jaworskijason I had been driving around aimlessly for a few hours when the road ended at the beach. I got out of the car and walked toward the water. For some reason it was almost empty besides this one guy whose head I kept seeing bob up and down in the distance. In his twenties, he seemed to be celebrating something, throwing his arms up and cheering every now and then. Eventually, he came out of the water, saw me, and walked over. “Beach is empty today, well, almost,” and he pointed to the few dots of people further up and down the shore. I asked why. “Shark advisory, was spotted yesterday and again this morning.” We started going back and forth when he told me he had just gotten back from Iraq. “Every time I come back I go to the beach by myself and just run into the ocean and sit there. It’s calming, drowns out all the noise. Gets you thinking on everything, the kids I want to have, the girl I want to meet and all of that.” I ask him where his parents are. “Oh, they’re around, they didn’t want me to join the service which is probably the main reason why I did. Stupid, but that’s how it went. Never killed a man, but I came close. Got shot at too. It’s frightening to think how easy it is out there, that life is like a string, you can just cut or be cut at any moment. That’s what my counselor says. To think of it like a string. Right now though, I’m just enjoying the water. Cold, but better than nothing.” And with that he got up, walked toward the water, and stared out at the landless horizon in front of him, a mass of birds gliding down in the distance. I made this photograph while he stood there for what seemed to be over a minute. He turned to me after, smiled, and dove in. 2w

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jaworskijason I had just crossed the border into Mexico when I came upon a group of kids hanging over a guard railing at the bus station. Walking up to them, I waved hello and pointed to my camera, asking in Spanish if I could photograph them. All the kids, devastatingly shy as children often are, turned away from me. I smiled, put my camera away, and started to turn around when one of them spoke: "I've seen you before. You were here last week with your mom, waiting for her to buy meat." I laughed, saying that it was probably her. "I'm waiting for my mom too. She's coming home from Los Angeles." I tell him that that's where I live and we get into a small conversation. After awhile, he starts telling me about going to school in the U.S. and his mother. "She leaves every day at 4am and comes back late at night when I'm already in bed. I never wake up to the door opening, but sometimes I wake up to the smell of food. I know that she's home, but I pretend to sleep, hoping she'll come in my room. She doesn't do it all the time, but I like when she kisses my forehead and I can feel her hair on my face. It's warm. I don't know why I don't open my eyes and just say hi. Today she's coming home early though, it'll be the first time I see her in a month." I sit down next to him, continuing to listen. It's always humbling to come across someone who endures something you've never had to, no matter what their age. The other kids behind him are giggling and throwing little pieces of paper at each other from a straw they found on the floor. He reaches out for my camera. I take it off my shoulder and hand it to him. "Where do I see the pictures, there's no screen?" After explaining it to him, he seems baffled. "You should use a phone, it's much easier." I laugh and ask him his name while taking a photo. "I'm Aurelio," he says, "what's yours?" 🏽 3w

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jaworskijason March, 2011. I had just made my way up north from Fukushima to Miyako. She was alone when I found her. Hands wrapped with tape, sifting through a pile of debris that was once her house. After the initial awkwardness of two strangers meeting, I opened my bag, offering her some fresh water and food I had brought from Tokyo. She accepted gracefully, and after realizing I didn't speak Japanese, drew an image in the dirt to detail an object she was trying to find: a photo album. It took hours, but eventually we found it. Sitting down together, she wiped the dirt off the cover and opened the first page. Her eyes began to tear. She lifted her hand and extended her finger, pointing at and acknowledging every person in the book. “Mother- son- grandfather- cousin-“ On one of the last spreads she plucked out an old photograph. It was an image of a little boy. She wrote a note in Japanese on the back and handed it to me, closing my hands on its surface and pointing as if to say it was now mine. I tried to refuse but she wouldn’t have it. We continued to sift through the debris while she hummed an unfamiliar melody. Hours went by. After separating the dead fish from the piles she made, I looked up to see a small vehicle approaching us. She looked at me, bottom lip beginning to quiver. This is the last time I'll ever see her. We share a goodbye and I watch her board the vehicle. Finding a seat by a window, she turns to me- waving. I raise my hand to wave back and watched her figure shrink away as the car disappeared down the road. Two weeks later I'm on a plane headed back to LA. Staring out the window, I see a silent ocean. I close the shade, pulling out the photograph she had written her note on: “My house is gone, pushed by the ocean over a mile away. My family is gone, taken by the same water. Missing. I come here every day trying to find them. Meeting you gives me hope. You have blessed me. This photo is of my son. It's old, but if you see him, please tell him I'm still here and I haven't given up.” 3w

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jaworskijason I was wandering through a park in Mexico City. It had been raining all morning until the sky opened up to a deep denim blue. In the distance I saw a man seated on a stool with a tiny generator spitting out smoke, turning a wheel in front of him which he pressed different sized blades on. I approached him and asked in broken Spanish if I could photograph him. "Not a problem," he said in english. I laughed. “I used to live in New York, that’s where I learned to speak.” We get into a discussion of cities and I ask him how he likes Mexico City. "Where I live it’s calm and here in Chapultepec is always nice. Texas, though. I lived in El Paso for years doing this same type of job, and two things happen to me- murder and love.” I leaned in. “A lady used to come to me all the time, she had a restaurant and one day she shows up with large sunglasses and a big hat. I say, ‘where are you going?’ She gets shy, this woman who is always really proud. I look closer and see that everything on her face is covered up- bruises, cuts, a mess. I’m shocked- 'who did this to you,' I say. It takes awhile but she tells me it’s her novio. Some policeman. I shake my head. What can you do? So every week she comes to me, more bruises and I can’t take it. I tell her she has to tell someone or I will. She stops coming. I get worried, maybe she is dead? Months go by and finally she shows up with her knives. I take her bag, unwrap the cloth and inside is a large filet knife, the handle, the blade- all of it is covered in blood, old blood. I ask where it's from. She says nothing, but I know. She looks at me. Her mouth is trembling. I put the knives aside and hold her. Her whole body is shaking- like an earthquake. I tell her it’s ok and I feel my back is wet. She cries, tears coming down intensely. I hold her and keep saying over and over it’s ok.” He pauses. “After, things move fast. Love hits us strong. We leave El Paso, I meet her mother and suddenly we're married. Now here in Mexico City. A good life." 3w

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jaworskijason A year ago I found myself visiting a thrift store in San Diego where I came upon this guy with a shopping cart full of old clothes for a small girl. He was mumbling to himself and seemed sunken, visibly drained. I approached him, asking a few questions to see if he was alright. He asked if I wanted to hear what he had to say, to "really hear." Of course I said yes. We sat down on a used couch while in back of us a wall of different sized TVs played portions of Terminator 2. Calmly, he told me that it was the anniversary of his daughter's death tomorrow. She had been struck by a car at an intersection a few miles away from us. "So many things could have gone different that day to change what happened. She could have missed the light, she could have gotten out of school earlier, later, or been sick and not gone at all that day. So many things..." I sat stunned. "And so every day, on the anniversary of her passing I put an outfit out for her on the street where it happened. It's nothing to celebrate, but everything to remember." He paused for a bit and smiled that smile one has when they've accepted tragedy, realizing nothing can be changed. I gave him a hug and watched him disappear behind a plastic curtain where, after wiping my eyes, I made this photograph. A few weeks later I searched for the intersection where his daughter was struck. On a wooden utility pole a piece of paper danced in the wind with her name and the devastatingly small block of time she occupied on this planet: 2002-2011. A small dress was wrapped around the pole along with an altar consisting of a worn down candle and a sun bleached bouquet. I placed this print there, smiled a smile similar to the one he gave me and walked away. 3w

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jaworskijason Walking around some morning in Makati I came across this kid going through bags of trash picking things out. I asked him what the best thing he found was and he showed me his collection: some trinkets, toys and a bit of food. We exchanged stories and I told him how I used to wait for bread and produce deliveries in the morning to take from stores when I was homeless awhile back. Then he told me his method: "We poke holes in the delivery boxes before the stores open up and wait for them to throw out the damaged stuff." 🏿 3w

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jaworskijason Just chilling, looking sexy with a sub-machine gun by the the window in #Makati #A7s :) 4w

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  •   bnvts Hey @jaworskijason how do you like the T3? I'm lurking onto buying one to help my Nikon L35AF.. 3w
  •   jaworskijason @bnvts it's great, the only downside I can think of is that it burns through batteries a bit quick but that's it! I'd recommend trying to find one with two teeth on the take-up spool, those last a bit longer. Thanks for asking! 3w
  •   bnvts @jaworskijason thks for your input! 3w

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Normal Jason Jaworski

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jaworskijason Slum buddy in the #Philippines #A7s 1mon

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jaworskijason Former #NASA employee turned transgender bender. #35mm #Film #trix400 #shootfilm #ContaxT3 1mon

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jaworskijason Dem Dang Gators in #Miami 🐊 #RX100 1mon

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Normal Jason Jaworski

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jaworskijason Psychoactive betel nut buddy in #Taiwan #35mm #Film #trix400 #shootfilm #ContaxG2 1mon

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