Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield Five bucks I don't have thanks to that girl Sunny -_- 1d
  •   holden__caufield These are the five dollars that Sunny and the elevator pimp took from Holden the morning after he almost slept with Sunny. The five extorted dollars are significant because they shows the situation that Sunny is in, another thing that symbolizes loss of innocence “‘Like fun you are.’ It was a funny thing to say. It sounded like a real kid. You’d think a prostitute and all would say ‘Like hell you are’ or ‘Cut the crap’ instead of ‘Like fun you are.’(94)” Sunny is a young girl, whose life has come to prostitution. Her youth, in addition to her mannerisms and nervous habits, force Holden to see her as a person, instead of just another prostitute. When taking the five dollars from Holden, Sunny is very concerned that her actions will be taken as criminal, and repeatedly assures Holden that she’s not a bad person. This is contradictory because she is a prostitute, yet is very concerned about her moral compass. “She waved five bucks at me ‘See? All I’m takin’ is the five you owe me. I’m no crook.’(103)” This is a naïve thought, which further highlights her youth and innocence soiled by her prostitution. 1d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield Those moron girls in the Lavender room didn't even offer to take the bill 1d
  •   holden__caufield In the Lavender Room, after Holden drank with the three older women he met, they didn’t offer to take the bill. This upsets Holden, but is in line with his expectations of the women. Despite sharing a drink and dancing with them, Holden is disgusted by the women, and calls them “morons (81)” on a regular basis. He is very contemptuous towards them, and finds them ugly to look at, except for the blonde woman who he finds “sort of cute (79).” Holden’s impression of the three women contrasts sharply with his impression of Jane Gallagher, and the fact that they didn’t offer to take the bill is representative of this. In Holden’s opinion, the women are superficial, shallow, and have petty, uninteresting thoughts, quite unlike Jane, who Holden finds very interesting and intelligent. 1d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield The carousel old Phoebe was riding on the other day 1d
  •   holden__caufield During the last chapter of the book, Holden visits Central Park, where his sister Phoebe rides on a carousel. Like the “Little Shirley Beans” record, Phoebe riding the carousel is another symbol for loss of innocence. “All the kids tried to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she'd fall off the goddam horse, but I didn't say or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it is bad to say anything to them (201).” When Phoebe tries to grab the ring, Holden finally accepts that loss of innocence and growing up is a natural part of life, and that you can’t protect children forever. After coming to this realization, Holden was overcome with emotion. “I was damn near bawling, I felt so damn happy, if you want to know the truth (213)." 1d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield Allie's baseball mitt. I miss that kid....he had some brains, that kid. 1d
  •   holden__caufield Allie’s baseball mitt is first introduced to the reader when Stradlater asks Holden to write a descriptive essay for him. Instead of writing about a room or a house, Holden chooses to write the essay on the mitt, which has poems written on it in green ink. The mitt is significant because it belonged to his deceased younger brother Allie, who Holden loved and cared for with all his heart. When the reader is introduced to the mitt, it is the first time that the reader is exposed to Holden’s more emotional side. It is also symbolic of his emotions because the glove holds sentimental value to Holden, and he doesn’t show it to anyone outside his immediate family, and Jane. The mitt is so important to him that when Stradlater mocks Holden’s essay on the mitt, Holden gets very upset, and this mockery is one of the prime reasons for Holden leaving Pencey. “‘All right, give it [the mitt] back to me, then.’ I said. I went over and pulled it right out of his goddam hand. Then I tore it up. ‘What the hellja do that for?’ he said. I didn’t even answer him. I just threw the pieces in the wastebasket. Then I lay down on my bed, and we both didn’t say anything for a long time (44).” 1d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield 'Little Shirley Beans' by Estelle Fletcher for Phoebe 1d
  •   holden__caufield While in New York, Holden decides to buy the “Little Shirley Beans” record by Estelle Fletcher for his little sister Phoebe. The album is a symbol for innocence, which clearly links to the book’s overarching themes of loss of innocence. He dearly tries to protect the album, symbolic of Phoebe’s innocence, by keeping it "in a big envelope and all (103)." When Holden drops the record in the park, it represents innocence being shattered. After dropping it, Holden tries to pick up the pieces, and put them back together, but realizes that this is impossible, and that Phoebe must eventually grow up. 1d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield Room key 2d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield I wonder if they've changed those Indians yet 🏾🏾🏾 2d
  •   holden__caufield Holden visits the Museum of Natural History before his date with Sally to pass time and look for his younger sister Phoebe. The Museum is significant because it is a static entity in Holden’s ever-changing life, which he comments on and enjoys. "The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody'd move (121).” The love of stativity exemplified by the museum links to Holden’s dislike for change and the theme of loss of innocence. He comments regretfully on how everyone is different in some way or another each time they enter the museum. The theme of loss of innocence is further stressed because Holden discusses in detail how he used to go to the museum as a child, and how that experience was different to his current experience of the museum. 2d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield Where do they go when the lake freezes? 2d
  •   holden__caufield As Holden drives around the city in taxis, he asks them where the ducks go for the winter. His curiosity concerning a question with such an obvious answer highlights Holden’s childlike innocence, despite his attempt to appear fully-grown. “I ordered a Scotch and soda, and told him not to mix it—I said it fast as hell, because if you hem and haw, they think you're under twenty-one and won't sell you any intoxicating liquor (69).” Holden’s total confusion about the duck’s migratory patterns are a clear-cut example of how childlike his mind is. “I was wondering where the ducks went when the lagoon got all icy and frozen over. I wondered if some guy came in a truck and took them away to a zoo or something. Or if they just flew away (72)." However, Holden also persevered in getting his answer, asking a second taxi driver after the first one gave him an inadequate answer. His strong and constant perseverance is another childlike quality exhibited in Holden. 2d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield She always keeps her kings in the back row, that Jane 2d
  •   holden__caufield The checkers remind Holden about Jane, a girl Holden speaks obsessively about. When Stradlater first mentions his date with Jane, Holden immediately speaks about how he used to play checkers with her, and how she always kept her kings in the back row. “‘Did you ask her if she still keeps all her kings in the back row?’ ‘No, I didn’t ask her. What the hell ya think we did all night – play checkers, for Chrissake?’ (23)” Holden is obsessed with Jane, and is almost as preoccupied with her kings in the back row. To Holden, Jane’s checkers strategy represents her unwillingness to endanger herself, and her love of security, especially with boys, which Holden likes about her. “I don't want you to get the idea she was a goddam icicle or something, just because we never necked or horsed around much. She wasn't (98).” 2d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
  •   holden__caufield The red hunting hat appears quite early in the novel, and, like the cigarettes, follows Holden throughout the story. However, unlike the cigarettes, Holden’s hat represents his sense of individuality. Although he is sometimes self-conscious about wearing the hat in public, he religiously wears it. ““But it was freezing cold, and I took my red hunting hat out of my pocket and put it on—I didn't give a damn how I looked. I even put the earlaps down (88).” Holden’s frequent decisions concerning whether or not he wears the hat shows his internal conflict between wanting to be disassociated from the rest of society, and wanting companionship from others. “I took my old hunting hat out of my pocket while I walked and put it on. I knew I wouldn’t meet anybody that knew me, and it was pretty damp out (122).” 2d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield I can't stand the phonies everywhere coping with 2d
  •   tenbeeflex the significance 2d
  •   holden__caufield Throughout the novel, from beginning to end, Holden smokes cigarettes. "I lay on the bed and light up a smoke. Stradlater hated when I smoked in the dorm, it was against school rules but no one could smell it. Stradlater hated when anyone broke any rules. He was so god damn phony. It killed me. It really did, I just turned to the other side on my bed and smoked like a madman, as he clipped his goddam toenails (26).” Holden’s smoking habits are significant as he smokes whenever the people surrounding him are being ‘phony’. The cigarettes also demonstrate to the reader how hypocritical Holden is. Despite his constant smoking, Holden still gets irritated when others smoke, which highlights this hypocrisy. 2d

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal Holden Caulfield
holden__caufield Finally got to this crappy hotel. I can see everything those perverts in the other room are doing from right here. At least they're not phonies or Hollywood prostitutes like my brother. 3d

» LOG IN to write comment.