are unraveling the history and evolution of the Solar System's innermost planet. In the mission's more than three years of orbital operations, MESSENGER has acquired over 250,000 images and extensive other data sets. MESSENGER is capable of continuing orbital operations until early 2015.

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington #nasagoddard #planet #space #mercury
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nasagoddard The galaxy UGC 8201, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is a dwarf irregular galaxy, so called because of its small size and chaotic structure. It lies just under 15 million light-years away from us in the constellation of Draco (the Dragon). As with most dwarf galaxies it is a member of a larger group of galaxies. In this case UCG 8201 is part of the M81 galaxy group; this group is one of the closest neighbors to the Local Group of galaxies, which contains our galaxy, the Milky Way.

UGC 8201 is at an important phase in its evolution. It has recently finished a long period of star formation, which had significant impact on the whole galaxy. This episode lasted for several hundred million years and produced a high number of newborn bright stars. These stars can be seen in this image as the dominating light source within the galaxy. This process also changed the distribution and amount of dust and gas in between the stars in the galaxy.

Such large star formation events need extensive sources of energy to trigger them. However, compared to larger galaxies, dwarf galaxies lack such sources and they do not appear to have enough gas to produce as many new stars as they do. This raises an important unanswered question in galaxy evolution: How do relatively isolated, low-mass systems such as dwarf galaxies sustain star formation for extended periods of time?
Due to its relative proximity to Earth UGC 8201 is an excellent object for research and provides an opportunity to improve our understanding of how dwarf galaxies evolve and grow.

Credit: ESA/NASA #nasagoddard #hubble #space #galaxy
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nasagoddard Sun Emits an X2.2 Flare on March 11, 2015

The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 12:22 p.m. EDT on March 11, 2015. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

This flare is classified as an X2.2-class flare. X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength. An X2 is twice as intense as an X1, an X3 is three times as intense, etc.
This image was captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and shows a blend of light from the 171 and 131 Ångström wavelengths. The Earth is shown to scale.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO #nasagoddard #sun #cme #space
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nasagoddard The Sun blew out a coronal mass ejection along with part of a solar filament over a three-hour period (Feb. 24, 2015). While some of the strands fell back into the Sun, a substantial part raced into space in a bright cloud of particles (as observed by the SOHO spacecraft). The activity was captured in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Because this occurred way over near the edge of the Sun, it was unlikely to have any effect on Earth.
Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO #nasagoddard #sun #cme #space
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nasagoddard Iceland, dressed in winter white, peaked through a hole in a complex system of clouds in late February, 2015. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image on February 21 as it passed over the region.

Ice and snow covers Iceland almost entirely, except for coastal regions in the southwest and southeast. The extensive, roughly H-shaped area in the southeast section of the island is Vatnajökull, Iceland’s largest glacier. Hidden underneath the ice lies Bardarbunga, a large subglacial stratovolcano. On August 31, 2014 the volcano began an eruption at two fissures to the north of the glacier and deposited a lava field that measured about 131 feet (40 meters) at its thickest points, and covered an area about 33 sq. mi (85 sq. km) by the time the eruption ended on February 27, 2015. The massive lava flow left its mark on Iceland – the cooled lava can be seen as the roughly oval black area to the north of the Vatnajökull glacier.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team #nasagoddard #ice #iceland #snow #winter
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nasagoddard With its helical appearance resembling a snail’s shell, this reflection nebula seems to spiral out from a luminous central star in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image.

The star in the centre, known as V1331 Cyg and located in the dark cloud LDN 981 — or, more commonly, Lynds 981 — had previously been defined as a T Tauri star. A T Tauri is a young star — or Young Stellar Object — that is starting to contract to become a main sequence star similar to the Sun.

What makes V1331Cyg special is the fact that we look almost exactly at one of its poles. Usually, the view of a young star is obscured by the dust from the circumstellar disc and the envelope that surround it. However, with V1331Cyg we are actually looking in the exact direction of a jet driven by the star that is clearing the dust and giving us this magnificent view.

Credit:ESA/Hubble, NASA, Karl Stapelfeldt (GSFC), B. Stecklum and A. Choudhary (Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Germany) #nasagoddard #hubble #space #nebula #star
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nasagoddard Temperatures near freezing, snow and ice welcomed Goddard employees as they arrive at work today, Monday, March 2, 2015.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Bill Hrybyk #nasagoddard #weather #winter #snow #ice
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nasagoddard Temperatures near freezing, snow and ice welcomed Goddard employees as they arrive at work today, Monday, March 2, 2015.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Bill Hrybyk #nasagoddard #weather #winter #snow #ice
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nasagoddard RIP Leonard Nimoy. So many of us at NASA were inspired by Star Trek. Boldly go... High res: go.nasa.gov/10F4Ci0
Caption: In 1976, NASA's space shuttle Enterprise rolled out of the Palmdale manufacturing facilities and was greeted by NASA officials and cast members from the 'Star Trek' television series.

From left to right they are: NASA Administrator Dr. James D. Fletcher; DeForest Kelley, who portrayed Dr. "Bones" McCoy on the series; George Takei (Mr. Sulu); James Doohan (Chief Engineer Montgomery "Scotty" Scott); Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura); Leonard Nimoy (Mr. Spock); series creator Gene Rodenberry; an unnamed NASA official; and, Walter Koenig (Ensign Pavel Chekov). Image Credit: NASA #LLAP
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nasagoddard The galaxy pictured here is NGC 4424, located in the constellation of Virgo. It is not visible with the naked eye but has been captured here with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Although it may not be obvious from this image, NGC 4424 is in fact a spiral galaxy. In this image it is seen more or less edge on, but from above, you would be able to see the arms of the galaxy wrapping around its center to give the characteristic spiral form.

In 2012, astronomers observed a supernova in NGC 4424 — a violent explosion marking the end of a star’s life. During a supernova explosion, a single star can often outshine an entire galaxy. However, the supernova in NGC 4424, dubbed SN 2012cg, cannot be seen here as the image was taken ten years prior to the explosion. Along the central region of the galaxy, clouds of dust block the light from distant stars and create dark patches.

To the left of NGC 4424 there are two bright objects in the frame. The brightest is another, smaller galaxy known as LEDA 213994 and the object closer to NGC 4424 is an anonymous star in our Milky Way.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Gilles Chapdelaine #nasagoddard #space #Hubble
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nasagoddard Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall.

Like a lead violin tuning an orchestra, the GPM Core Observatory – launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency – acts as the standard to unify precipitation measurements from a network of 12 satellites. The result is NASA's Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM data product, called IMERG, which combines all of these data from 12 satellites into a single, seamless map.

This first IMERG data set spans the initial months of GPM data collection from April to September, 2014. The precipitation data collected covers the 87 percent of the globe that falls between 60 degrees north and 60 degrees south latitude, updated every half hour.

The map covers more of the globe than any previous NASA precipitation data set, allowing scientists to see how rain and snowstorms move around nearly the entire planet. As scientists work to understand all the elements of Earth’s climate and weather systems, and how they could change in the future, GPM provides a major step forward in providing the scientific community comprehensive and consistent measurements of precipitation.
Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
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nasagoddard NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility supported the successful launch of three Terrier-Oriole suborbital rockets for the Department of Defense between 2:30 and 2:31 a.m. today, Feb. 24, from NASA’s launch range on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

The next launch from the Wallops Flight Facility is a NASA Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital sounding rocket between 6 and 9 a.m. on March 27. The rocket will be carrying the Rocksat-X payload carrying university student developed experiments.
Credit: NASA/Alison Stancil #nasagoddard #rocket #launch
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nasagoddard What connects Earth's largest, hottest desert to its largest tropical rainforest?

The Sahara Desert is a near-uninterrupted brown band of sand and scrub across the northern third of Africa. The Amazon rainforest is a dense green mass of humid jungle that covers northeast South America. But after strong winds sweep across the Sahara, a tan cloud rises in the air, stretches between the continents, and ties together the desert and the jungle. It’s dust. And lots of it.

For the first time, a NASA satellite has quantified in three dimensions how much dust makes this trans-Atlantic journey. Scientists have not only measured the volume of dust, they have also calculated how much phosphorus – a natural plant fertilizer present in Saharan sands from part of the desert’s past as a lake bed – gets carried across the ocean from one of the planet’s most desolate places to one of its most fertile.

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center #nasagoddard
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