brodyleven I prefer up to down.
There, I said it.
#skiing
1d

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brodyleven The North Sister.
Fortunately, before we would climb and ski this mountain, we first had to head a little left and get the Middle Sister done safely.
#GetOutStayOut
2d

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brodyleven Smith Rock again.
Thanks for letting me climb on the same rock as you, @grahamzimmerman. And for your hospitality.
This picture isn't of you.
2d

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brodyleven Ran into @davidpowdersteele at the top of the Middle Sister. Well, we actually walked to the top of it with him. But after he pulled away, we crested the summit plateau and ran into him once again. Waiting for us. Like this. 2d

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brodyleven A brand's environmental stance is becoming increasingly important to me. A lot of them are confusing to me and I frequently don't even know what to think about any single company's.
As a landmark, I feel good about @goalzero's. Whose do you respect and why?
3d
  •   northside_skis Maybe consider where your brand is producing their product. Major factory in ????? Boutique brands are trying to combat the issue! Keep it small and local. Less greed + less mess + less impact = nice product. 2d
  •   cindilougrant I see so much waisted plastic from packaging that just gets a product from the factory to the store. Everything is individually wrapped in plastic waist. We recycle it at @white_pine_touring but I have to give big props to @prana for sending it rolled up and tied with a simple piece of material scrap, It's refreshing- 2d
  •   andreasmassitti ny company that's conscious of their impact and does their part in helping eliminate that impact is worth supporting. 2d
  •   kimspan Tahoelab splitboards skis & snowboards 2d
  •   jeromejavelina Right on Brodey- Made in USA - keep the footprint small, keep the know-how here for the future, supports rural communities and ranchers, small batch merino wool, slow wool @duckworthco. 2d
  •   the_rhymenocerous Patagonia because Yvonne Chouinard is the visionary behind the socially responsible company. 2d
  •   johnny_outside Walmart 2d
  •   ncmcadk Patagonia's dedication to sustainability is hard to match. 1d

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brodyleven Water cooler hangs.
#GetOutStayOut @goalzero
3d

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brodyleven I'm just "hanging out" before the next trip. ....get it!? Photograph by the lovely @ktmillerphoto. 4d

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brodyleven Steep, with @acpictures in Los Glaciares National Park, Argentina. 2013. 4d

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brodyleven #nomakeup
pic: @alyssalarson_mt at Red Rocks, Nevada.
5d

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brodyleven @carolinegleich is a happy girl. 6d

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brodyleven We loaded up the car and headed back to the northwest corner of the USA a couple of weeks ago.
This picture was taken during sunrise on the dry approach to Mt. Baker.
1w

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brodyleven The Ultimate Weekend Escape. #MexiSnowGetaway
In my line of work, there isn’t a corner office to which I can aspire. No one is going to point at me in a meeting and say Good Job, Brody. You’re Promoted. I won’t get a bigger desk, a different title, or more paid vacation. I work hard but am recognized in untraditional ways that aren’t intended to be rewards. Most recently, this unintentional feedback came in the form of my first print article with @outsidemagazine. My November 2014 weekend trip to Mexico to climb and ski the tallest volcano in North America with two friends I greatly admire for their ongoing ability to pursue and achieve their own specific dreams, @graysonschaffer and @carolinegleich, is published in the May 2015 issue (the one with the provocative! scandalous! cover). I wrote the article (with significant help from the expert, Grayson, who also captured this picture), took some of the pictures (with significant help from @gopro, and my iPhone), and pushed myself hard but smart, traveling from sea level to 18.5k feet in 24 hours (without significant help from diamox).
If you're unable to buy the magazine but would still enjoy reading the article and watching the associated video, there is a link to it in my profile.
1w
  •   brodyleven Certainly @dmetres, I do. But what you failed to recognize is the big SOCIAL footprint those trips have, increasing awareness and offsetting my travel exponentially. 1w
  •   dmetres @brodyleven good to hear. Thanks for spreading the message. I'm doubtful social media will dissuade Shell from drilling oil in the Arctic, or Peabody Coal from fighting carbon regs, but I recognize that every little bit counts and that we're all in this together. So despite me giving you a hard time, I thank you for your efforts. 1w
  •   brodyleven Never said anything about social media @dmetres...we were in DC lobbying our elected officials. This morning, as a matter of fact, we were at yet another event with them. I appreciate the critique and feedback always @dmetres, keep thinking independently! 1w
  •   actileanltd Amazing photo!! 1w
  •   mjbryan11 @mbryan10 Love the Diamox jab. Inspiring to see someone devoted to keeping it real. 1w
  •   beverlybica A life brilliantly lived! Bravo! 1w

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brodyleven I see potential. 2w

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brodyleven Not burning out any time soon. 2w

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brodyleven Commence frostbite rehabilitation test. 2w

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brodyleven The cold. I’ve been avoiding its mention until now, but I can’t hold it. This will be the last post in my series about Svalbard, because after mentioning the cold, the story is over. It was terribly cold. The coldest I’ve ever been. Our Arctic guide said it was ******* cold. Colder than Patagonia, colder than Denali, colder than Iceland, colder than Vermont. Bone-freezing cold. The cold that you can’t escape, that any layers of clothing fail to keep warm, that numbs your toes for the entire duration of the trip--and, in my case, for the following 6 weeks. The cold in which it’s dermatology suicide to have any skin showing. Gore-tex facemask under a buff behind 6 collars. Climbing mountains--an aerobic activity--in two wool long johns, insulated pants, Gore-tex shells, AND down pants. Overboots covering heated ski boots. Glove liners, down mittens, overmittens. Seven layers on a torso, including two down jackets and an expedition coat. 40 below zero windchill. 12 pound sleeping bags. Frozen water bottles. Frozen fingers. Frozen toes. Frozen nose. My inflatable sleeping pad had a hole in it, so I stacked up 3 foam pads beneath it and shivered on those every night for 2 weeks. There is a good reason we were the first ski film crew to shoot in Svalbard during winter. My nose still has black spots. My left toes are still numb. 2 weeks after returning to Salt Lake City, I went for a sunny run on a 65-degree day. People were running without shirts, sweating, drinking water. I was on the side of the trail, folded in half, on the verge of puking from the pain in my frostbitten fingers.
I will remember Svalbard for a long time to come--it won’t let me forget it. #SFTVsvalbard
2w

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brodyleven This astronaut of a base camp cook is Erla. She made the best camp food I've ever eaten and patiently hung out on a glacier with nine dudes for two weeks. She's young, from Iceland, easily rocks an 8000-meter one-piece down suit while carrying a rifle at sea level, and--surprisingly, considering she is normal--has decided to live in SVALBARD of all places.
Eat your heart out.
#SFTVsvalbard
3w

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brodyleven People in Svalbard are rightfully terrified of unsolicited polar bear encounters. In order to avoid any, our crew had nightly Polar Bear Watch.
After wrapping up dinner at 9pm, the Watch began. The luckiest person would have the 9-10pm shift, only having to stay awake for an extra hour. He would then stand outside the next Watcher's tent, say his/her name until he received a dreary reply, and wait until the rotation commenced. The flare gun and extra bright headlamp would be handed over, the previous Watcher would head to his tent, and the new enlistment would begin a 60-minute service of walking laps around base camp, turning the light on at each corner to check for sneaky bears. ...At least this is how it worked in theory.
In practice, we were tired from a day of skiing in sub-zero temps, perturbed to have been awoken from a warm sleeping bag, and more likely to sit in the quasi-heated group tent than walk around.
Due to inconsistent rotations, I frequently found myself with hour-long shifts between 1am and 5am. Some nights, I'd wake up to sideways blowing snow and nearly unbearable temperatures. Other evenings, my awakening would be greeted by dancing, bright green aurora borealis and no wind, warm enough to remove my @salomonfreeski expedition down jacket.
But as the days got longer and the sun rose earlier, the northern lights were traded for 4am laps around camp without even a headlamp to look for polar bears.
@bjarnesalen was always before me in the rotation, and would wake me every night by loudly and sarcastically whispering through the thin nylon walls in his British-Swedish accent, "Brody, are you ready to hunt some polar bears!?"
#SFTVsvalbard
3w

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brodyleven We couldn't have visited Svalbard at a more interesting time of year. Due to its latitude at 78+ degrees north, the islands see huge variations in the amount of sunlight received. For six months of the year, the sun doesn't crest the horizon. All winter, it's dark.
Polar winter.
Then, sometime in February, the sun peaks over the horizon and lights up some of the hills for the first time in months. The town of Longyearbyen celebrates. Soon thereafter, our team showed up. Our 3pm flight arrival greeted us with relative late-afternoon light, and a sunset chasing us soon. But in March, the days are quickly trying to reach what the arctic soon features: midnight sun. To achieve that in little over a month, sunlight increases by 90 minutes EACH day, with the sun rising 45 minutes earlier and setting 45 minutes later. So although we had limited daylight when we arrived in Svalbard, by the time we left 3 weeks later, it was barely getting dark.
Folks, that's AN HOUR AND A HALF MORE SUNLIGHT EACH DAY.
#SFTVsvalbard
3w

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